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Jun 13, 2020 1:55 PM CST

I have several hydrangeas at home but, aside from one I bought, they are all "strays" as I call them, meaning forced hydrangeas I got for free from relatives and other folks I know when they start to get ugly in June already. I nurse them back to health and enjoy.
There's one that has always got my attention because it carries both lacecap and mophead flowers.

Thumb of 2020-06-13/ElPolloDiablo/c668ab

Thumb of 2020-06-13/ElPolloDiablo/35e07a

This is now an old and huge plant (I should re-pot it but the new container would need to be very large) and it only started to show these two kinds of flowers three years ago but has been producing them ever since.
No idea what it is but I am pretty curious.

Thanks.
The Saviour.
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Jun 13, 2020 8:23 PM CST
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Azaleas Salvias Roses Plumerias Region: New Hampshire Hydrangeas
Hibiscus Region: Georgia Region: Florida Dog Lover Region: Texas
Hydrangea macrophyllas come in two "flavors" based on whether they produce mophead blooms or lacecap blooms. It would be extremely rare for a single hydrangea plant to produce two types of blooms so, it is more likely that stems from different plants got comingled when young and you are now enjoying the end result. You can do the same thing with much larger specimens although the comingling of roots works better when done using young and few stems than two separate, large plants. Enjoy! If you need to use a large container, consider a 1/2 wine or whiskey barrel.
Last edited by luis_pr Jun 13, 2020 9:04 PM Icon for preview
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Jun 14, 2020 2:19 PM CST

Thank you very much.

The strange thing is this was a completely ordinary Hydrangea until three years ago: the lacecap flowers only started appearing in 2017 so if it's some sort of mingled plant it surely took its time. Hilarious!
I don't think wine casks or whiskey barrels are an option: they are prohibitively expensive. Huge plastic pots, like those used for growing lemon trees around here, are much cheaper and I may end up buying one of those, but it's something I will do next Winter.
The Saviour.
Avatar for luis_pr
Jun 14, 2020 2:33 PM CST
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Azaleas Salvias Roses Plumerias Region: New Hampshire Hydrangeas
Hibiscus Region: Georgia Region: Florida Dog Lover Region: Texas
Yes, root competition for resources would affect it. The one with the smaller or weaker root system would not have the same vigor and growth rate at first. Makes sense that it would bloom later. Good luck with the large plastic pots!
Last edited by luis_pr Jun 14, 2020 2:36 PM Icon for preview
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