Ask a Question forum→Dying? or thriving? Help me help my bushes

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Dallas, Texas
kystinson
Jun 2, 2020 1:26 PM CST
Location Dallas, Texas. We bought a new house recently and the previous owners had a landscaping company. My husband and I have decided to care for the gardening on our own but our bushes do not appear to be doing well. They looked great when we bought the place in March, but now the large round bushes are developing large red spots all over them and the littler ones (see picture) are sparse and sickly looking. We have had some large rain storms this spring... possibly too much water? Do they need fertilizer? Please help an uneducated gardener bring these plants back to life. Thank you!!
Thumb of 2020-06-02/kystinson/2f4ccb
Thumb of 2020-06-02/kystinson/fa56d7
Thumb of 2020-06-02/kystinson/fee48f

Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Quitter's never Win
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oneeyeluke
Jun 3, 2020 1:26 AM CST
Your boxwoods have been drought stressed at some time in the past and pruned while in that state. The Indian Hawthorn has a fungus called Entomosporium leaf spot and will alway have it. The problem with hitting your hedges everytime a twig sticks out with the clippers is a common mistake most people make with hedges. Its best to only prune lightly twice a year instead of everytime a twig grows out of shape. Everytime you use the clippers on the hedge the stems that are cut have to scab with extra water. If there's no water in the plant to help scab over the cut, you will have a deficit causing the plant great stress. Alway check the ground about 6 inches below the surface to make sure you have enough moisture.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
Dallas, Texas
kystinson
Jun 3, 2020 6:07 AM CST
oneeyeluke said:Your boxwoods have been drought stressed at some time in the past and pruned while in that state. The Indian Hawthorn has a fungus called Entomosporium leaf spot and will alway have it. The problem with hitting your hedges everytime a twig sticks out with the clippers is a common mistake most people make with hedges. Its best to only prune lightly twice a year instead of everytime a twig grows out of shape. Everytime you use the clippers on the hedge the stems that are cut have to scab with extra water. If there's no water in the plant to help scab over the cut, you will have a deficit causing the plant great stress. Alway check the ground about 6 inches below the surface to make sure you have enough moisture.


Thank you for the explanation! I had no idea. Do you have a suggestion to fix the problem or are these too far gone to save? Will the boxwoods heal themselves if I leave them alone for a while?

Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jun 3, 2020 10:02 AM CST
Someone got over-zealous when shearing.

Not sure they are boxwoods... yaupon holly are often planted around here as a look alike, that can tolerate the heat that kills boxwoods.

While yaupons are a good enough choice, cutting them down below the green... means dead spots in the bush.

Those formal hedges are generally considered a joke in southern gardening anyway... look at this as a chance to plant something nice, and then learn how to prune for a more natural appearance.

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