Houseplants forum→Monstera adansonii not unfurling

Views: 5978, Replies: 4 » Jump to the end

newbyplantmom
Jun 8, 2020 2:59 PM CST
Hi,

I've had my monstera adansonii for about 7 months now. I left it in its 6" nursery pot for well over 5-6 months and it did great. It survived a fungus gnat infestation early on, and has been consistently putting out big green leaves. About 2-3 weeks ago, however, I decided to repot it into a 7" pot, because I noticed its roots were coming out of the drainage holes of its nursery pot. Ever since the repotting, I've seen very few leaves and they take forever to unfurl. Some only unfurled half, and some unfurl completely but feel more delicate, thinner and shinier than the rest.

Help! Is my plant just stressed from the repotting? Does it need more humidity or something? I put some before and after pictures below!
Thumb of 2020-06-08/newbyplantmom/a320a7
Thumb of 2020-06-08/newbyplantmom/bda204
Thumb of 2020-06-08/newbyplantmom/690fa4
Thumb of 2020-06-08/newbyplantmom/be3549

Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
Image
Gina1960
Jun 9, 2020 6:38 AM CST
I think a lot of people have trouble with Monstera adansonii and Monstera in general because they don;t understand its growth habit in the wild.

Most Monstera species do not begin in the ground. They begin as epiphytes up off the forest floor in trees and on rock crevices. Those that DO start on the ground rapidly find a host to climb up, and once they develop sufficient adventitious roots to snake down and anchor themselves to both the host and into the soil, the allow their trunk to die off and they grow as epiphytes. They start their lives as what are called lianes, and end up as epiphytes. The proper term for them is hemi-epiphyte. In the wild, as the plant grows higher and higher up the host support, the leaves get bigger and bigger. This is a light-seeking behavior.

Growing and monstera in a container of soil is the opposite of what it would do on its own. But it will adapt to that.

If you want your leaves to grow like they should, you need to offer your plant a support to climb, and offer it adequate light.

The repotting does not seem to have really harmed it. It looks healthy. But many scandent aroids that naturally produce larger leaves the higher the climb will do the OPPOSITE when the stems are allowed to 'dangle'...the leaves will just get smaller.
Award winning beaded art at ceinwin.deviantart.com!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 9, 2020 10:21 AM CST
Your plant is reacting to the repotting. It was doing fine prior to the repotting and probably did not need repotting. Roots coming from drain holes are not necessarily a sign of the plant needing more room as is commonly believed.

If you removed some of the original soil when you repotted, then some of the root hairs were damaged in the process and that may be causing the new leaves to react as they are. In addition, the larger pot with more soil makes it more likely that the soil will stay too moist for too long unless you adjust your watering routine accordingly.

As long as you adjust your watering, the effects of the repotting should be temporary. Be patient.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

newbyplantmom
Jun 9, 2020 11:31 AM CST
Gina1960 said:I think a lot of people have trouble with Monstera adansonii and Monstera in general because they don;t understand its growth habit in the wild.

Most Monstera species do not begin in the ground. They begin as epiphytes up off the forest floor in trees and on rock crevices. Those that DO start on the ground rapidly find a host to climb up, and once they develop sufficient adventitious roots to snake down and anchor themselves to both the host and into the soil, the allow their trunk to die off and they grow as epiphytes. They start their lives as what are called lianes, and end up as epiphytes. The proper term for them is hemi-epiphyte. In the wild, as the plant grows higher and higher up the host support, the leaves get bigger and bigger. This is a light-seeking behavior.

Growing and monstera in a container of soil is the opposite of what it would do on its own. But it will adapt to that.

If you want your leaves to grow like they should, you need to offer your plant a support to climb, and offer it adequate light.

The repotting does not seem to have really harmed it. It looks healthy. But many scandent aroids that naturally produce larger leaves the higher the climb will do the OPPOSITE when the stems are allowed to 'dangle'...the leaves will just get smaller.



That makes a lot of sense! Thanks so much for all the information. I just got my Monstera a coir totem pole, so I can put it in its pot and give it something to climb up on. I'll let you guys know how it goes! Thank You!

newbyplantmom
Jun 9, 2020 11:34 AM CST
WillC said:Your plant is reacting to the repotting. It was doing fine prior to the repotting and probably did not need repotting. Roots coming from drain holes are not necessarily a sign of the plant needing more room as is commonly believed.

If you removed some of the original soil when you repotted, then some of the root hairs were damaged in the process and that may be causing the new leaves to react as they are. In addition, the larger pot with more soil makes it more likely that the soil will stay too moist for too long unless you adjust your watering routine accordingly.

As long as you adjust your watering, the effects of the repotting should be temporary. Be patient.


Yes, I adjusted the watering and am allowing the soil to dry up between waterings. I'll think twice about repotting next time! Thank You!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Houseplants forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "DAYLILY Starling"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.