Houseplants forum→Collembola/springtails everywhere!

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Drainville
Jun 15, 2020 6:49 AM CST
Dear all!

I have quite a collection of houseplants, with very different soil types, buying sources, and care (especially watering) methods. I mostly have pothos, marble pothos, peace lily, iron cast plant, sansaveria cylindrica and its dwarf subspecies, and pachira. Therefore it's a bit challenging for me to understand why nearly all of them have these small, jumping creatures (most possibly collembola) in their soil. I know there are many species of collembola, so my question is rather general. I also suppose to know that generally these creatures like wet soil, however, I only give water for my sansaverias every three weeks, for instance.

Also, these creatures are light colored, very small, and living in the soil of the houseplants. When they feel disturbed, they'd just jump. That's why I think they are collembola.

Are collembola bad for the plants/the soil?
[Last edited by Drainville - Jun 15, 2020 6:50 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2274568 (1)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
Jun 15, 2020 9:01 AM CST
Springtails are harmless to you and your plants.

Do you routinely repot your plants? What potting soil do you use?
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

Drainville
Jun 16, 2020 10:24 AM CST
WillC said:Springtails are harmless to you and your plants.

Do you routinely repot your plants? What potting soil do you use?


Are they? Good to read that. Many self-made or real garden advisors over the internet tell the readers how to get rid of them, etc. I repot only the species I know that they don't get disturbed by repotting. Basically anything I own (see above) besides the iron cast and the pachira and the sansaverias, which are not preferring to be disturbed as I know. As for the soil, I try to always buy upper-mid category "palm and green houseplant soil" with generally high ratio of organic material in line with some EU law, so, I did not prepare it, just bought it. This is what I use when repot.

As for the others, the ones they haven't been repotted yet, they are all coming from various places with seemingly different soil.

[Last edited by Drainville - Jun 16, 2020 10:25 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2275939 (3)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
Jun 16, 2020 11:07 AM CST
They are harmless, but that doesn't mean they should not be treated. That's up to you.

They are most often introduced with new potting mixes that are too often contaminated, especially if the ingredients include, compost, bark chips, and garden soil.

Most indoor plants prefer to remain tightly potted in their nursery pots, not just the ones you referenced. You might save yourself some problems if you were to repot only when truly necessary.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

Drainville
Jun 21, 2020 2:12 PM CST
WillC said:They are harmless, but that doesn't mean they should not be treated. That's up to you.

They are most often introduced with new potting mixes that are too often contaminated, especially if the ingredients include, compost, bark chips, and garden soil.

Most indoor plants prefer to remain tightly potted in their nursery pots, not just the ones you referenced. You might save yourself some problems if you were to repot only when truly necessary.


Well, if these little creatures doesn't do any damage to the plants and the roots, and their growth (which I think is the case based on your comment), then I don't care, they can stay as long as they like. Smiling

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