Ask a Question forum→Where to plant veggies...

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Milpitas, CA
SoulReaver009
Jun 4, 2020 7:23 PM CST
So I'm really thinking of taking the plunge and putting veggies in the ground... Smiling Thinking Confused Crying Sad Crossing Fingers!

It gets warm here in the afternoon.
I'm thinking of spiking a tent made of shirts to provide some protection from the overbearing sun. But I'm not sure if that will be what my veggies want. Veggies need direct sun, right? I don't know how to beat the angle of the sun path in conjunction with my back yard to give my plants a permanent spot that they will like.

So here are some pics of my backyard. I was thinking to put some plants in the front yard under my lemon tree, but have heard that the lemon tree roots are bullies to other plants roots. So that's a no go. Anyways, please help and thank you, as always.

To give you an idea of the path of the sun... in the first pic you can see the corner of my yard, on the other side of the maple tree. If you draw an imaginary line from that corner, through the maple tree, and through me (where I took the pic), that is the path that the sun travels.

I am thinking to plant under my maple tree, but I am afraid the maple tree will just hog all of the water and my veggie fertilizer when I apply it.

I can plant between the rose bushes, but they get hard sun. From 11AM til sun down. So I'm thinking the veggies will just bake and die... is the angle of my house cursed for veggie gardening?

Or between the statue and rocks as you can see in the last pic.

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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 4, 2020 11:32 PM CST
Even at my elevation (5000 ft), in the high desert, my vegetable garden is on the south side of my house in full sun (no trees).

Find the sunniest spot in your yard. If there has to be some shade, make it afternoon shade. But remember, you need about 8 hrs of sun for happy veggies.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Milpitas, CA
SoulReaver009
Jun 5, 2020 12:06 AM CST
My squash plant is wilting in the sun. I've been trying to harden it off this week.

Introducing it to sun, and dampened sun, and putting it in shade when it wilts from the heat and sun. We have a wooden structure that breaks up the sun. So I've been keeping it under that. And as the sun moves through the sky, it gets shade/sun.

Maybe it will take longer.
Maybe it will stop when I plant it in the ground. I'm not sure.

Thank you.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jun 5, 2020 6:15 AM CST
Squash plants wilting in the sun is generally no problem... it's how they deal with moisture retention.

Personally, I'd start with squash seed in the ground.

Your pot grown squash may already be suffering from being in that container and ground planting it is coming too late to help.

I start seeds in containers too... but try to get them in the ground before the plants get pot-bound... usually... before they have more than a single true leaf.

DaisyI said:
Find the sunniest spot in your yard. If there has to be some shade, make it afternoon shade. But remember, you need about 8 hrs of sun for happy veggies.

What she said.
[Last edited by stone - Jun 5, 2020 6:17 AM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 5, 2020 10:59 AM CST
You live in the best climate in California - never too hot and never too cold. You should be picking tomatoes and squash by now. I would have had those veggies in the ground about March 15 at the latest in your area (Zone 9 or 10).

I agree with Stone. Plant squash and cucumber seeds directly into the garden. They do a lot better.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Milpitas, CA
SoulReaver009
Jun 5, 2020 7:40 PM CST
So I got a new space to do my veggie garden. Thank you bro!

Pic below.
So I'm getting ready to throw some plants in. Just have to weed them out. Might take a week. The dirt is really clay (am I saying that right?).

So I have 4.5 bags of miracle grow garden soil, and 3 cu ft of Kellogg's mulch for veggies.

I also mixed in a tub of used coffee grinds. And turned the dirt to attract earthworms.

Here are the pics. Is there anything else I should do? I'm kind of half-a***** it because I'm so behind. It that's ok for this year. It's my first time, and a huge learning experience for me. Planning to only keep 1 bag of miracle gro for myself for staring seeds again, come sept and October.

I got pumpkin seeds and want to grow pumpkins for myself and also to donate for people and kids who can't afford. I'm thinking to the food banks. If anyone can recommend another place or idea to provide pumpkins for people who can't afford, please let me know.

Pretty much that's it. Please any suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thank you
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 5, 2020 9:59 PM CST
Yes, dig all that stuff in. If its Miracle Gro GARDEN soil, don't save it for starting seeds. That product must be mixed into the native soil. If its POTTING soil, you can use it for starting seeds.

Unless you plan to dig up the entire yard, skip the pumpkins.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Milpitas, CA
SoulReaver009
Jun 5, 2020 10:06 PM CST
Really? Are pumpkins "that" bad? There's no way to confine them?
Aren't squash and pumpkins similar? Should I be concerned about planting squash and/or cucumbers in the yard?
Name: sumire
Reno, Nevada (Zone 6a)
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sumire
Jun 5, 2020 10:20 PM CST
Yes, pumpkins are a type of winter squash. But pumpkin vines and leaves are HUGE. As in, I have seen them trail off 20 feet to grow their pumpkins. Your planting bed looks great, but it is a little too limited in size for a pumpkin.

edit: I forgot to add. Cucumbers and squash plants come in all different sizes. Most of them that you are thinking of growing are probably much more manageable in size. (Don't try tromboncino squash either, they taste wonderful but have a similar problem to pumpkins.)
www.sumiredesigns.com
[Last edited by sumire - Jun 5, 2020 10:31 PM (+)]
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Milpitas, CA
SoulReaver009
Jun 5, 2020 11:51 PM CST
Ok thank you!

Also, another question I forgot to ask...

How much do I mix the miracle gro garden soil into my garden bed?

Do I mix it into the top 6" or do I have to dig down deeper? I know these roots will go deep, so I'm just wondering how deep I have to mix in the miracle gro garden soil.

Please say "top 6"... *fingers crossed*

Thank you all again
Name: sumire
Reno, Nevada (Zone 6a)
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sumire
Jun 6, 2020 11:32 AM CST
Umm.... What happens at lower than 6 inches?

If 6 inches is as deep as you have energy for, go with it. I never manage to mix in deeper than the length of a shovel blade when I'm turning compost in. Its probably not ideal, but more ideal than failing to plant veggies for lack of energy.

If at 6 inches you run into a layer of clay, hardpan or something else that makes digging impossibly hard, be warned that your plants will also find it impossibly hard to put roots through it. And it might turn the bed into a giant bathtub when you water. Drainage is a good thing.
www.sumiredesigns.com

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