Ask a Question forum→Dracaena Reflexa browning the middle?

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Name: Demi Elder
Brooklyn, NY
Image
DemiArianna
Jun 3, 2020 3:49 PM CST
Hi all,

I recently went to a small plant shop and fell in love with this plant and brought it home. I believe it's a Dracaena Reflexa. It's browning in the middle where the new leaves should form. I'm wondering if it is dying? Does this mean no more new leaves? I repotted it into a slightly bigger pot, it seemed a bit pot bound prior. I can't really fathom how new leaves will push up under these that are seemingly dead at the base. Is there anything I can do for it? Is it a goner?

Any help is appreciated, and thanks in advance!
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Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Quitter's never Win
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oneeyeluke
Jun 4, 2020 9:41 AM CST
Take the plant out of the deco pot and allow the soil to dry well. It looks like a waterng issue. When you took the pot out of the deco pot, was it heavy or light weight?
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 4, 2020 9:59 AM CST
Your plamt is a Dracaena deremensis 'Lemon-lime.'

When new leaves are discolored or dying it is a clear sign of recent root damage caused by repotting and/or overwatering.

How much of the original soil did you remove when you repotted?

How do you decide when to water and how much do you give it.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Demi Elder
Brooklyn, NY
Image
DemiArianna
Jun 4, 2020 10:36 AM CST
oneeyeluke said:Take the plant out of the deco pot and allow the soil to dry well. It looks like a waterng issue. When you took the pot out of the deco pot, was it heavy or light weight?


I can't fully recall but I want to say it was light-weight. I don't remember it being particularly heavy.
Name: Demi Elder
Brooklyn, NY
Image
DemiArianna
Jun 4, 2020 10:40 AM CST
WillC said:Your plamt is a Dracaena deremensis 'Lemon-lime.'

When new leaves are discolored or dying it is a clear sign of recent root damage caused by repotting and/or overwatering.

How much of the original soil did you remove when you repotted?

How do you decide when to water and how much do you give it.


Yes, that's the one! thank you!

I put all of the original soil in plus new soil, when repotted.

I watered it a bit to get it moist a day or two before repotting, then water it until it drained thereafter. I haven't watered it again since, as I'm waiting for the top inch to dry out. But if it was a watering issue it occurred at the store, because those leaves had browned before I bought it.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 4, 2020 12:54 PM CST
Oh, dear. That means it was probably overwatered at the store. I hope they gave you a good price!

Remove any soil you added to the top of the original rootball when you repotted as that soil prevents oxygen from penetrating the root zone readily and makes it harder to determine when to water. The uppermost roots should be just barely covered with soil. Then, allow the top half-inch of the remaining soil to feel dry before watering just enough to last for about a week.

Recovery will depend on just how badly damaged the roots were by the overwatering. Other than letting the soil around the roots dry out properly, there is nothing more you can do. Crossing Fingers!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Demi Elder
Brooklyn, NY
Image
DemiArianna
Jun 4, 2020 2:18 PM CST
WillC said:Oh, dear. That means it was probably overwatered at the store. I hope they gave you a good price!

Remove any soil you added to the top of the original rootball when you repotted as that soil prevents oxygen from penetrating the root zone readily and makes it harder to determine when to water. The uppermost roots should be just barely covered with soil. Then, allow the top half-inch of the remaining soil to feel dry before watering just enough to last for about a week.

Recovery will depend on just how badly damaged the roots were by the overwatering. Other than letting the soil around the roots dry out properly, there is nothing more you can do. Crossing Fingers!


I did get it for a good price, thankfully! And there's hope yet, I'll follow suit as recommended. Let's see if it'll pull through. Thanks so much!

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