Plant ID forum→What kind of apple trees are these?

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Portland, OR
sarabb
Jun 11, 2020 3:22 PM CST
I have two apple trees on my property. We just moved in a few months ago and I'm not a Gardner but learning. Can anyone help me identify these two trees?

This is the first one. I believe it might be a Hubbardston Nonesuch but I don't know for sure:

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This is the second one which I am trying to bring back. It has no blooms so I don't expect apples on it until next year if I can get it to come back. Any pointers?

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Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Garden Photography Plant Identifier
Image
Silversurfer
Jun 11, 2020 3:50 PM CST
1. Judging by the fruit and leaves it is Pyrus sp...a pear tree...(rather than Malus sp...apple.)

trimmed your pic below
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[Last edited by Silversurfer - Jun 11, 2020 3:57 PM (+)]
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Portland, OR
sarabb
Jun 11, 2020 4:03 PM CST
@ Silversurfer
Yes I was thinking that too. The guy that sold the house to us said they were apple trees but it was his parents house. I thought it was an odd shape for an apple to.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 11, 2020 4:35 PM CST
One is a pear but the second one is an apple.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Garden Photography Plant Identifier
Image
Silversurfer
Jun 12, 2020 2:47 AM CST
I didn't comment on 2 as it is almost impossible to name apples/ Malus.

In UK there is a National collection of 2200 varieties of apple trees at Brogdale and for a fee you have to send leaves and 3 ripe fruit to them and experts who have spent their whole lives growing and learning about apples, use their knowledge, reference book, colour charts, fruit skin colour, the smell from cut fruit, the texture, the taste etc etc to tell you whether your apple is a Cox's orange Pippin or Hubbardston Nonesuch.

Some apples in UK are now very rare and only found in a few gardens.
Brogdale try to preserve all these old varieties.

I would say to id an apple from a pic of the leaves is impossible...at best a complete guess.
..............................................................................................................

Quote.....
Apples – The apple is the largest collection at Brogdale with varieties coming from all over the world and almost every county in Britain. Apples can be sweet, sharp, aromatic, crispy, juicy or soft & creamy.

Varieties in Collection – 2200
Harvest Season – Late July – Late November
Main Harvest – Mid September – Late October
...............................................................................................

https://www.brogdalecollection...
Quote from link........
" Download, print and complete the identification booking form below, please remember to send with your fruit.

> Choose three ripe (not over ripe) fruit specimens and a shoot with representative foliage, all must be strong and healthy. The fruit should be in good condition as damaged, misshapen or poor specimens are very difficult to name. If possible the fruit should be mature and show the characteristic size shape and colour.

> Number each variety alphabetically (if sending more than one) and keep a personal record from which plant it was taken, as fruits cannot be returned. Apples and Pears are best numbered on the skin with a ballpoint or permanent marker pen. DO NOT use sticky labels as these can become loose in the post.

> Include as much history as possible about the fruit and tree and clearly mark your name, address, postcode and phone number and quote your membership number if applicable.

> To avoid damage to fruit in transit please pack in a strong box with loose newspaper, bubble wrap etc. DO NOT use boxes that have previously held strong odour or pungent products such as soap, as these can mask characteristic aromas and scents held by the fruit.

> Pay for your samples below (£25 per variety)"
[Last edited by Silversurfer - Jun 12, 2020 2:55 AM (+)]
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Portland, OR
sarabb
Jun 14, 2020 9:44 AM CST
Silversurfer said:I would say to id an apple from a pic of the leaves is impossible...at best a complete guess."


Okay thank you so much. I had no idea. Once I can bring it back to life, and it hopefully produces fruit next year, I'll see what the apples look like and maybe send a sample into an expert.
Port d'Envaux, France (Zone 9a)
A Darwinian gardener
Image
JBarstool
Jun 14, 2020 11:12 AM CST
Yes to all of the above...
Consider contacting OSU extension office, they may know of a fruit growers / orchardists workshop where fruit ID is done, generally in Autumn. They used to be more common than now, but I remember them being done in the Seattle area some years ago and wouldn't be surprised if this was the case, if not in PDX, then perhaps Eugene or Corvallis.
I find myself most amusing.
Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Garden Photography Plant Identifier
Image
Silversurfer
Jun 14, 2020 11:48 AM CST
I know zilch about pruning apple trees.
But it might be a good idea to get an expert in and give it a severe pruning..at the correct time of year.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jun 14, 2020 12:05 PM CST
Apple tree are a challenge to prune. If your local nursery or extension offers pruning classes, take them.

The peduncles on an apples tree last for years and years. The trick is to prune grow a healthy strong ttree while preserving the peduncles.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Port d'Envaux, France (Zone 9a)
A Darwinian gardener
Image
JBarstool
Jun 14, 2020 1:46 PM CST
DaisyI said:Apple tree are a challenge to prune. If your local nursery or extension offers pruning classes, take them.

The peduncles on an apples tree last for years and years. The trick is to prune grow a healthy strong ttree while preserving the peduncles.


Daisy is absolutely correct - learning how to do it yourself is best and easier than you might think. I'd be surprised if the extension office didn't offer a class (or know if one).
And it gives you an opportunity to use words like 'peduncles'.
Which is not related to that weird uncle you shied away from.
I find myself most amusing.

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