Containers forum→Roses in Containers

Views: 493, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Zone 8a
Birds Salvias Roses Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies
Bee Lover Ferns Butterflies Irises
Image
OAP
Jun 13, 2020 1:46 PM CST
Hello,

I am in Zone 8a. I have very limited bed space, but I would love to try my hand at roses in containers for my courtyard which gets a lot of sun each day as it faces directly west. It bakes out there from June through September, sometimes through October. I have had a difficult time finding plants for that area, and as I do not want to dig up the lawn, I thought containers might be the solution.

Which roses would you recommend for profuse blooms, fragrance, and pest and disease resistance? Pictures would be a plus!

Thank You!
Fate gives all of us three teachers, three friends, three enemies, and three great loves in our lives. But these twelve are always disguised, and we never know which one is which until we've loved them, left them, or fought them.
~ Gregory David Roberts
Name: GERALD
Lockhart, Texas (Zone 8b)
Hydroponics Greenhouse Region: Texas
Image
IntheHotofTexas
Jun 15, 2020 7:32 AM CST
I've tried Knock-out roses, but they have not all been equal to the heat. Some are marginal but do bloom nicely with the temperature eases off. I have some red Knock-outs that are in the ground and don't care about the heat and almost never get watered and grow and bloom very well. I have an antique rose that was given to me, variety unknown, and it shrugs off the heat and blooms.

If you can work out a place for them to grow up a support, Lady Banks grow and bloom enthusiastically in the heat and just need some help with water in the very worst drought. I haven't tried them in containers, but I think they would do alright with some kind of creative support.

I don't give any of these even the slightest care, and I've never seen a hint of disease. None of them are very fragrant, though.
Zone 8a
Birds Salvias Roses Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies
Bee Lover Ferns Butterflies Irises
Image
OAP
Jun 15, 2020 7:51 AM CST
Thank you for the tips, IntheHotofTexas. I am nervous about roses because all of my life I heard they were so difficult to grown. I have grown the miniature roses in pots, though. I love roses so much that I think I must give it a go before I die. A friend planted a yellow rose bush just outside her front door some years ago, and it thrived. It grew very large, and she told me she never did anything to it. Said she purchased it at Walmart. Perhaps it was a Knock-Out rose bush or one of those called Proven Winners?

In general, are roses best planted in Spring or Autumn or.....?
Fate gives all of us three teachers, three friends, three enemies, and three great loves in our lives. But these twelve are always disguised, and we never know which one is which until we've loved them, left them, or fought them.
~ Gregory David Roberts
Name: GERALD
Lockhart, Texas (Zone 8b)
Hydroponics Greenhouse Region: Texas
Image
IntheHotofTexas
Jun 15, 2020 10:27 AM CST
I do it at the end of winter after all chance of frost has passed. It's not that they freeze readily but that I like them to have as little stress as possible. But I wouldn't hold one over in a store pot just to wait for spring. We hardly have any winter anyway. Of course, most store plants become available in early spring. But I know there are valid arguments for winter planting, mainly to get more roots established before heavy leaf load appears in spring. I think pretty much any time, other than in full sun in Texas August, so long as you watch and think and deal with situations that might arise, most of which can be approached logically.

And since you want containers, you're free to move them in or cover them in a deep freeze, which you might want to do anyway with containers. I think containers are very different in their demands on the gardener than in-ground. In dry weather, it is hard to keep them evenly watered. Container dry so quickly and have no other source. And with the water being contained, it's easy to overwater. Not really overwater so much, but stay over-wet longer than in-ground. And there's no giant Earth heat sink in hot summer or heat reserve in winter. You have to do more thinking for the plant.

I'm liking more and more the unglazed terra cotta watering spikes that screw onto the end of a drink bottle. Like a Forsyth pot, they let the soil take what it needs. without being an uncontrolled drip. If they aren't sufficiently attractive, they can just be used in the hottest months when the plant needs all the help it can get. Search WATERING SPIKES on Amazon.

There's also a pricey but interesting thing from Oyas Irrigation (see Etsy) and a much less expensive one from GrowOya which should work as well. There essentially a gourd shaped clay thing with a neck wide enough to fill easily. You bury them in the soil near your plants and keep them filled. The plants will send roots their direction, just as they would with any water source, and will take water from the soil around the gourd, which sets up the osmotic pressure that draws more water from the gourd until balance is restored. It can't over water or underwater because the plant is in control.

They are exactly Forsyth pot components, but there's no open pot on the surface. You can do a classic Forsyth arrangement, if you have room in the container for the clay pot. I like the "oya" stuff, because unless the clay pot in a Forsyth pot is quite large in relation to the container, it needs to be filled more often. And in a Forsyth pot, as Forsyth himself advised but many people forget, the plant (really cuttings more often) should be against the underground portion of the pot. It also let you lift the pot out and see if cuttings are rooting.

With the olla type waterers, you can plant closer to the narrow neck, and the plant roots will naturally be close to the water source. Of course, with the "oyas" you can't see the water level, so you have to learn how often to top it off. But they're more usable for in-ground, because you don't have that big open pot catching debris. But you could also work out some covers for the clay pots in classic Forsyth pots and probably save some money, since six-inch clay pots are about $5 a piece new.

I spent a lot of time on that because I don't think high air temperature itself does things like roses any harm, but it does dry out a container badly, and those things above can fix that. I could certainly see a line of roses in a long rectangular planter with clay pots of oyas set between them. I have some approximately 24"x8" containers with peppers in one and mint in another, and I'm dropping a 6" clay pot in the middle of each between the plants.

You can find information on the Forsyth pot on the Internet, although it will be misspelled "Forsythe." It's really just a clay flower pot with the drain hole sealed with a cork, silicone, clay, etc., and stuck into the soil to the level of the rim and kept full of water.
Zone 8a
Birds Salvias Roses Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies
Bee Lover Ferns Butterflies Irises
Image
OAP
Jun 15, 2020 1:53 PM CST
Wow, thank you so much for all of this helpful info, IntheHotofTexas! I am going to research all of this. For the moment, I decided to purchases some mini rose bushes as the local market had them on sale for only $4 this week. I will attach a snap later, but I purchased a pink, a red, and pink tinged yellow. I have raised these before from the 4" pots. I nursed them for several years, and they finally grew into a really nice size pot (about 8" diametre). I had them planted in pretty, decorative clay pots (not the ubiquitous plain clay pots, although I have several of those as well) outside my front door. Then, a neighbour who moved out came back and stole them under the cover of darkness one night. I could not prove it, so I had to just let it go. Since then, I have been more careful where I place my containers.

Roses are amongst my favourite if not my very favourite plants. It is high time I overcame my anxiety over planting them in the garden. My courtyard gets copious sunshine throughout most of the day. It is laid to lawn at present, but I am very tempted to try to start rose bushes all along the fence line now. :whistling:

I start planting and cannot seem to stop! Is is just me?? Hilarious!
Fate gives all of us three teachers, three friends, three enemies, and three great loves in our lives. But these twelve are always disguised, and we never know which one is which until we've loved them, left them, or fought them.
~ Gregory David Roberts
[Last edited by OAP - Jun 15, 2020 1:55 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2275016 (5)
Zone 8a
Birds Salvias Roses Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies
Bee Lover Ferns Butterflies Irises
Image
OAP
Jun 15, 2020 6:51 PM CST
These are the mini roses in the 4" pots I bought today. I plan to put them in littler larger clay pots this week. So pretty!


Thumb of 2020-06-16/OAP/cb9cdd

Fate gives all of us three teachers, three friends, three enemies, and three great loves in our lives. But these twelve are always disguised, and we never know which one is which until we've loved them, left them, or fought them.
~ Gregory David Roberts
Name: Luda
Seattle WA (Zone 8b)
Image
mishkab
Jun 15, 2020 10:55 PM CST
I just noticed this conversation and would recommend you to post your question on roses forum. I have limited experience with growing roses in containers but so far successful. There are many David Austin's roses suitable for big containers, groundcover roses like Flower Carpet or Drift can work pretty well and lots of mini roses like Children's Hope. It is mini by the size of flower but not by bush size. What is the size of your container and how often do you plan to water it? BTW roses are not so difficult if they have food, water and sun. Modern roses are disease resistant and vigorous and can flower non stop. Knock Out is not the only one trouble free. Kordes roses like Veranda series will be very good for containers as well as some short Meilands roses. There are so many possibilities.
Zone 8a
Birds Salvias Roses Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies
Bee Lover Ferns Butterflies Irises
Image
OAP
Jun 16, 2020 7:58 AM CST
Hello mishkab! I will visit the roses forum, thanks for the suggestion! I posted here because they would have to be in containers at this stage in my garden's history. The three I purchased yesterday will go into 8" clay pots today (I hope). I will likely have to water every day due to the heat here. I always water in the mornings, and then I check all of my plants again in early afternoon. Those that need another drink get it then. Just before nightfall I check them all again, and if they look a bit dry, I give them another small drink. I found that my plants do best if I water them a fair amount 2 or 3 times a day instead of drowning them once a day. It is a bit more work, but my garden is so small that I hardly notice it.

I have never heard of roses being used as ground cover! How interesting! Do these varieties also have thorns?? I appreciate the encouragement. I have always been a bit apprehensive about roses even though I adore them. I guess today's varieties are more hardy. In they old days (ahem!), roses could be a challenge. It was not easy to get them to bloom, and they were susceptible to so many problems including mould/mildew. I always felt they were best left to expert gardeners. It is always such a thrill to see rose bushes flourishing in someone's garden. Maybe soon the "someone" will be me! Big Grin
Fate gives all of us three teachers, three friends, three enemies, and three great loves in our lives. But these twelve are always disguised, and we never know which one is which until we've loved them, left them, or fought them.
~ Gregory David Roberts
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Bookworm Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California
Plant Identifier
Image
ctcarol
Jun 22, 2020 4:00 PM CST
All those problems still exist, but those folks on the rose forum can probably tell you which ones would be best and which to avoid in your situation. It would help to have more info about your location. Humidity and air movement play a big role in fungal diseases. Also how large your containers will be.
Zone 8a
Birds Salvias Roses Foliage Fan Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dragonflies
Bee Lover Ferns Butterflies Irises
Image
OAP
Jun 23, 2020 2:23 PM CST
ctcarol said:All those problems still exist, but those folks on the rose forum can probably tell you which ones would be best and which to avoid in your situation. It would help to have more info about your location. Humidity and air movement play a big role in fungal diseases. Also how large your containers will be.


I did post on the roses forum, thanks. Right now, I am going to stick with the three mini roses I purchased. I put them into 8" pots and nestled them in the beds amongst the plants in the ground. Folks on the roses forum told me they could go directly into the ground and that I should deadhead them just like regular roses.

I was at Lowes today still looking for clay pots and saw some beautiful roses that were marked down for only $8 from $20. I was tempted, but at the moment, I think I would be better off waiting to see how well my mini roses do. I have had the mini ones in pots before, and they did very well. I had two that each grew to fill a 10" pot quite nicely, and then then were stolen from the front of my house. I feel certain I know who did it, but I could not prove it, so...c'est la vie....
Fate gives all of us three teachers, three friends, three enemies, and three great loves in our lives. But these twelve are always disguised, and we never know which one is which until we've loved them, left them, or fought them.
~ Gregory David Roberts
Name: aka Annie
WA-rural 8a to (Zone 7b)
Sandsock
Nov 19, 2020 10:54 AM CST
I know this is a fairly dead thread, but I saw a you tube video about cutting out the bottoms of pots so that the plants root into the soil....it looks like it could be lifted and stolen, but it is actually rooted in the ground and much harder to steal....container stealing is a thing in England.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Containers forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by Baja_Costero and is called "Heart of darkness"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.