Irises forum→Any advice for growing Iris spuria?

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Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
Jun 4, 2020 7:01 AM CST
My mystery iris has finally bloomed and I have identified it as Iris spuria. I planted these seeds 3-4 years ago thinking they were California blue-eyed grass seeds from my first seed swap. I actually started growing iris 2018 so now I'm happy to have these but I'm not sure how to take care of them. I have 4-5 clumps but only one flower stalk in one clump. Any way for me to get more flowers?

I've read they are summer dormant and don't like water at this time. I'm not great at watering regularly but we do typically get a lot of summer thunderstorms. Is that the issue? All the clumps are planted on a hill so the drainage is good.

The flower just started to open yesterday so I don't have a good picture. I'll try to take one later today if the overnight thunderstorm hasn't ruined it.
Name: Tienito
Rhode Island (Zone 6b)
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Tienito
Jun 4, 2020 7:39 PM CST
I don't have any advice but tried planting three spuria varieties two years ago. They all went dormant in the summer and I lost two to the summer rains. Also, the space that they left when they went dormant was very awkward. Cinnamon Stick is the one variety remaining. It has five fans and one flower scape this year that will bloom soon. I think i'm going to get rid of it, to make room for more interesting things.

There are evergreen spurias, but unfortunately it's impossible to tell from vendors' websites which varieties are evergreen. I'm sure that information is in a checklist somewhere, but I haven't found it. I might try an evergreen one if I can find it. I don't think I will try any summer dormant ones again. The climate here in southern New England is just too wet in the summer.

Where summers are drier, I imagine that spurias can be noble sights. Especially in large gardens.
Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
Jun 4, 2020 9:40 PM CST
I'm pretty sure mine are evergreen. Be happy to share if you want to try it. I have way too many clumps and they keep getting bigger. Not enough space in my small yard.

Still no good picture as the falls are still curled. Here's the best I could do:


Thumb of 2020-06-05/bxncbx/acdcac

Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
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crowrita1
Jun 5, 2020 6:35 AM CST
I grow my spuria in the same beds as, and with the same care, as my bearded irises. Spuria seem to need the rhizome a "little deeper", in the soil, and , when they are "getting started"(when setting new plants), can't be allowed to dry out (same as SIB's), so I water often, and use a thin mulch. Once well established, they seem pretty bullet-proof Shrug!
Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
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bxncbx
Jun 5, 2020 7:19 AM CST
Thanks Arlyn! I read on some websites that spuria require very dry conditions over the summer which I definitely can't provide every year. But considering these guys have thrived and made clumps already I guess I shouldn't have been so worried.

Thanks for letting me know that they need constant water when just planted. I'm giving some of my clumps away this summer so I'll pass that information on to the people who get them. Smiling
Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
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Paul2032
Jun 5, 2020 7:50 AM CST
Looks like Spuria Ochroleuca. Check the data base for pictures.
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah
NE Oregon (Zone 7b)
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TBManOR
Jun 5, 2020 7:09 PM CST
......... definately Iris orientalis, of which spuria ochroleuca is synonym
Species Iris (Iris orientalis)
mine is just getting ready to bloom. Easiest to grow of the spuria type (limniris group)
A common name for it is the "Yellow Banded Iris"
[Last edited by TBManOR - Jun 5, 2020 7:13 PM (+)]
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Name: Elena
NYC (Zone 7a)
Daylilies Spiders! Plant and/or Seed Trader Winter Sowing Hybridizer Peonies
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bxncbx
Jun 5, 2020 8:05 PM CST
Thanks guys! Now at least I know what I have!

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