Ask a Question forum→Digitalis help

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Bethel, Ohio
JosephDurham
Jun 6, 2020 8:16 PM CST
Hello everyone!
I am new here but I have been gardening for quite a while, but on a small scale. Well the opportunity finally arose for me to extend my flowerbed down the side of my house and plant flowers like I've always wanted.

On to my question, digitalis........I have two planted, and beautiful blooms all up and down, a pretty purple. Some of these have already started falling off. Will the foxglove have new blooms, or once they fall off, are they done blooming?

I understand that the digitalis is self seeding, but what will I end up with next year? More digitalis, but no blooms?

I've looked all over the internet but no one comes out an answers my questions. Lol. Thank you in advance!!

Joseph
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Name: one-eye-luke US.Vet.
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oneeyeluke
Jun 7, 2020 3:23 AM CST
After the flower pollinate themselves the flowers will go to seed and fall off. However they are a biennial plant, which means they bloom in their second year with beautiful, bell-shaped flowers, and then die. They reseed easily, so if you want flowering plants every year, plant foxgloves two years in a row.
NOT A EXPERT! Just a grow worm! I never met a plant I didn’t love.✌
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jun 7, 2020 6:37 AM CST
Really depends on how happy they are.
I've had them bloom and rebloom...

When the seedpods split open, I go out with a bucket and a scissors, clip the pods into the bucket, and work up a new bed to scatter the tiny seeds over.

Being biennial means that they often die after blooming, but sometimes you may get an extra year from an occasional plant or two.

Biennial means that you plant the seeds as soon as they ripen... and the plants that come up this year... usually in a week or two... bloom next Spring!
Bethel, Ohio
JosephDurham
Jun 7, 2020 6:45 AM CST
Ok. Thank you.
So, since I am not going to be planting a "new bed" with these I should just let them go, and plant a second plant next year and then I should have a good bed of digitalis if all goes well and they continue. Correct?

Just wanting to make certain I am understanding.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jun 7, 2020 6:49 AM CST
JosephDurham said: I should just let them go, and plant a second plant next year and then I should have a good bed of digitalis if all goes well and they continue. Correct?


If they are happy, you should see babies this summer.
you should not have to buy and plant more.

It's a back-up belt and suspenders move to collect seed and create a new seed bed...

Anyone with more than a single blade of turf grass probably has room for another seed bed.

Name: Sharon Rose
Grapevine, TX (Zone 8a)
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Altheabyanothername
Jun 7, 2020 7:12 AM CST
If you bought them as plants and they are dalmation digitalis...they are supposed to be a sterile hybrid. You can occasionally see a seed but I have not seen them sprout.

As for foxglove in general as Stone says it depends on how happy they are...if you really want perennial digitalis...you can look for seeds...try to buy or trade for seeds from in your area. When I have difficulty getting flowers to start from seed...sometimes it takes finding a fellow gardener in the area and getting seeds from them. More likely if they grow for them they like the area, or that gardener has more of a heirloom type seed, and it will grow for you Thumbs up

Edit...Stone is right about it being a biennal...when I said perennial better choice would of words would have maybe been self-seeding.

Many blessings for success and beautiful flowers!
One to take to heart....1 John 4
[Last edited by Altheabyanothername - Jun 7, 2020 7:16 AM (+)]
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Bethel, Ohio
JosephDurham
Jun 7, 2020 7:14 AM CST
stone said:
Anyone with more than a single blade of turf grass probably has room for another seed bed.



Hurray!
If I had my way, the entire yard would be a flower bed.
Bethel, Ohio
JosephDurham
Jun 11, 2020 6:22 PM CST

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Ok, now in this regard,
What should I do? Should I leave the long leader alone? Or would pruning it waaaayy back initiate the other two shorter starts to take off and bloom?
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jun 12, 2020 6:28 AM CST
Leave things alone.
Cutting things back would only deprive you of seed.

those secondary blooms will bloom regardless.

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