Houseplants forum→plant identifcation help pls!

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damajesticmuffin
Jun 8, 2020 3:46 AM CST
Hi, so I recently made a new enclosure for one of my reptiles and bought a lot of plants for it. I was just browsing for harmful plants to reptiles and turns out philodendrons are very harmful to them, and I think the plant might be a philodendron! There is no naming on the pot. Also, the plant drooping down on the right side is a different plant, not the same one.

Any help is appreciated, thank you!!

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JBarstool
Jun 8, 2020 4:21 AM CST
What frightens me most about your question is that part about "...one of my reptiles..." implying there are more. But I will try to help answer your question anyway, with the following caveat:

I am no expert on houseplants (yes I know Philodendrons are not houseplants in their native environment); in fact I do not grow any houseplants. I have plenty of outdoor plants to kill without bringing my battles indoors.

Based on the fairly pronounced leaf midrib I might lean toward your plant being an Epipremnum aureum, or commonly, Pothos.

One good way to distinguish between the two is to note how your plant produces new leaves.
Does the new growth simply unfurl from a new leaf or does it extend on the vine in a cataphyll? A cataphyll is a small, modified leaf that eventually appears papery and brown before falling off leaving a new true leaf in its place; this growth is associated with philodendrons. Not a good description of the process, but I'm no wordsmith.

That being said, both plants are members of the same family, Araceae so I have no idea whether one, both or neither are harmful to reptiles. Which is something else I would be inclined to keep outdoors.

Hope this helps - but I'd be surprised if it does. (Tongue planted firmly in cheek)
I find myself most amusing.
[Last edited by JBarstool - Jun 8, 2020 4:25 AM (+)]
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damajesticmuffin
Jun 8, 2020 4:44 AM CST
JBarstool said:What frightens me most about your question is that part about "...one of my reptiles..." implying there are more. But I will try to help answer your question anyway, with the following caveat:

I am no expert on houseplants (yes I know Philodendrons are not houseplants in their native environment); in fact I do not grow any houseplants. I have plenty of outdoor plants to kill without bringing my battles indoors.

Based on the fairly pronounced leaf midrib I might lean toward your plant being an Epipremnum aureum, or commonly, Pothos.

One good way to distinguish between the two is to note how your plant produces new leaves.
Does the new growth simply unfurl from a new leaf or does it extend on the vine in a cataphyll? A cataphyll is a small, modified leaf that eventually appears papery and brown before falling off leaving a new true leaf in its place; this growth is associated with philodendrons. Not a good description of the process, but I'm no wordsmith.

That being said, both plants are members of the same family, Araceae so I have no idea whether one, both or neither are harmful to reptiles. Which is something else I would be inclined to keep outdoors.

Hope this helps - but I'd be surprised if it does. (Tongue planted firmly in cheek)



Hehe yes I do have quite a few reptiles, luckily I am not in a rush to move her into this enclosure.

However, I've only had this plant a little under a week so I haven't had a chance to properly study the plant long-term. There are no cataphylls, and by observation from the smaller leaves, they just seem to grow from the roots. I do hope it is a pothos because Epipremnum aureum is even more toxic to reptiles!!

Here's a picture of the unidentified plant's leaf (on the left) compared to a leaf of a golden pothos (on the right), its a LOT bigger if that helps?
Again, thanks :)





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tofitropic
Jun 8, 2020 5:08 AM CST
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I believes you have two different plant there, the one with geniculum and collecting marginal veins is an Anthurium, (a bird nest type).
The vine one without geniculum is a philodendron, (could be P hederaceum, or something else)
The commonly called photos is actually Epipremnum aureum. Epipremnum aureum was in pothos genus at one times, but now remove into Epipremnum genus, however common names prevails, some Scindapsus (pictus) is also called pothos
Cathaphyl present both in Philodendron and almost in all Anthurium with very few exception, but absent in Epipremnum. However cataphyls are only present in tips of the plants, and in many cases dropped immediately after leaves unfurls. so if it is non present it is not necessarily exclude Philo or Anthurium, but it will be present in growing tips


damajesticmuffin
Jun 8, 2020 5:26 AM CST
tofitropic said:Thumb of 2020-06-08/tofitropic/eb154f
I believes you have two different plant there, the one with geniculum and collecting marginal veins is an Anthurium, (a bird nest type).
The vine one without geniculum is a philodendron, (could be P hederaceum, or something else)
The commonly called photos is actually Epipremnum aureum. Epipremnum aureum was in pothos genus at one times, but now remove into Epipremnum genus, however common names prevails, some Scindapsus (pictus) is also called pothos
Cathaphyl present both in Philodendron and almost in all Anthurium with very few exception, but absent in Epipremnum. However cataphyls are only present in tips of the plants, and in many cases dropped immediately after leaves unfurls. so if it is non present it is not necessarily exclude Philo or Anthurium, but it will be present in growing tips



Ahh okay, thank you both so much for your time! I'll remove the philodendron and replace it with something else, maybe a type of small bromeliad, I'll see.
Thank you both again!
Port d'Envaux, France (Zone 9a)
A Darwinian gardener
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JBarstool
Jun 8, 2020 2:04 PM CST
Don't thank me - all I did was point you up a one way street in the wrong direction without a paddle. But I did say I don't know diddly about indoor plants.

Which, by the way, is why I hold true to the sound gardening advice to never identify a plant of which you are not 100% sure. When you do you just prove that there are t w o plants that you don't know; the one asked about and the one you incorrectly identified.

I find myself most amusing.
[Last edited by JBarstool - Jun 8, 2020 2:06 PM (+)]
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plantladylin
Jun 8, 2020 3:06 PM CST
Hi damajesticmuffin, Welcome!

I agree, the plant at the top of your hand in the photo looks like a type of Anthuriums (Anthurium) and the one to the right looks like Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum var. oxycardium)

Both of those plants are in the same family (Araceae) and most plants in that family contain calcium oxalates in varying concentrations. I don't know how toxic they'd be to reptiles munching on them but to be on the safe side, I'd advise removing them from the habitat.
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