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Jun 6, 2020 6:26 PM CST
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Annuals Roses Peonies Region: Pennsylvania Region: Mid-Atlantic Hostas
Growing under artificial light Foliage Fan Daylilies Butterflies Bookworm Aroids
Can someone identify these lovely plants?
1. Thumb of 2020-06-07/csandt/05aa29
2. Thumb of 2020-06-07/csandt/ff2c2f
3. Thumb of 2020-06-07/csandt/e66ec3
Thank you.
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Jun 6, 2020 6:42 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Its hard to ID plants from just the flowers but,

1. Dogwood
2. Japanese Anemone
3. Tradescantia
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
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Jun 7, 2020 5:03 AM CST
Name: Mone
Chicago between O'Hare & Lake (Zone 6a)
Plumerias Cottage Gardener Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Bee Lover Birds Hummingbirder
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies Frogs and Toads Butterflies Beavers Irises
#2 is Anemone canadensis
Windflower (Anemonastrum canadense)
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Jun 7, 2020 6:06 AM CST
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Agree with DaisyI and pitimpinai, and I will add:

#1 will be one of the shrubby Dogwood species. Likely candidates - if this plant is growing in central PA - include Cornus amomum, Cornus racemosa, and Cornus sericea or similar relatives in the genus. These are Silky Dogwood, Gray Dogwood, and Redosier Dogwood, respectively.

One of the ways to begin separating that closely related and similar looking species is by each of these seasonal characteristics. Flowers are remarkably alike, but not so the fruit. In this group, the species tend to fall into bluish fruit or whitish fruit. Gray Dogwood has very showy pedicels, especially after birds (many species) avidly glean its fruit.

The species are also separated by what likes to nibble on the foliage. I have long grown Cornus amomum, Cornus drummondii, and Cornus racemosa. Each summer, contingents of caterpillars make munchies of the leaves, and then go on their way (or are consumed as part of the diet of parent birds raising their young).

Almost all the shrubby Dogwood group are easy to grow species, each with some minimal preference for growing conditions. They reward by contributing in multiple seasons (flowers, fruit, foliage, fall color, form, and sometimes stem color) to the organized and the natural landscape. Best of all, they hugely support the cause of nurturing native fauna - and are one of the best inoculants of natural areas yearning to replace invasive exotic understory species with the plants that used to be there.

Wouldn't it be better to have the birds redistributing Dogwood seeds, instead of Multiflora Rose, Bush Honeysuckle, and Common Buckthorn...
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Jun 8, 2020 7:33 AM CST
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Annuals Roses Peonies Region: Pennsylvania Region: Mid-Atlantic Hostas
Growing under artificial light Foliage Fan Daylilies Butterflies Bookworm Aroids
Thank you all very much for the IDs. All three of you contributed very helpful information.
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