Roses forum: Rose Rosette

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Cumming GA
Duncanks
Jun 15, 2020 7:25 PM CST
Can anyone tell me if they think this is rose rosette? I'm new to gardening and I really hope not!!
Thumb of 2020-06-16/Duncanks/b23975

Name: Luis
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
Jun 15, 2020 7:46 PM CST
Maybe; it is hard to say for sure without additional info. But I am concerned enough to raise a "yellow alert".

The amount of thorns is unusually high but, some roses have that many thorns too so, I though I would compare. Well, I could not compare it to many branches in the picture as those were too far away (only one had thorns and just a few, which is not a good sign). Can you compare to more branches? Are there any others with a similar amount of thorns? If not, I would go into a "red alert" and assume it is RRD.

New foliage typically does start red so, the leaf coloring per se does not bother me at all as long as these leaves are "new" and not "old". I have not seen the leaves develop so I cannot tell if they are new or old. The large number of thorns still does bother me.

I would let it be for another week or two and evaluate what it looks like then. RRD infected branches have a lot of growth vigor and they end up creating witches brooms at the ends of branches so, if your rose has a lot of thorns normally, I would see if this branch creates a witches broom or not. If it starts to create a witches broom or you have few thorns in branches elsewhere then I would go into "red alert" and assume it is RRD.

RRD is all over here and I have lost 3 roses so far. It is also in Georgia:

https://roserosette.org/
[Last edited by luis_pr - Jun 15, 2020 8:10 PM (+)]
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Cumming GA
Duncanks
Jun 16, 2020 7:18 AM CST
Thank you for the response Luis! I'm attaching another picture of the whole bush to see if that will help you. My plan right now is to keep a close eye on it the next few days and see what happens.
Thumb of 2020-06-16/Duncanks/3de929

Name: Luis
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
Jun 16, 2020 9:11 AM CST
Hmm, the other canes that I saw on picture 2 did not have the same density of thorns. Also bothering me is that the weird growth that you asked about is near a pruning cut that could have allowed the eriophyid mite to enter the rose bush.

If you want to and it is not too ugly looking, I would prune off both branches way down below. I am referring to the branch with normal density of thorns and the reddish branch with too many thorns. Clean the pruners well after that. Then keep monitoring the rose bush monthly or quarterly for changes (take digital pictures so you can compare). I am not sure if this will help since it may be already infected with the virus, but over here, I have been pruning and covering most of my pruning cuts with glue like the glue school kids use (Elmer's).

https://roserosette.org/contro...
Cumming GA
Duncanks
Jun 16, 2020 9:26 AM CST
Thank you Luis! I will try this. Yes I was wondering if the pruning of the old rose might have caused it to get infected somehow. Good tip on covering with elmers glue. Hoping this is will save it. Thanks again 😊
Name: John Hunley
E. TN (Zone 7a)
Rose_Insanity
Jun 16, 2020 12:06 PM CST
It is definitely RRV. There is a list I go by, but after seeing so much of it in my own garden (I'm surrounded by acres and acres of wild multiflora) I've learned to recognize it at a glance. In this case, there is the hyper-thorniness (I'm betting the thorns feel "rubbery", too, not stiff like they normally would be); the mis-shapen leaves; leaf stipules (the part that clasps the stem) much too broad; the new sprout is larger than the stem it comes from; there are thorns and bristles mixed...there is no doubt. The ONLY chance you have of saving the plant is to cut the affected part down as low as you can trace it, preferably down to the graft, or to ground level if it's an own-root plant. I've saved plants by doing this, with a success rate of about 50%. BUT, if the abnormal growth reappears anywhere else on the rose, yank it out.

I've had better luck with saving a rose when the symptoms appear in summer, rather than with the first flush of Spring growth. When it appears early, that means it went into winter dormancy already infected. That means the infection has had time to spread throughout the plant. When it appears later, in Summer/Fall, sometimes you can catch it before it become systemic. Regardless, I've learned that if abnormalities reappear after the first pruning of symptomatic growth, that rose is a goner.

So sorry, but these days RRV is just another thing rose growers have to contend with Crying
[Last edited by Rose_Insanity - Jun 16, 2020 12:51 PM (+)]
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Cumming GA
Duncanks
Jun 16, 2020 1:05 PM CST
Thank you for the response John. My gut feeling is that it is RRV. Just curious - I recently cut off the old roses that had died because I read it will help the new roses come back better. Do you think this left them susceptible to RRV? I'm mad at myself now for doing that because I feel like this led to RRV. I see the growths on three of the bushes (the biggest prettiest ones) 😢
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Jun 16, 2020 8:07 PM CST
Deadheading your rose did not cause the disease. It is carried by a tiny mite that floats on the wind and attaches itself to the nearest plant it runs into. That's why you want to seal the plant in a plastic bag before you dig it up and dispose of it in the trash, not the yard waste. You want to contain the mite so it can't get on other plants. The only way you could have infected it is if you had been pruning another plant that is infected and then didn't clean your pruners before deadheading this one. Always clean your tools before moving on to a new plant.

Deadheading roses does encourage new growth and bloom on repeating roses. Any type of pruning will encourage new growth and that is what deadheading is, pruning off the spent blooms. Deadheading on once blooming roses encourages quick new growth so it will have time to mature enough to set new blooms next spring.
Name: John Hunley
E. TN (Zone 7a)
Rose_Insanity
Jun 16, 2020 8:12 PM CST
You didn't do anything wrong. Deadheading faded flowers is standard procedure.

The mites that are the vector for the spread of RRV don't fly or crawl. They are carried by the wind. Where they land is mostly up to chance and the wind currents in your yard. They do not "enter" your rose. Wherever they land, they sink their feeding proboscis into the rose to feed, and that is how the virus is introduced, basically by injection.

Deadheading or pruning has nothing to do with the rose being more or less susceptible, unless a severe pruning *might* improve air movement around/through the rose. However, new growth IS more tender, therefore when mites land on it, it makes for a succulent meal. But you can't have a rose without new growth, or you soon have a dead rose anyway, lol.

The mites tend to fall from the air wherever wind speed drops. That means you don't want your roses acting as windbreaks, or planted too near something else that slows the air. Somewhere upwind of you (in a neighbor's yard, or a wild rose in a field) there's another rose that is infected, and the mites unfortunately blew into your yard.

EDIT: I see Seil posted while I was typing, lol. But everything she says is correct.
[Last edited by Rose_Insanity - Jun 16, 2020 8:13 PM (+)]
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Cumming GA
Duncanks
Jun 16, 2020 8:48 PM CST
Thank you all for the responses! So glad I came upon this forum since I'm a new gardener. There is so much to learn and I'm excited about it (even if some of it is learning about the dangers out there). Thanks again and happy gardening! 😊

LindsayG
Jun 18, 2020 12:36 PM CST
Luis's suggestion about covering pruning cuts with Elmer's glue is intriguing. It makes logical sense. Has anyone seen any studies re: whether this lowers the chance of RRD infection?
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
Jun 18, 2020 1:01 PM CST
The problem with that solution is that it is not perfect. The glue can degrade over time. I would hope that the rose -by then- can prevent the mite entry via that old cut. Another example: Rose canes have thorns. Wind can make one cane rub against another cane. The thorns on one cane can then make a cut on the other cane. And the mite/virus can then get into the rose via that injury or biting. The glue temporarily protected entry via the pruning cut but not via the cut made by the other cane.
[Last edited by luis_pr - Jun 18, 2020 6:25 PM (+)]
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Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Jun 18, 2020 6:21 PM CST
Sealing the cut ends will NOT prevent RRD. RRD is carried by an air borne mite. Sealing end cuts helps prevent boring insects from getting in the canes and boring down through to the graft and killing the rose. They are two separate things. If you wish to seal your pruning cuts do not use the kid's school glue. That is water soluble and will wash right off the first time it rains. You need a good non water soluble glue or, as I do, nail polish!

As Mike said, the RRD mites inject the virus by biting into the rose canes. The same way a mosquito can pass on a virus to humans by biting them.
Falls Church, VA
Irises Region: Mid-Atlantic Garden Art Dragonflies Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator
Bookworm Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Hellebores Peonies Roses
tantefrancine
Jul 12, 2020 9:41 AM CST
I just succeeded taking away all the roots of my very old Reines des Violettes, that had RRD. It was blooming perfusely in early Spring, this year more than ever with all the rains that we got, then I saw the red new pointy and narrow leaves and thorns /prickles. Immediately I cut all the ones with those away, and then thought, maybe if I cut all the way down almost to the ground, I did not remember whether it was grafted or not, but when new stems and leaves came out, It was still the same, so I had to take the whole root out, put in a black thick garbage bag and threw it in the trash bin, instead of garden waste bin. Since it was a very old rose, I had a hard time to get all the roots out, it had established in 4 different directions with long strong roots. But finally a day after a heavy rain, I got it out, I tried to take it out right after a heavy rain--it did not work because of the sticky mud that I have in my yard-So good luck Duncanks, I do hope you may be able to save it, if not, good luck in taking it out, but probably you are younger than I am, so you are stronger, and easier for you to dig it all out ----It is sad to lose a rose plant. Let's hope the other roses do not get RRD.
Cumming GA
Duncanks
Jul 12, 2020 10:31 AM CST
Hi, so sorry your rose got the RRD. And sorry it was such work to dig it up. I recently dig up some liriope and it almost killed me lol. Crazy strong roots on that stuff. Anyway update on my roses - I cut off that whole stem that had the crazy thorns as Luis suggested. I went all the way down and got it to where it started and nothing has come back on that Bush or the others that looked like that so my fingers are crossed this could have worked. I'm going to keep a watch on it...
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
Jul 12, 2020 10:57 AM CST
If the problem resurfaces and there is a good chance it may, get rid of it asap. It may now be helping transmit the virus to other still healthy roses.

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