Ask a Question forum→Hydrogen peroxide

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Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 2:52 PM CST
Do I apply hydrogen peroxide to my tomato plants when the soil is wet or dry. From what I understand I can apply it to the plants when the soil is wet and then from there future purposes apply it only when the soil is dry for the first couple of inches
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 5, 2020 2:59 PM CST
Welcome!

I wouldn't apply it at all. What are you trying to accomplish?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 3:26 PM CST
DaisyI said: Welcome!

I wouldn't apply it at all. What are you trying to accomplish?


To help with root rot and to provide oxygen to the soil and plants as well as to fight off the fungus on the leaves mostly
Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 3:29 PM CST
dwmi said:

To help with root rot and to provide oxygen to the soil and plants as well as to fight off the fungus on the leaves mostly


Diluted to about 3/4 of a cup to 1 cup per gallon of water to spray on the foliage and soil
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
Jun 5, 2020 3:41 PM CST
Are you kidding me? That is a good deal of assumptions on your part. You are going to water in hydrogen peroxide at a 4 to 5% concentration just in an attempt to avoid a possible problem?!?!?!
Why not just grow better plants in good soil under the right conditions and then deal with any issue that might arise.
What will you do if hydrogen peroxide at that concentration does irreparable harm to your plant instead?

Have you ever grown a tomato???
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!
[Last edited by BigBill - Jun 5, 2020 3:42 PM (+)]
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Name: sumire
Reno, Nevada (Zone 6a)
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sumire
Jun 5, 2020 3:50 PM CST
I have to agree with DaisyI and BigBill. Unless you understand the chemistry, don't apply peroxide....
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jun 5, 2020 3:59 PM CST
I agree

That does not sound healthy for the plant. Skip the peroxide entirely. It is not necessary or probably even helpful.

For the record, a 1/16 dilution of 3% peroxide (the commonly sold topical solution) is under 0.2% final concentration.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jun 5, 2020 3:59 PM (+)]
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central ohio (Zone 5b)
PlantingOaks
Jun 5, 2020 4:36 PM CST
I absolutely use hydrogen peroxide in my seed starting trays - to keep the algae down in the watering system mostly, though it supposedly also helps with damping off?

I've never heard of it recommended outdoors though. How reliable was the source you learned this from?
Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 6:12 PM CST
PlantingOaks said:I absolutely use hydrogen peroxide in my seed starting trays - to keep the algae down in the watering system mostly, though it supposedly also helps with damping off?

I've never heard of it recommended outdoors though. How reliable was the source you learned this from?


Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 6:20 PM CST
BigBill said:Are you kidding me? That is a good deal of assumptions on your part. You are going to water in hydrogen peroxide at a 4 to 5% concentration just in an attempt to avoid a possible problem?!?!?!
Why not just grow better plants in good soil under the right conditions and then deal with any issue that might arise.
What will you do if hydrogen peroxide at that concentration does irreparable harm to your plant instead?

Have you ever grown a tomato???


I've used hydrogen peroxide in the past and my friend has too with good success. They say it's the same as Rainwater and it helps with aeration of the soil . I've read on this a hundred different times and I always read the same results. It's supposed to kill fungus and diseases on contact. Maybe I'm just doing things wrong. And I've grown tomatoes for 15 years
Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 6:35 PM CST
dwmi said:

I've used hydrogen peroxide in the past and my friend has too with good success. They say it's the same as Rainwater and it helps with aeration of the soil . I've read on this a hundred different times and I always read the same results. It's supposed to kill fungus and diseases on contact. Maybe I'm just doing things wrong. And I've grown tomatoes for 15 years

I did make a mistake and it was a half a cup to a gallon of 3% hydrogen peroxide
[Last edited by dwmi - Jun 5, 2020 6:36 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Jun 5, 2020 6:47 PM CST
Why not try growing 2 tomato plants side by side, one with peroxide and the other without, before you commit to adding it to all your plants. Peroxide is not a miracle cure and it definitely doesn't make tap water the same as rain water. Tap water will most likely have more dissolved salt (not reversed by peroxide) and it will likely be more alkaline (esp. If it's groundwater). I would argue (based on some experience with plants other than tomatoes) that acidifying tap water will make a bigger difference for growth, speaking of the various ways it may be different from rain water. And my view of aeration in the soil is that you accomplish this by choosing the right soil mix and container, and maintaining a proper wet-dry cycle when watering.
Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 7:01 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:Why not try growing 2 tomato plants side by side, one with peroxide and the other without, before you commit to adding it to all your plants. Peroxide is not a miracle cure and it definitely doesn't make tap water the same as rain water. Tap water will most likely have more dissolved salt (not reversed by peroxide) and it will likely be more alkaline (esp. If it's groundwater). I would argue (based on some experience with plants other than tomatoes) that acidifying tap water will make a bigger difference for growth, speaking of the various ways it may be different from rain water. And my view of aeration in the soil is that you accomplish this by choosing the right soil mix and container, and maintaining a proper wet-dry cycle when watering.


I understand what you're saying it's just that we get tons of rain here where I live. I have excellent soil that provides good drainage but I was just curious about the hydrogen peroxide solution
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
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BigBill
Jun 5, 2020 7:09 PM CST
Who said it is like rainwater? Are you talking about acid rain?

In order for you to have acid rain of any consequence, you need to be like 500 or so miles down wind from a huge industrial center spewing all kinds of smoke and chemicals into the air.
Then the rains washed these chemicals out of the air causing acid rain. What huge industrial center are you downwind from?
The NE had dozens of lakes destroyed by acid rain in the Adirondack mountains because they were downwind from the huge steel mills and industrial centers of Ohio Michigan and Pennsylvania.
And acid rain was a very bad thing so why do you want to recreate acid rain for your plants.
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jun 5, 2020 7:12 PM CST
It is used to kill algae in irrigation systems and sewer plants and as a bleaching agent in laundry products. The FDA no longer recommends its use to clean wounds as it destroys healthy tissue. I'm not sure what you think it will do for your plants... but, they are your plants.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 7:14 PM CST
BigBill said:Who said it is like rainwater? Are you talking about acid rain?

In order for you to have acid rain of any consequence, you need to be like 500 or so miles down wind from a huge industrial center spewing all kinds of smoke and chemicals into the air.
Then the rains washed these chemicals out of the air causing acid rain. What huge industrial center are you downwind from?
The NE had dozens of lakes destroyed by acid rain in the Adirondack mountains because they were downwind from the huge steel mills and industrial centers of Ohio Michigan and Pennsylvania.
And acid rain was a very bad thing so why do you want to recreate acid rain for your plants.


I think I opened up a can of worms on this question haha. I guess I will not use the hydrogen peroxide but thank you for all your help
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 5, 2020 7:15 PM CST
dwmi said:
I guess I will not use the hydrogen peroxide but thank you for all your help


Good plan!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Missouri
dwmi
Jun 5, 2020 7:23 PM CST
DaisyI said:

Good plan!


Thank you very much for your help
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 5, 2020 7:29 PM CST
Thumbs up
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
American Orchid Society Judge
Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
Butterflies Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Image
BigBill
Jun 5, 2020 7:30 PM CST
Hey dwmi, it was your question, ultimately it is your decision but when you make a post like you did, you found out how controversial that it was.
But you asked for an opinion and you got one. If it wasn't along the lines of what you were thinking, well that is fine. I have to imagine that you even learned quite a bit about hydrogen peroxide.
So like I said, if you want to use it, use it. None of us will ever know whether you do or not. But the fact is that you might be better informed then you were a few days ago, and that is cool!
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!

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