Houseplants forum→Indoor Ivy Fainted/Limp

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Name: PJ
Massachusetts
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plantdadtime
Jun 8, 2020 12:13 PM CST
I went to check on my ivy yesterday morning and found it completely limp; the leaves, while not crunchy, do not stand up on their own and are not tracking the light from the window as they usually do. Parts of the vine itself almost feel hollow-- they bend easily, like a paper straw. Much of it is still firm and rigid, especially closer to the base, but the ends are worrying me. My initial thought was that I underwatered it, so I immediately took the pot and watered bottom-up using a small bowl until it stopped accepting water.
Thumb of 2020-06-08/plantdadtime/470fcb
I am not sure how reactive ivies are, but this is the second day after I watered bottom-up and I haven't noticed any change in its condition. Does it seem revivable? Am I wrong about the watering? Any suggestions for other things I can check are also appreciated. While I love all my plants, I especially would like to save this one, as it's a friend's.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Jun 8, 2020 7:55 PM CST
Doesn't sound too good.
Ivies are 'picky.' I cannot keep a healthy one in a pot indoors, yet when in the ground subject to year round weather they are happy campers.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
Jun 9, 2020 10:11 AM CST
Hedera Ivies are not "forgiving" plants meaning that even relatively minor watering lapses lead to vine and leaf loss that don't recover even when the watering is corrected.

I assume the soil felt quite dry when you discovered its condition. If so, any recovery will have taken place already. So that means you should cut off any portions that no longer look healthy. That may include cutting them back severely.
As long as the roots are still viable, new growth should emerge from healthy vines as long as you monitor the watering carefully.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: PJ
Massachusetts
Image
plantdadtime
Jun 10, 2020 8:57 AM CST
WillC said:So that means you should cut off any portions that no longer look healthy. That may include cutting them back severely.
As long as the roots are still viable, new growth should emerge from healthy vines as long as you monitor the watering carefully.


How do I know what parts are unhealthy enough to cut back?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
Jun 10, 2020 2:11 PM CST
Healthy parts will have healthy leaves and solid stems or vines that are not hollow or shriveled.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: PJ
Massachusetts
Image
plantdadtime
Jun 11, 2020 7:26 AM CST
Alright, thank you. Hope this works 😓
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 11, 2020 9:01 AM CST
It will depend on the health of the roots.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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