Roses forum→Roses that can survive Mississippi?

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Richton, Mississippi (Zone 8a)
Trying my best
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CitrusSweete
Jun 3, 2020 7:02 PM CST
Hello, I'm new to roses and am wondering if anyone has suggestions for roses that can survive Mississippi's hot, humid weather and almost constant spring rain and advice for keeping roses alive in general.

I planted one rose this spring but apparently chose the wrong time. The next week, it rained almost every day and basically drowned the poor thing before it had a chance. Would fall planting give a rose a better chance at surviving the spring rain? Our winters don't get terribly cold down here but we get rain in winter, too.

I also have the issue of being surrounded by pine trees. Spots in the yard do get several hours of sunlight but I wouldn't bet on it being a full six hours.

Any advice or suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated, especially if you know of any climbing roses I should try my hand at. I'd really love to grow a humungous climber but I don't think the weather will let me lol
Name: Christopher
New Brunswick, NJ, USA (Zone 7a)
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AquaEyes
Jun 3, 2020 11:17 PM CST
Look at the old Chinas, Teas, Noisettes, Tea-Noisettes, and some of the Hybrid Musks with Tea or Noisette parents -- for example, 'Buff Beauty'. The first four groups actually seem to like the heat and humidity. If you're having issues with the rain causing flooding, perhaps your best bet is to raise the beds several inches to a foot to help with drainage.

:-)

~Christopher
Baton Rouge, LA, zone 8b/9a.
MikeInBatonRouge
Jun 4, 2020 4:53 AM CST
Rolling my eyes. Rolling my eyes. I am in your neighboring state in the deep South. I second what Christopher said about the Chinas, teas, and noisettes being well suited down here. But roses are quite varies in appearance and uses in the landscape. If you have your heart set on more hybrid tea forms, there are certainly some that will do fine with the right care. There are many others that will struggle no matter what.

To be clear, spring is a perfectly fine time to plant. I suspect yours drowned, based on your description. It seems a paradox, but roses are thirsty plants that can't tolerate standing water for more than two or three days.

Be encouraged, though. An even slightly raised planting area, say, 4 or 5 inches aboves the surrounding area, is usually adequate to solve drainage problems. I should know. My yard is pure clay with ZERO drainage. I have roses in a 10 inch raised bed, and others simply surrounded by a plastic lawn edging about 4 inches, with compost and mulch added. They all do fine.
What you really need to avoid is creating a soup bowl affect by a hole amended with good soil but surounded by poor soil the water will be trapped in that. Mound up, rather than dig down, and you will have more success. The roses will still send anchor roots down but will keep most of their feeder roots up top.

A few varieites that have done well for me have two qualities, heat tolerance and blackspot resistance. Some roses are also a bit more tolerant of partial shade, but none take full shade.
Some of my favorites:
Madame Antoine Marie, an elegant old soft pink blend tea.
Belinda's Dream, modern shrub that blooms like a hybrid tea, phlox pink.
Double Knockout, red shrub a bit shaplier, more full blooms than the original knockout, just as bullet proof.
Posseidon, fragrant lavender floribbunda.
Plum Perfect, deep plum floribunda.
Tiffany, intensely sweet warm pink blend hybrid tea, will blackspot but not defoliate.
Easy Spirit, a new soft white hybrid tea with slight blush...very rainspot-resistant and healthy.
New Dawn, a LARGE blush pink climber, relately shade tolerant and carefree, just give it room; my mature over 15 feet tall.
Savannah, salmon pink intensely fragrant.
There are many others.
Richton, Mississippi (Zone 8a)
Trying my best
Image
CitrusSweete
Jun 4, 2020 7:30 AM CST
What height and depth of raised bed would I need to help a rose survive around two or three weeks of on and off rain (I'm using our recent weather as an example)? Should I go ahead and just have a 12 inch raised bed all around with another foot of soil loosened and amended below it?

I used a fish emulsion fertilizer for my previous rose and it seemed to do well on it before the rain killed it. Is that the preferred fertilizer? And since I have poor soil, would I need to use it more often?

And if I were to try and plant a new rose this fall, is there anything specific I would need to do help the rose root before winter? I've never tried planting anything in fall, so I'm basically clueless but I really want to try again
Richton, Mississippi (Zone 8a)
Trying my best
Image
CitrusSweete
Jun 4, 2020 12:17 PM CST
What height and depth of raised bed would I need to help a rose survive around two or three weeks of on and off rain (I'm using our recent weather as an example)? Should I go ahead and just have a 12 inch raised bed all around with another foot of soil loosened and amended below it?

I used a fish emulsion fertilizer for my previous rose and it seemed to do well on it before the rain killed it. Is that the preferred fertilizer? And since I have poor soil, would I need to use it more often?

And if I were to try and plant a new rose this fall, is there anything specific I would need to do help the rose root before winter? I've never tried planting anything in fall, so I'm basically clueless but I really want to try again
Name: GERALD
Lockhart, Texas (Zone 8b)
Hydroponics Greenhouse Region: Texas
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IntheHotofTexas
Jun 4, 2020 4:44 PM CST
Lady Banks, if you can use a climber. Mine love it here in the hottest of Central Texas weather and high humidity, shrug off winters well below freezing, and are unfazed by days of rain. And they get zero care beyond the waterings they used to get in high summer when they were young. And their cuttings are easy to root in summer after new growth.

I also have some Knock Outs that are totally on their own, being way up at the front of the property, doing very well with inattention.

Baton Rouge, LA, zone 8b/9a.
MikeInBatonRouge
Jun 5, 2020 12:10 PM CST
As for how high to raise beds, that is certainly flexible. Even six inches can help. Ten or twelve inches would give you good depth for a lot of enriched soil, but then you have to acquire that soil. So consider your budget and materials options, including what makes up the soil. When I put in my main bed, 8 ft by 28ft by 10 in, i ordered garden soil, had 4 cubic yards delivered. It seemed expensive but was actuslly cheaper than had I bought all bagged soil from Home Depot or Lowe's. For just a few bushes, you ccan easily put together something yourself for not too much.

I forgot earlier to list one of my favorite highly disease resistent roses: Wedding Bells, a satiny medium pink hybrid tea with good fragrance and even some modest shade tolerance. Mine gets between 4 and 6 hours of sun a day, depending on the season, and grows and blooms fine, though like most it blooms most with full sun. If you have a choice between morning and afternoon sun, incvery hot climates like ours, morning sun is always best.

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