Cactus and Succulents forum→Echeveria Identification Help?

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Name: PJ
Massachusetts
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plantdadtime
Jun 8, 2020 1:53 PM CST
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**Edit: resolved! :)

I got these in an arrangement my sister's college sent her as a congratulations for graduating (and, I guess, a pity prize for having to leave campus early with this whole quarantine situation, lol). Anyway, the soil was awful and two of the plants were all but rotted to hell, so I repotted them yesterday with some Bonsai Jack soil and now I'm trying to figure out, based on all their individual needs, if they'll be alright to leave companion potted or if I need to move a few of them. Of course, I need names first.

I did some googling and figured out that most of these are echs, but the purple ech and the green-and-red clusters are giving me a hard time. The purple one looks (to my very inexperienced eye) like it could either be echeveria perle von nurnberg or echeveria afterglow. That one I'm less worried about, though, because from what I've read, they both seem to have pretty similar care requirements. Still, if you have a more certain opinion on that one, I'd love to hear it.

The one I'm more stumped by is the red-and-green cluster. I'm not sure if you can tell in the picture, but it has ciliate hairs, which I've read are more common with sempervivium. You definitely can't see this in the picture but the leaves aren't growing directly from the soil/from a soft base -- it's got an almost tree-like, woody, branching base that the leaves are sprouting from.

Let me know if you disagree with any of my IDs or if you could place a name to either of the two I'm unsure of. Thanks so much!
[Last edited by plantdadtime - Jun 8, 2020 10:51 PM (+)]
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Name: PJ
Massachusetts
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plantdadtime
Jun 8, 2020 2:00 PM CST
Just to update: a friend of mine is telling me the green-and-red plant may be an aeonium. Thoughts?
Name: Mike
Massachusetts (Zone 6a)
Region: Massachusetts
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munchies24
Jun 8, 2020 2:22 PM CST
plantdadtime said:Just to update: a friend of mine is telling me the green-and-red plant may be an aeonium. Thoughts?


I would agree. The way the offsets are coming off the plant don't seem characteristic of an Echeveria, but either Sempervivum or Aeonium, and the rosette is a dead giveaway it is an Aeonium out of those two.
Name: TK
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6b)
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Macrocentra
Jun 8, 2020 2:25 PM CST
Pink one looks like Aeonium 'Kiwi'.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jun 8, 2020 4:07 PM CST

Moderator

Yes, and those ciliate hairs are the clue it's not an Echeveria.

Aeonium 'Kiwi'

Echeverias may have hairs on the leaves, but they are usually on upper and lower surfaces as well as the margins, in a different pattern from Aeoniums (only on the margins).

The plants are all compatible care-wise. They are pretty cramped in the arrangement shown in the picture, though. I would have put half the number of plants in that space. The "Kiwi" in particular has the potential to grow into a small bush, and "Topsy Turvy" has the potential to make lots of offsets. The minute the leaves of one plant start blocking light from the leaves of another plant, they're already competing against each other.

If they will be indoors, provide as much natural light as you possibly can. Ideally find a spot right in front of a southerly facing window. If they will be outdoors, be very careful not to provide too much sun up front, start them out in bright shade or filtered light and then gradually, stepwise increase the exposure over the course of weeks.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jun 8, 2020 4:08 PM (+)]
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Name: PJ
Massachusetts
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plantdadtime
Jun 8, 2020 10:49 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:Yes, and those ciliate hairs are the clue it's not an Echeveria.

Aeonium 'Kiwi'

Echeverias may have hairs on the leaves, but they are usually on upper and lower surfaces as well as the margins, in a different pattern from Aeoniums (only on the margins).

The plants are all compatible care-wise. They are pretty cramped in the arrangement shown in the picture, though. I would have put half the number of plants in that space. The "Kiwi" in particular has the potential to grow into a small bush, and "Topsy Turvy" has the potential to make lots of offsets. The minute the leaves of one plant start blocking light from the leaves of another plant, they're already competing against each other.

If they will be indoors, provide as much natural light as you possibly can. Ideally find a spot right in front of a southerly facing window. If they will be outdoors, be very careful not to provide too much sun up front, start them out in bright shade or filtered light and then gradually, stepwise increase the exposure over the course of weeks.


This is all really great advice, thank you! they will be indoors, so I will be keeping them in a sunny spot, and potentially I do have access to a grow light. I will see about getting a second pot for them, so that they don't overcrowd each other. I'll always take an excuse to go ceramics shopping :)

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