Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 12, 2020 6:59 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
So this guy is giving away free tree clippings. The only tree I know to stay away from is walnut trees.

Anything else I should stay away from?

Pic below
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Jun 12, 2020 8:13 PM CST
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Bookworm Charter ATP Member Region: California Hummingbirder Orchids Plant Identifier
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Palms! We can't give away mulch down here due to palm seeds.
Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 12, 2020 8:20 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
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Jun 12, 2020 9:04 PM CST
Name: GERALD
Lockhart, Texas (Zone 8b)
Greenhouse Hydroponics Region: Texas
Around here, I wouldn't dare just take random wood mulch. We have oak wilt, and I have 200+ year old oaks. I won't even let a chain saw or other tool be brought onto the property and used.
Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 12, 2020 9:13 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
Yeah I went to check it out.

I was thinking the same thing. Too much risk. Plus, the guy said he didn't know what trees they came from. It was a like a culdesac trimming. Thanks for reinforcing that. My brain would've talked me into using it, and probably killing all of my plants as a result from some kind chemical or disease or anything bad.
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Jun 13, 2020 7:45 AM CST
Port d'Envaux, France (Zone 9a)
A Darwinian gardener
"Anything else I should stay away from?"
Moonshine.
Causes blindness.
That said - I may be on the wrong side of the debate here, but I would not hesitate to take that and use it for pathways.
I find myself most amusing.
Last edited by JBarstool Jun 13, 2020 7:47 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 13, 2020 9:49 AM CST
Plants Admin
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
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I get wood chips for my pathways too. Only compost is used as mulch.
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Jun 13, 2020 11:03 AM CST
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 38 years
Aroids Region: Florida Tropicals
There was free mulch here available after the double back to back hurricanes in 2004 from all the trees that fell. They just chipped everything up together regardless of species and made it available. Hello? Many people got much that was TERMITE and PINE BEETLE infested.
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Jun 13, 2020 12:39 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
JBarstool said:"Anything else I should stay away from?"
Moonshine.
Causes blindness.
That said - I may be on the wrong side of the debate here, but I would not hesitate to take that and use it for pathways.


The thread "Tree-trimmer, ROW Clearing wood chips for mulching????" in Vegetables and Fruit forum

People ask me... Stone, what's the best mulch?
I tell them to use whatever is freely available.

The above mulch is priced right, I'd fill my pickup truck and carry to my garden until the mulch ran out.

...And then ask when they were likely to have more!

Out in California... flammability might be an issue.

Probably need to research what is allowed in your neighborhood... re fire danger.
Last edited by stone Jun 13, 2020 12:42 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 13, 2020 12:44 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
So there's no compost. It says in the ad that there's mulch/compost. But he means that you can take the mulch to use a base to MAKE your own compost. So there's no compost. I was gonna load up all of the compost, but he told me, "it's just mulch."

I already have termites. Lol

But I just don't want to bring it back and then my plants die. Lol.
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Jun 13, 2020 12:53 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Can you see the mulch in this picture?

Thumb of 2020-06-13/stone/fa189e
(last year's garden) https://gardens-in-the-sand.bl...

In my experience... using the mulch on top of the soil... Prevents germination of unwanted plants, promotes moisture retention in the soil, and... very importantly, keeps the hot subtropical sun from burning the organic material out of the soil.

Just don't till the woodchips under until they've been on top of the soil for a year!

Tilling the woodchips under will harm the plants... leaving them on top of the soil is GREAT!
Last edited by stone Jun 13, 2020 12:54 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 13, 2020 12:56 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
Really? Your convincing me to go back and take some.

I wish I had more experience.
Not sure what to do. Don't want to risk my plants!
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Jun 13, 2020 1:03 PM CST
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
How large is the garden?

You could always do the comparison test...

mulch on a row of this one vegetable... another row of same vegetable left unmulched...

If you clicked over to the link I posted from the vegetable forum, you'll see that I was lucky enough to get 8 dumploads delivered (last summer), and still felt like it wasn't enough!
Last edited by stone Jun 13, 2020 1:04 PM Icon for preview
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Jun 13, 2020 1:05 PM CST
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
Region: Ukraine Dahlias I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Houseplants Tomato Heads Garden Ideas: Level 1
Plant Identifier Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015
I do the same as Stone and have never had any problems.
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Jun 13, 2020 1:28 PM CST
Port d'Envaux, France (Zone 9a)
A Darwinian gardener
stone said:Can you see the mulch in this picture?

Thumb of 2020-06-13/stone/fa189e
(last year's garden) https://gardens-in-the-sand.bl...

In my experience... using the mulch on top of the soil... Prevents germination of unwanted plants, promotes moisture retention in the soil, and... very importantly, keeps the hot subtropical sun from burning the organic material out of the soil.

Just don't till the woodchips under until they've been on top of the soil for a year!

Tilling the woodchips under will harm the plants... leaving them on top of the soil is GREAT!


Stone - Your garden looks fab!~
You are correct about leaving the chips for a year (or more), but I would not say tilling under will harm plants (though, like you I still would not recommend it). What doing so can do is rob nitrogen from the soil in the process of decomposing the fresh wood. However, this imbalance can generally be remedied by adding some nitrogen at the same time. I just mean to clarify that the wood (otherwise pest-free, etc.) itself is harmful to the plants.
I wish I had access to those chippings - I would definitely have better pathways, and with time as they break down, those paths would in themselves become better future garden beds. A very old-time garden 'guru'; it may have been Ruth Stout, espoused the idea of never leaving ANY soil in a garden uncovered by a generous layer of some/any form of organic material...I agree. Unfortunately I don't always practice what she (i?) preach. But I have good intentions. Oh, it's a theme - things that pave paths to, where?...wood chips and good intentions.
Sorry. I find myself most amusing.
I find myself most amusing.
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Jun 13, 2020 1:39 PM CST
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 38 years
Aroids Region: Florida Tropicals
Floridians use a he amount of mulch every year. Because our soil is basically just sand. But we use mulch that is property treated and pest free. It rains so much here a 3 inch blanket of mulch disappears over one summer, broken down by the wet, humidity and insects, and has to be replaced every fall
Award winning beaded art at ceinwin.deviantart.com!
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Jun 13, 2020 1:49 PM CST
Port d'Envaux, France (Zone 9a)
A Darwinian gardener
Gina1960 said:Floridians use a he amount of mulch every year. Because our soil is basically just sand. But we use mulch that is property treated and pest free. It rains so much here a 3 inch blanket of mulch disappears over one summer, broken down by the wet, humidity and insects, and has to be replaced every fall


Making a note:
"Don't garden in Florida". Mostly it's that bit about the insects.
Got it.
I find myself most amusing.
Last edited by JBarstool Jun 13, 2020 1:49 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 13, 2020 4:21 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
Haha
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Jun 13, 2020 4:39 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
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I use wood for the perennial flower beds, but for veggies I use hay.
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Avatar for SoulReaver009
Jun 13, 2020 4:56 PM CST
Milpitas, CA
I need to get my hands on some hay.

Perennials? So my calla lilies and amaryllis should like then, huh? And I have wildflowers growing next to them also. Maybe I'll just mulch that whole area with it. It's only 1.5 ft by 15 ft. That might work...
Hopefully they will like that.

I'm still unsure if I wanna risk it. Not with my calla lily. Hmmmm

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