Post a reply

Image
Jun 10, 2020 1:04 PM CST
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Annuals Houseplants Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Peppers Seed Starter
Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads The WITWIT Badge Vegetable Grower Beavers
I already made a post about my succulents, because we're moving to the snow, but now I'm asking about my mini-roses.

How should I treat them in such weather conditions (such as below freezing, major rain, etc.)?

Thanks!
Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant, 1Cor. 13:4
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Image
Jun 10, 2020 5:45 PM CST
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Garden Photography Region: Michigan Roses
When are you moving? It could make a difference for this winter. If you are potting them to move them the time of year will decide what you need to do for this winter.

In general you really don't have to treat them any different once they are established. Since most mini roses are own root plants they should be very winter hardy. You might want to plant them a little bit deeper, maybe and inch or two, than they were but that's about all you need to do.
Image
Jun 10, 2020 6:45 PM CST
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Annuals Houseplants Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Peppers Seed Starter
Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads The WITWIT Badge Vegetable Grower Beavers
We are moving within 1-2 months, and I want to be prepared for fall/winter, when it snows.
Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant, 1Cor. 13:4
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Last edited by KFredenburg Jun 10, 2020 6:45 PM Icon for preview
Image
Jun 11, 2020 5:47 PM CST
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Garden Photography Region: Michigan Roses
So we're talking late summer. Do you know the zone and first frost date for where you are moving to? If you are going to be in your new home at least 8 weeks before first frost you can plant them right in the ground and they should be OK for winter. If you are going to be close to the frost date you may need to keep them potted in an insulated but unheated garage for the winter and plant them next spring.
Image
Jun 11, 2020 9:47 PM CST
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Annuals Houseplants Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Peppers Seed Starter
Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads The WITWIT Badge Vegetable Grower Beavers
seilMI said:So we're talking late summer. Do you know the zone and first frost date for where you are moving to? If you are going to be in your new home at least 8 weeks before first frost you can plant them right in the ground and they should be OK for winter. If you are going to be close to the frost date you may need to keep them potted in an insulated but unheated garage for the winter and plant them next spring.


Thanks for the info Seil!

Also, the zone we are moving to is 5.
Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant, 1Cor. 13:4
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.
Member Login:

( No account? Join now! )

Today's site banner is by RootedInDirt and is called "Echinacea"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.