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Avatar for Mrintentional99
Jun 9, 2020 1:17 PM CST
Los Angeles, Ca.
Hello,
I bought two plants from two different places and the soil is different that what I see to buy.

Can someone help tell me what kind of mix these two have? They both seem really light, fluffy, well draining and holds moisture for a while.

Im a newbie with plants. :)
Thank you.
Richard

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Jun 9, 2020 2:13 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Welcome!

The good news is if you just got them, they don't need repotting.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for Mrintentional99
Jun 9, 2020 3:45 PM CST
Los Angeles, Ca.
DaisyI said: Welcome!

The good news is if you just got them, they don't need repotting.


Thank you! Yes they told me but I have other plants that need to be Up potted and I'm trying to find this type of soil or mix. So if anyone knows. Hehe thanks again.
Richard.
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Jun 9, 2020 3:55 PM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
If you need to relax, grow plants!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
Ingredients typically include soil, peat moss, perlite/sponge rock, slow release fertilizer.
There is a most recent blend on the market in the last several years called "moisture retention" potting soil. I can't speak to what they put in the soil mixture to hold more moisture as I have never used it.
Could the additive be more peat moss or something else be added?Someone who has used it can perhaps address what the components might be?

Personally I don't feel the need to use a moisture retentive soil in my outdoor pots and containers. In Michigan, we get rain all year long. We get thundershowers. We water our plants according to what we feel to be an appropriate schedule. I have trouble accepting this type of soil where I can get thundershowers dropping 2-4" of rain within a two hour period. How can I get all that water out of a moisture retentive soil?
But if you lived in South Florida where their dry season lasts 8 months or so, I can see where a moisture retentive soil might be helpful in getting plants through the lean times. But in Florida I did have a thundershower there that dropped 4"+ in 45 minutes!!! Can you imagine?!
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
Last edited by BigBill Jun 9, 2020 4:00 PM Icon for preview
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Jun 9, 2020 4:27 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Don't use moisture control/retentive soil. Its a lot easier to add more water then to figure out how to dry out soil.

The additive is some type of polymer granules that absorb moisture and dry ever so slowly.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for Mrintentional99
Jun 9, 2020 5:36 PM CST
Los Angeles, Ca.
BigBill said:Ingredients typically include soil, peat moss, perlite/sponge rock, slow release fertilizer.
There is a most recent blend on the market in the last several years called "moisture retention" potting soil. I can't speak to what they put in the soil mixture to hold more moisture as I have never used it.
Could the additive be more peat moss or something else be added?Someone who has used it can perhaps address what the components might be?

Personally I don't feel the need to use a moisture retentive soil in my outdoor pots and containers. In Michigan, we get rain all year long. We get thundershowers. We water our plants according to what we feel to be an appropriate schedule. I have trouble accepting this type of soil where I can get thundershowers dropping 2-4" of rain within a two hour period. How can I get all that water out of a moisture retentive soil?
But if you lived in South Florida where their dry season lasts 8 months or so, I can see where a moisture retentive soil might be helpful in getting plants through the lean times. But in Florida I did have a thundershower there that dropped 4"+ in 45 minutes!!! Can you imagine?!




Thank you both for the advice. I'll take it! I appreciate this forum and all of you guys to help me Smiling

Stay safe!

Richard
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Jun 9, 2020 6:07 PM CST
Name: Big Bill
Livonia Michigan (Zone 6a)
If you need to relax, grow plants!!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Region: Michigan Hostas Growing under artificial light
Echinacea Critters Allowed Cat Lover Butterflies Birds Region: United States of America
Welcome
Orchid lecturer, teacher and judge. Retired Wildlife Biologist. Supervisor of a nature preserve up until I retired.
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