Ask a Question forum→Amazonica polly

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West Babylon, New York
Smenendez94
Jun 10, 2020 5:40 PM CST
Hey beautiful people ... so my Liza girl (Polly) has some discoloration in her leaves ... I recently did move her to a new spot ... I'm not sure if it's uneven watering or spider mites or fungal disease ... someone help please
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
Jun 11, 2020 11:13 AM CST
In the second photo, it looks like there may be a new partially unfurled leaf that is not healthy. Hard to tell from the photo. If so, it is more concerning than the discoloration on older leaves.

How has the new spot changed?

How do you decide when to water and how much do you provide?
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
West Babylon, New York
Smenendez94
Jun 11, 2020 11:54 AM CST
I use a bamboo skewer to see how moist the soil is and then I go from there I'd say maybe every 3 to 5 days the ac has been on so it's a bit dry
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jun 11, 2020 12:58 PM CST
I'm not sure what the problem might be with your African Mask (Alocasia 'Polly') I've heard of people using bamboo skewers to check soil moisture but I've always relied on sticking my finger a couple of inches into the soil to be certain of how wet it might be. The soil should be consistently damp. If it's growing in a heavy, moisture retentive soil, the rhizomes could easily rot. If it's not a soil/water issue and the leaf problems didn't arise until after moving the plant from one location to another, I'm thinking it must be something to do with it's new location. Does the new location have less light, is it warmer than the old location? The plant requires very bright light but no direct sun, consistently damp soil and warm (but not hot) temperatures. It must be protected from cold drafts. They will go dormant at times, sometimes not showing up again for a few years so don't throw out the pot if it suddenly disappears! I once had one go dormant for 3 years before popping up again and it's nowhere to be found the past year and a half so I don't know if it's one of the plants I left when we sold our last house, or if perhaps it's "sleeping" somewhere around here. Green Grin!
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


[Last edited by plantladylin - Jun 11, 2020 2:11 PM (+)]
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West Babylon, New York
Smenendez94
Jun 11, 2020 1:23 PM CST
The new location is away from the draft, south facing, I have skylights so the sun comes down pretty nice on her. Maybe it is the soil, it's excuse me if I'm not right with this but a coco soil... it's more mulchie looking for lack of better terms
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
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Gina1960
Jun 11, 2020 1:31 PM CST
Ummmmmm I don't want to be a dissenter but, @plantladylin, Poly is NOT a rainforest plant. The name Amazonia is a made up name that was given to this ALocasia sanderiana hybrid in the 1950's by the owner of the nursery in Miami where it was discovered. The name of his nursery was 'Amazonia' and he named the plant for his business. This plant actually comes from Asia not the rainforest. But that is the ONLY error in your post!
This cultivar of amazonica (which is considered a trade name not a cultivar name) is called 'Poly' because the tissue culture operation who made it and trademarked/patented it believed it was a polyploid.
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West Babylon, New York
Smenendez94
Jun 11, 2020 2:08 PM CST
@willC the new growth does have discoloration what does that mean ?
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Jun 11, 2020 2:11 PM CST
Gina, thanks for the correction! Until your post, I'd forgotten that fact. I think I recall years back on another gardening forum, a conversation with now deceased Steve Lucas of The Exotic Rainforest, discussing the hybrid Alocasia 'Amazonica' a/k/a Poly'. The first one I ever bought was labeled 'Poly'.

I just found the Exotic Rainforest webpage and I'm so happy it's up and running again! I tried to access it sometime last year and it was gone! I think I'd read somewhere (possibly here on garden.org) that the entire plant collection was now residing with someone else so I thought maybe his family decided to deactivate the site. I just love that site and all the beautiful Aroids that Steve grew so I'm happy to find it again!

His Exotic Rainforest page here https://www.exoticrainforest.c... states the following:

"Alocasia Amazonica (Incorrectly Alocasia x amazonica) A hybrid of Alocasia longiloba Miq. (formerly known as the synonym Alocasia watsoniana Hort.) x Alocasia sanderiana Hort.
The abbreviation "Miq." indicates the plant was described by Miquel, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm (1811-1871) Common Names: African Mask, Jewel Alocasia, Alocasia Alligator
Sometimes known commercially as "Alocasia Polly" or correctly Alocasia Poly"


If I'm reading his page correctly, African Mask (Alocasia 'Amazonica') and African Mask (Alocasia 'Polly') are one and the same plant and we should only have one listing for it here in our database?

His page does also say that the hybrid (bred from plants of Asian parentage) was traced back to the now defunct "Amazon Nursery" in Miami, Fl. and that the owner named it after his nursery business. Smiling



~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 12, 2020 7:30 AM CST
When older leaves die back it may be just normal aging. When new leaves emerge in damaged condition, it means there has been a problem with the roots from either recent repotting or improper watering. A photo showing how it is potted might prove helpful.

If you are watering it thoroughly, I would not expect it to need water more than once per week. How deep into the soil do you let it get dry before you water? I agree with Lin that your finger is probably a more reliable indicator than the bamboo stick.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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