Cactus and Succulents forum→Euphorbia Scarring--Normal or Not?

Views: 375, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
Name: Ginya
New York (Zone 7b)
Image
ginya703
Jun 11, 2020 10:15 AM CST
Realizing that I might've posted my question in the wrong place before so moving it over here!

I've had this ~3.5 ft. euphorbia for about two and a half months now and probably about a month ago, it started to have a massive growth spurt on all of its stems. However, I noticed a couple weeks ago that the top new portion suddenly developed what looks to be like tiny scarring and some of its edge pieces (the round pieces that surround each stem) are turning black and drying up/falling off. Is it sunburn? Underwatering? Overwatering? Root rot? Pests? Just to note, the scarred top portions still feel totally firm.

All of that said, this is only happening to the very top portion of my plant. The rest of the stems are still growing quite healthily (as seen in the other pic). It looks like some of them have some very, very minor scarring but it doesn't appear to be spreading in the same way.

Also, I have euphorbia in a very sunny westward facing window and have been watering once every three weeks. The soil that it came in seems pretty dense (and therefore retains water) so I've been waiting to water once it feels dry. FYI, the rocks you see on top are just a top dressing and not mixed into the soil.

Thumb of 2020-06-11/ginya703/76587d


Thumb of 2020-06-11/ginya703/bb8a32


Thumb of 2020-06-11/ginya703/b5f309


Thumb of 2020-06-11/ginya703/562441


Thumb of 2020-06-11/ginya703/cbb281


Thumb of 2020-06-11/ginya703/713b95
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
Image
skopjecollection
Jun 11, 2020 10:23 AM CST
This is not normal..not even normal as disease and pests go..
The only 2 reasons i can explain this
a-viral or fungal, or b, it stagnated and now its growing all of a sudden...
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jun 11, 2020 10:56 AM CST
It looks worrisome on several counts: the bare stem at the bottom of the plant, the skinny bottom trunk holding up the chubbier top half, the narrowing new growth and the webbing.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Connor
Boerne, TX
Smotzer
Jun 11, 2020 11:39 AM CST
Okay I have seen something similar to this before, not exact, but it actually looks like a type of sunburn and the breakdown of chlorophyll on the new growth. If it has been growing rapidly and new growth hasn't had time to fully harden off, this could be a possible reason.

Due to the fact that it is very uniform I do not believe it is a biotic issue at this time but think it might be more of an abiotic issue.
I would move it away from light for awhile and monitor it, if it continues to spread inwards and downwards then it could be a biotic issue. And if it was I would lean more towards the viral side, and less fungal or bacterial as they present in non uniform manners typically.



Name: Ginya
New York (Zone 7b)
Image
ginya703
Jun 11, 2020 12:46 PM CST
Smotzer said:Okay I have seen something similar to this before, not exact, but it actually looks like a type of sunburn and the breakdown of chlorophyll on the new growth. If it has been growing rapidly and new growth hasn't had time to fully harden off, this could be a possible reason.

Due to the fact that it is very uniform I do not believe it is a biotic issue at this time but think it might be more of an abiotic issue.
I would move it away from light for awhile and monitor it, if it continues to spread inwards and downwards then it could be a biotic issue. And if it was I would lean more towards the viral side, and less fungal or bacterial as they present in non uniform manners typically.


Thanks for the thorough response! I hope that it is a sunburn situation (albeit a very odd looking one) and that it's not biotic. I'll move it away from the light and keep monitoring.

I'm guessing there's nothing I can do in the meantime about the parts that are already scarred? As in, they're probably permanent?



[Last edited by ginya703 - Jun 11, 2020 12:47 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2270610 (5)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jun 11, 2020 2:24 PM CST
We don't even know what is causing the problem. Its not insect damage. Euphorbia do get viruses but they don't look like that. Sunburn also doesn't look like that. My best guess is some sort of weird edema. Moving it out of the light will only cause other problems. Do you check how dry the soil is before you water?

One more thought: DId you fertilize this spring? Maybe the plant is growing so fast, its getting stretch marks.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
[Last edited by DaisyI - Jun 11, 2020 2:26 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2270732 (6)
Name: Ginya
New York (Zone 7b)
Image
ginya703
Jun 11, 2020 2:45 PM CST
DaisyI said:We don't even know what is causing the problem. Its not insect damage. Euphorbia do get viruses but they don't look like that. Sunburn also doesn't look like that. My best guess is some sort of weird edema. Moving it out of the light will only cause other problems. Do you check how dry the soil is before you water?

One more thought: DId you fertilize this spring? Maybe the plant is growing so fast, its getting stretch marks.


Hm interesting. When I was trying to search for an answer before I posted here, I had read some things about plants' tissues swelling and splitting when overwatered but any photos I could find didn't look like my case. Also, as I mentioned, I've only watered it twice (every three weeks) since I've had it. I got it mid April and the soil appeared to be moist/just watered when I took it home so I waited and based it on me sticking my finger about 2 inches into the soil to see if it felt dry or not. What do you suggest for watering practices?

Also, I wasn't going going to move it completely out of the light, just slightly to the left or maybe a little further away from the window so that it's not receiving as harsh direct sunlight. Does that seem like it'd help or should I just leave it where it is?

Lastly, I didn't fertilize. It's definitely very rapidly growing and that part especially I had noticed was growing super fast but so are the other stems and none of them have developed scarring to that degree. Also, if it was stretch marks, I guess I'm wondering how that'd account for the dried up/dying little pieces around the edges.

Name: Connor
Boerne, TX
Smotzer
Jun 11, 2020 3:14 PM CST
While my recommendation is just a guess, the only variable you described as potentially problematic is that it gets harsh light in fresh growth. Really not much you can do, but with abiotic issues all you can do is manipulate its eviornememt. You could leave it exactly where it is and if it gets worse you won't know what variable it could be. @daisyl I wasn't suggesting out of the light completely just to reduce the harshness.

As far as watering goes, it's possible that the infrequency of the schedule a long with it a heavy watering when watered could cause edema. But I have never seen web like regular presenting edema.
So possibly watering a little bit less quantity more frequently could be an option to see if it could be a watering problem.
Name: Ginya
New York (Zone 7b)
Image
ginya703
Jun 11, 2020 4:01 PM CST
Smotzer said:While my recommendation is just a guess, the only variable you described as potentially problematic is that it gets harsh light in fresh growth. Really not much you can do, but with abiotic issues all you can do is manipulate its eviornememt. You could leave it exactly where it is and if it gets worse you won't know what variable it could be. @daisyl I wasn't suggesting out of the light completely just to reduce the harshness.

As far as watering goes, it's possible that the infrequency of the schedule a long with it a heavy watering when watered could cause edema. But I have never seen web like regular presenting edema.
So possibly watering a little bit less quantity more frequently could be an option to see if it could be a watering problem.


@Smotzer Noted on the watering!

So I'm struggling a bit with finding a proper spot for it since I'm reading that euphorbias like this like a lot of bright, direct sunlight. Do you think it'd be helpful if one, I moved it slightly to the left (so that it's not as in the window) but also put this perforated cotton sheath over the new growth so that the sunlight is somewhat dappled on those parts? OR the other spot that I could move it to would receive bright indirect light?
[Last edited by ginya703 - Jun 11, 2020 4:03 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2270822 (9)

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Cactus and Succulents forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "DAYLILY Starling"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.