Vegetables and Fruit forum→Multiple Plants in One Spot

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Northville, MI
LucasB95
Jun 12, 2020 12:17 PM CST
So this year I decided to try starting my vegetable plants from seeds. To my surprise, I was quite successful and about 95% of my seeds germinated. The issue with that is that since I expected such low success, I planted about 6 seeds in each planter originally. My main question is, should I separate them? The majority of the plants were started 4/1 w/ the melons and such being started 4/14. My concern is that I'll separate them and they'll all die. I'm realizing that these "bushes/bundles" aren't growing as rapidly as some of the other singular plants. If they're all going to die by doing so, it's not worth it, but if I can "graft" them together or something or successfully separate them, that would be ideal. My concern is that splitting them could kill them, but at the same time, having 6 tomato plants in one spot could cause such a nutrient deficiency that I don't get any yield. I could really use some advise - Next year I know to only plant 2 seeds MAX per container!

SUMMARY: I planted a bunch of seeds per container expecting only a couple to germinate. Almost all germinated and now I have MULTIPLE plants (tomatoes, melons, squash, broccoli, brussels, etc.) that have have multiples in the same spot (i.e. 6 tomato plants from one central location).
Can/Should I divide the vegetable plants?
Are there certain ones I can and certain that aren't possible?
- If tomatoes are hardy and it's worth the risk versus if brusselsprouts are fragile and will die upon attempting
All the plants have been transplanted already
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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farmerdill
Jun 12, 2020 12:30 PM CST
Ouch! ok, tomatoes tolerate bare root transplanting, so those can be separated and transplanted elsewhere. so can broccoli and brussel sprouts, BUT unless you are in a cool moist climate you probably will not be successful this time of year. They do not tolerate heat. Melons and squash unless you can move an impact root ball chance of success approaches zero. Just snip off the excess plants. They are space hogs.
Northville, MI
LucasB95
Jun 12, 2020 12:37 PM CST
Thank you for the advice! I will definitely do that for the Tomatoes. As for the others, I'll just see what happens. With the melons, cucumbers, and other vining plants I have a pretty solid trellis system and enough space (with room to expand if necessary). Would it be beneficial just to keep them as is considering the space hog aspect isn't that critical, or should I still snip all but two per planting spot because of nutrient reasons?
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
farmerdill
Jun 12, 2020 1:59 PM CST
They will stunt if crowded. Melons require 12 ( bush types , cantaloupes) to 30 (Watermelon) square feet per plant.

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