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Jun 5, 2020 11:40 AM CST

Hi everyone,

I'm new to this whole plant thing. I bought a few this week, and I realized that my apartment gets less light that I thought. I place my ficus elastica by the window since I read it needs moderate to high light. But that window is facing north and I read that it's basically the emplacement that gets the less light.
I took this picture at 1pm to show you what kind of light gets in. Do you think it's enough? My only south facing windows are in my bedroom and it doesn't really get a lot of direct light, and in the kitchen where it's basically impossible to have a plant.

Thank you :)
Thumb of 2020-06-05/PlantsForNewbies/a93c71
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Jun 5, 2020 3:38 PM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
That location in front of the north window should be fine as long as the window remains uncovered throughout the day.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Avatar for PlantsForNewbies
Jun 5, 2020 3:56 PM CST

Thank you so much for your reply.
The plant is in a pot without drainage (bought it like that). Is there a precise amount of water I should give it? I watered it on Wednesday and gave it about 1 1/2 cup, and I spray water on the leaves every 2 days.

Thank you so much for your advice.
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Jun 5, 2020 4:26 PM CST
Name: cheapskate gardener
South Florida (Zone 10a)
Adeniums Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Procrastinator Plumerias Houseplants Growing under artificial light
Frugal Gardener Foliage Fan Dragonflies Container Gardener Cactus and Succulents Butterflies
Honestly, I'd put it in a plastic nursery pot with drainage holes and use your current pot as a cover pot. Then, when you water, move your plant to the sink and add water until it runs out the bottom and return to its cover pot after it stops draining.
I have found that coffee, tea, and rose can all agree on one thing... water everyday.
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Jun 6, 2020 6:26 AM CST

I'll do that ! Is there a specific soil I should use? Like I said, I'm pretty new to this. A soil that doesn't retain water?
Thank you.
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Jun 6, 2020 7:57 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
There are many risks involved in repotting plants, especially when done improperly.

As an alternative, remove all loose soil from the surface of the rootball that is not in immediate contact with the roots. That soil serves no useful purpose and it prevents oxygen from penetrating the root zone. Once you have removed that excess soil, then allow the top inch of soil to dry out in between waterings. Add just enough water each time so that it reaches that same level of dryness again in about a week's time. Adjust the volume of water accordingly. After a few tries, it will become apparent just how much water it requires each week.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at wcreed@HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
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