Plant ID forum→Is this tree of heaven, staghorn sumac, or something else?

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Long Island, NY
dman1972
Jun 5, 2020 12:41 PM CST
this shoots suckers out like crazy. They are all over my yard. Staghorn sumac or tree of heaven. Thanks for the help
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[Last edited by dman1972 - Jun 5, 2020 12:59 PM (+)]
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Long Island, NY
dman1972
Jun 12, 2020 10:51 AM CST
dman1972 said:this shoots suckers out like crazy. They are all over my yard. Staghorn sumac or tree of heaven. Thanks for the help
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Can anybody help?
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Jun 12, 2020 11:08 AM CST
To my old eyes, those leaves don't look like Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) but I could be wrong.



They do remind me more of the leaves of Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) but I'm not certain if that's it either.



We have lots of folks here who are really good at identifying plants from photos but it will help greatly if you can upload more photos, showing the entire plant, bark, stems, blooms, fruit, etc.
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 12, 2020 11:14 AM CST
Its a Sumac. Tree of Heaven has an extra little bump on the leaf by the petiole.
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Name: Kelly
Redding, California (Zone 9b)
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KellyFW
Jun 12, 2020 12:59 PM CST
I'm not convinced it is either of those. Can you add more photos showing how the leaves attach to the branch or at least tell us if the leaf pattern is alternate (staggered up the branch) or opposite (leaves originating in pairs on opposite sides of the branch)?
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Jun 13, 2020 9:23 AM CST
Especially since this plant shoots suckers up all over the yard - collect some of them to show here!

You can not only show WHOLE plants, but closeup details of the ENTIRE compound leaf, the stem and how leaves are attached (as asked above), as well as some of the root system from which these stems and leaves are suckering.

The colonizing behavior certainly delineates which species this could be, and which it likely cannot be. I don't believe that plant is Ailanthus altissima; the leaves/leaflets are not right. It COULD be a Sumac of some sort (Rhus sp.) - but you have not provided enough information for certainty.

Rhus typhina will have very fuzzy stems. That separates it from other commonly seen Sumac species.

Did you or a nearby neighbor remove any established plants recently? That act often results in extreme suckering behavior such as you are experiencing.
John
Long Island, NY
dman1972
Jun 18, 2020 2:42 PM CST
More pictures here. I've cut so many of these things there aren't really any full plants left, I think it started with one that my landscaper "removed" but left the roots...before long it was all over my yard.
there was one whichwas growing way up in a flowering tree in my yard that is now dying you can see in one of the pictures. You can see how thick this one vine grew..I think this was maybe in a year. The bark is not fuzzy, relatively smooth. Feels almost like a rope. I don't plan on letting any full plants come back but this is like a 20 minutes every weekend I have to attack these things. The last picture is the closest I have to a full leaf. It just poked it's head out from under some rocks.

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[Last edited by dman1972 - Jun 18, 2020 2:43 PM (+)]
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Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
CPPgardener
Jun 18, 2020 3:36 PM CST
Now that one looks like Wisteria and vining is what it does—all over the place.
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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Jun 18, 2020 10:42 PM CST
CPPgardener is spot on. There is no doubt this is a Wisteria sp.

It would have been really helpful to know the information provided in dman1972's last post, from the beginning.

If you want to stop/eradicate this plant, cutting it off won't work. You should treat the growing shoots with a non-selective herbicide like glyphosate. The Glove of Death works well. You could also cut/paint the ends of stems as they sprout.

I think you may want to secure a different "landscaper" - and take the current one to court for malpractice.
John
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jun 19, 2020 6:55 AM CST
Good eye CPPgardener! Thumbs up That last photo indeed looks like Wisteria.
Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) and Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) are both non-native invasives in the U.S.
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


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