Sandbox forum→Anybody know woodworking?

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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
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skopjecollection
Jun 9, 2020 5:16 AM CST
I am doing some DIY projects , and would like some tips
BTW, I do not have a wood turner, or a power saw. All i got are hand tools,and some sanding attachments for a screwdriver drill....
Name: GERALD
Lockhart, Texas (Zone 8b)
Hydroponics Greenhouse Region: Texas
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IntheHotofTexas
Jun 11, 2020 6:05 PM CST
Wood turning lathes are larger and require a lot of practice.If you only need a few turned pieces, look online for what's offered. There are several kinds of saws. Use the Internet to learn about them. Same for sanders. Look for YouTube series on woodworking.

Naclean
Dec 29, 2020 4:41 PM CST
I enjoyed the time spent with my father making wooden boxes for most of the flowers we had. It made it look neat and beautiful. Thing is even back in the day we used to struggle due to bad equipment and my dad was quite a pro in woodwork. So if you want to avoid the same issues I would strongly advise you to go on https://thetoolscout.com/ and look for the best deals as to be prepared for the hardest tasks ahead. Apart from a great variety you also get to read reviews on every tool and how to use it, not to mention the direct links to the sellers where you can compare prices too!
[Last edited by Naclean - Jan 1, 2021 9:20 PM (+)]
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Name: Chip
Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming (Zone 3a)
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subarctic
Jan 2, 2021 5:44 PM CST
The term "hand tools" covers a wide range. If you have precision handsaws (like dovetail or Japanese pull-saws), small clamps, and a set of carving tools, you can make wood boxes. Cutting the pieces to size and shaping the joints is excellent practice for larger projects: furniture, cabinetry, etc.

This is a cedar box carved with a New Zealand Mäori koru motif, inspired by the whorls made by a canoe paddle drawn through water.

Thumb of 2021-01-02/subarctic/971fb3

[Last edited by subarctic - Jan 2, 2021 5:46 PM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
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skopjecollection
Jan 2, 2021 10:11 PM CST
subarctic said:The term "hand tools" covers a wide range. If you have precision handsaws (like dovetail or Japanese pull-saws), small clamps, and a set of carving tools, you can make wood boxes. Cutting the pieces to size and shaping the joints is excellent practice for larger projects: furniture, cabinetry, etc.

This is a cedar box carved with a New Zealand Mäori koru motif, inspired by the whorls made by a canoe paddle drawn through water.

Thumb of 2021-01-02/subarctic/971fb3



Ah...japanese pull saws. I got one for myself quite recently. An excellent tool. A lot less sass than the other saws, and cuts quite fast, and almost as accurately as a spine saw(with the steel back thing that prevents bending). Also, a lot easier to work with(less tiring),
Havent done much lately except try to make a kitchen knife handle
Name: Chip
Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming (Zone 3a)
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subarctic
Jan 3, 2021 12:07 AM CST
My latest project was a grill press. Found a chunk of steel bar, cut it, cleaned it up, found matching eyebolts, drilled blind holes and threaded them, and shaped a piece of broomstick. Weighs 2 kg.

Thumb of 2021-01-03/subarctic/6bf3fe

It lets me make Cuban sandwiches and panini on the grill pan I've had for years and seldom used.

Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
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skopjecollection
Jan 3, 2021 12:28 AM CST
subarctic said:My latest project was a grill press. Found a chunk of steel bar, cut it, cleaned it up, found matching eyebolts, drilled blind holes and threaded them, and shaped a piece of broomstick. Weighs 2 kg.

Thumb of 2021-01-03/subarctic/6bf3fe

It lets me make Cuban sandwiches and panini on the grill pan I've had for years and seldom used.


We have those grill toasters as well(old ones were too damn good except when their circuitry blew out , new ones are all ....too gaping for proper toasing.) . However, most efficient method?
A flat pan and a pot on top(preferably with some warm water inside)

[Last edited by skopjecollection - Jan 3, 2021 12:31 AM (+)]
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Name: Chip
Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming (Zone 3a)
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subarctic
Jan 4, 2021 3:04 PM CST
No electricity required. The Le Creuset grill pan is on a gas burner. The press is a 2 cm steel bar, which weight about 2 kg and gets heated on a second burner. I looked at electric panini presses, but decided to go low-tech.

Back to woodworking, I've done projects from small wood boxes and inlays to building a greenhouse to restoring wooden boats. Here's my 5 meter light skiff. Fast and tipsy. She sails like a witch!

Thumb of 2021-01-04/subarctic/a7fcb0

Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
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skopjecollection
Jan 4, 2021 9:44 PM CST
Currently working on a santoku knife handle(original busted)
Name: Chip
Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming (Zone 3a)
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subarctic
Jan 5, 2021 8:04 PM CST
What sort of wood?
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
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skopjecollection
Jan 6, 2021 1:49 PM CST
subarctic said:What sort of wood?


Im gonna assume its pine. I use scrapwood. Still havent found a good vendor(and the only one nearby sells pine)
Name: Chip
Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming (Zone 3a)
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subarctic
Jan 6, 2021 11:37 PM CST
Pine's not a good choice for a knife handle: soft and porous. You might have a look around outdoors (take a small saw) for hardwood trees and shrubs of the right diameter. Junk furniture is also a good source of small pieces of hardwood.

I used to salvage old butcher knives with good steel blades that had been messed up. Reground the edges and reshaped the blades. Then I made new handles from nice wood (curly maple, mountain mahogany, walnut) and old-style leather sheaths. Sold them at mountain man rendezvous and also to Japanese collectors.

Here's one I kept, a skinner. Made it about thirty years ago and have used it to skin game: the shape of the point, rounded and not sharp, is good as it doesn't pierce the hide. The original blade, a big butcher, was twice as long but someone had used it to split firewood and the edge was notched. Excellent steel. The handle is walnut burl. The sheath is harness latigo leather, with decorative rivets. Pretty well used.

Thumb of 2021-01-07/subarctic/2795bb

[Last edited by subarctic - Jan 6, 2021 11:59 PM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
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skopjecollection
Jan 7, 2021 3:15 AM CST
subarctic said:Pine's not a good choice for a knife handle: soft and porous. You might have a look around outdoors (take a small saw) for hardwood trees and shrubs of the right diameter. Junk furniture is also a good source of small pieces of hardwood.

I used to salvage old butcher knives with good steel blades that had been messed up. Reground the edges and reshaped the blades. Then I made new handles from nice wood (curly maple, mountain mahogany, walnut) and old-style leather sheaths. Sold them at mountain man rendezvous and also to Japanese collectors.

Here's one I kept, a skinner. Made it about thirty years ago and have used it to skin game: the shape of the point, rounded and not sharp, is good as it doesn't pierce the hide. The original blade, a big butcher, was twice as long but someone had used it to split firewood and the edge was notched. Excellent steel. The handle is walnut burl. The sheath is harness latigo leather, with decorative rivets. Pretty well used.

Thumb of 2021-01-07/subarctic/2795bb


1. Chopping down trees is illegal here without a permit. On top of that, no logging is done anywhere nearby(and Im not going to get some fresh wood for kindling like the kind that is sold) .
2. I actually got scrap parquetry(beech) that I could use, but chose not to(because it would be too tedious to shape the handle from that.

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