Ask a Question forum→Can i prune fruit tree sprouts i dont like during the growing season?

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Cypress, TX
aaronkoe
Jun 4, 2020 12:29 PM CST
I know typically you wait until the dormant season to do a majority of the pruning on your fruit trees, and reserve pruning only to the dead or broken branches during the growing season.

What i was thinking is if i check my trees regularly, i can pick off new sprouts that i don't like (growing inward/downward/crowded area etc) before the tree ever devotes any energy to forming the branch and leafs that will just get pruned at the end of the season anyways. Its seems very logical but am i causing stress to the tree or something else i'm not thinking of?

Thank you.
Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Quitter's never Win
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oneeyeluke
Jun 4, 2020 1:03 PM CST
Making cuts and open wounds on a tree can be the entrance place for disease to enter the tree. For instance Oak Wilt is dangerous tree disease, which is attacked by a tiny mite transporting spores into the tree through the wounds on the tree. Once the tree gets Oak Wilt it spreads it underground to any other oaks it touches underground.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 4, 2020 3:31 PM CST
Welcome!

Yes, rub those little twigs out before they get big enough to be part of the winter prune.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Bryan, TX
WAMcCormick
Jun 4, 2020 3:51 PM CST
I rub off or pull off those unwanted shoots all the time. I have not seen any negative result from it, and I think it forces the tree to send growth where I want it. Like Luke said though, any breaks in the bark can become entry points for insects. My strategy against those insects is to make sure to give the trees very good nutrition and proper amounts and timing of water so the trees are full of vitality and can heal quickly.
If it takes a long time to grow, remember that if nobody plants it, nobody has it.

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