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Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jun 10, 2020 9:53 AM CST
You didn't answer my question about soil depth.
pretty important...

When I look at your latest pictures, what comes to my mind... too much carbon in the compost.

One time... I had a dump-load or two of mushroom compost brought in... and the plants looked like that...

Needed supplemental nitrogen.... There was too much woody material in the compost... it was robbing the plants of nutrients.

I'd suggest making some compost tea...
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jun 10, 2020 10:11 AM CST
If you haven't, find some well balanced fertilizer and use it.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Cape Cod, MA
fernflower
Jun 10, 2020 10:26 AM CST
I haven't used anything yet, is a compost tea a type of fertilizer?

The mix of topsoil/compost in the bed is 13 inches deep, below that is about 3-4 inches of loosened sandy soil.

The topsoil I filled it with seems very woody/mulchy
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jun 10, 2020 10:32 AM CST
Compost tea... it's what it sounds like.

Take some of the compost that you've made from household kitchen scraps... add water to it... water/fertilize the plants with the mixture.

Some people get real complicated with oxygenating aquarium stones and stuff... so be prepared for a wealth of information when you start to do some research.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jun 10, 2020 10:33 AM CST
fernflower said:I haven't used anything yet, is a compost tea a type of fertilizer?


That depends upon who you ask. I would use some fertilizer already formulated by someone else with a degree in soil chemistry. The brand and price don't matter, they all do the same thing, just make sure is balanced and has micronutrients.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 10, 2020 10:34 AM CST
stone said:Compost tea... it's what it sounds like.

Take some of the compost that you've made from household kitchen scraps... add water to it... water/fertilize the plants with the mixture.


Not all of us are lucky enough to have a compost pile.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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stone
Jun 10, 2020 10:37 AM CST
https://medium.com/@evanfolds/...
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jun 10, 2020 10:38 AM CST
DaisyI said:
Not all of us are lucky enough to have a compost pile.


Luck has nothing to do with it.

Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Container Gardener Herbs Moon Gardener Enjoys or suffers hot summers Heirlooms
Vegetable Grower Bookworm
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kittriana
Jun 10, 2020 10:09 PM CST
Well, I am not fighting termites and fireants to decompose oak, chinese tallow tree,elm, sweetgum leaves, but you can use green weeds and such to steep and make compost, but you could also use fish emulsion? epsom salt, to help them out.
So many roads to take, choices to make, and laughs to share!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jun 10, 2020 10:30 PM CST
Skip the Epsom salt. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Cape Cod, MA
fernflower
Jun 13, 2020 5:40 PM CST
what a wonderful community here! thank you all so much for taking the time to share your knowledge. it seems it's taking a turn for the worse, does anybody know what's going on with these plants?
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 13, 2020 5:58 PM CST
I'm at a loss. They really look like they have been over-fertilized. Way back in the beginning, did you plant your veggies in dry soil and then water?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Container Gardener Herbs Moon Gardener Enjoys or suffers hot summers Heirlooms
Vegetable Grower Bookworm
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kittriana
Jun 16, 2020 5:42 PM CST
Only other thing I can think of is too much salt in soil or water- I have to be careful with watering since our city water has a salt filtration system, and I have heard reports of chloramine in water hurting plants...
So many roads to take, choices to make, and laughs to share!
Cape Cod, MA
fernflower
Jun 16, 2020 5:51 PM CST
Update: I gave them a balanced fertilizer, the weather warmed up, and we got some really good rain. I feel like everything started looking happier! then today I saw a friends garden that got the same tomato starters I did, and hers are GIANT compared to mine! hers have grown so much and mine are not much bigger than when I planted them. My husband thinks the soil is too dense and there isn't enough air in it? could that be doing something?



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Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Container Gardener Herbs Moon Gardener Enjoys or suffers hot summers Heirlooms
Vegetable Grower Bookworm
Image
kittriana
Jun 16, 2020 6:04 PM CST
You need to remind him plants survive in rock, on mountains even. Rainwater is always healthiest for plants, still you might suggest he go out and plow something? If you disturb those roots that are seeking more rain, you will stunt them. Gardeners have a saying about some plants- First year they creep, 2nd year they leap- and it works in gardens, too- like watching water boil...I on the other hand have moles and I can tell you, too much air will kill them too. Just let the days of summer move on in and you will see a difference. Your neighbor probably isn't growing in a first year garden, let time do its thing and congratulate yourself on what does survive. Too much wood seems to be the complaint of all gardeners on purchased soil this year, but we use wood chips as a hydromulch to protect the garden from our sun, if the rain helped, it could have been too dry. Good Luck
Hurray!
So many roads to take, choices to make, and laughs to share!
Name: Sid
NH - New Hampshire
shainasid
Jun 17, 2020 8:36 AM CST
I think your garden is fine. Its only been a few weeks and the store bought plants are go through a bit of shock if not hardened off properly. This is already tricky to do in New England- even trickier this season. As your neighbor in NH we had a blizzard in May, then two weeks later were in the 90s then back to frost warnings a few weeks later, and are now supposed to be in the 90s soon. Also James Prigioni (youtuber) hilariously and accurately describes store bought starts as 'junkies' addicted to mega doses of fertilizer, calm temps, etc. The kind of over fertilizing nurseries do (and lots of well meaning at home gardeners too) for plant starts means they look great early on but haven't needed to toughen up and develop strong roots. A little tough love early on makes for stronger plants. When I give starts to friends they look at me like I'm cracked- my plants look so puny in comparison to store bought, but time and time again they later tell me (albeit frustratingly a bit shocked) that my starts routinely outperform commercial starts. In my experience (especially with veg and herbs) slow and steady really does win the race. Even with proper hardening off, plants will often go through shock for a few weeks when relocated- its ok they will recover. Most of us know what it feels like after a really big move to a new home/town/city etc. There is a time of adjustment- same for plants. They kind of just need to be left alone to do their thing and get over the shock. That being said here are a few suggestions: 1) Be patient- gardening has painfully taught me this lesson over and over again. It can help to focus on other things- do garden chores eg. get your trellising system in place for the toms etc., or plan/begin your successions eg. plant some heat tolerant lettuce or other greens from seed (never buy lettuce starts again it is remarkably easy and cheap to grow from seed- friends don't let friends purchase lettuce starts IMO- also Luke from MIgardener (also on YouTube has a hilarious rant about this if you are interested). Watering before 10am is still a great suggestion that someone else mentioned as we are having a drought in New England- (just try not to water log your peppers they will not thank you for it). 2) Pick the outer leaves of your lettuce and eat them, it makes them grow more enthusiastically I promise. 3) Remove the lower tomato leaves/branches and pepper leaves -its something many gardeners do when planting for a variety of reasons. 4) The dragon tail radish is not grown for the root like a typical radish but rather the edible pods that follow the flowers so you want it to flower so that it can start to produce for you- this is winning.
Good luck!
'In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer'
-Summer (L'Été)
Camus
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jun 17, 2020 8:36 AM CST
fernflower said:Update: I gave them a balanced fertilizer, the weather warmed up, and we got some really good rain. I feel like everything started looking happier! then today I saw a friends garden that got the same tomato starters I did, and hers are GIANT compared to mine! hers have grown so much and mine are not much bigger than when I planted them. My husband thinks the soil is too dense and there isn't enough air in it? could that be doing something?

Not likely as I have naturally very , very dense soil and tomatoes do just fine.
Get some liquid org. fertilizer, fish works well, mix it in a pail and soak the whole bed.
If all perks up, you have a general lacking; if only some perk up, you have a specific problem.
General fertilizer is fine before planting but once plants are in, a more dedicated fertilizer works best when things are not working well.
Liquid works right now, not next week.
If that bed is heavy on wood chips, it needs nitrogen.
Try some liquid chelated iron.
You do not have chlorosis but it helps with Nitrogen up take.
[Last edited by RpR - Jun 17, 2020 8:48 AM (+)]
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Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Container Gardener Herbs Moon Gardener Enjoys or suffers hot summers Heirlooms
Vegetable Grower Bookworm
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kittriana
Jun 17, 2020 11:49 AM CST
Peppers hate nitrogen. Liquad iron best, but for flinty cherty soil they use a lime before planting or when fertilizing to help plants uptake nutrients, a bit south of you say Illinois, Tennessee, etc, just so you can be confused all over again at all the stuff we practice. You want worms? use used coffee grounds scattered out.
So many roads to take, choices to make, and laughs to share!

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