Daylilies forum: Transplanting question

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South Australia
marie01
Jun 16, 2020 7:02 PM CST
Hello everyone,

When I go to transplant daylillies or receive new ones from a breeder should I put them into diluted bleach & water (- I read that this will kill any diseases)
Should I put seasol in with the water?
If so what would be the concentration per litre of water? and how long should I leave them in the bucket?

Appreciate any advice you give me as I don't want to burn them.
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Jun 17, 2020 5:25 PM CST
I have done it a few times, but did not keep up with the results to know if it actually helped. Many new plants from daylily vendors will have been treated with a fungicide before shipping to help avoid rust.
Pat Stamile has contributed this advice:
If there are any plants you are unsure of I would break off the outer two or three leaves right down to the crown. Leave no bits of these outer leaves. Cut the remaining foliage down to 1-2 inches and dip the plant in Daconil. If Daconil is not available use a 10% bleach solution or a solution of 2 oz. of Zerotol in one gallon of water. The scapes and plants will be smaller than normal but you should be able to avoid rust. Do not just cut the plants back and dip without removing the outer leaves. Dr. WW reported that she saw spores and pustules on these outer leaves which were only one half inch above the crown. Remember no treatment I know of can remove rust once it is inside of the plant which is why you especially need to remove these leaves and cut back the plants.

http://world.std.com/~mhuben/r....
South Australia
marie01
Jun 17, 2020 10:31 PM CST
Thankyou Seedfork for your answer, I'll try it and see
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jun 18, 2020 5:37 AM CST
Marie, you need to be very careful not to cut into the crown with the method Larry posted, there are pictures of how to do it here:

http://web.ncf.ca/ah748/newpla...

It's a fairly drastic procedure, are you in an area where daylily rust may survive the winter and you don't already have it? Since you mentioned Seasol I'm wondering if you are in Australia or New Zealand?
South Australia
marie01
Jun 26, 2020 8:35 PM CST
Hi Sooby, many thanks for your answer and sorry for my late reply, I removed all the plants from the garden bed so am starting with a blank canvas. Yes I'm in South Australia I'd say the climate is mediterranean, since my post I discovered that the plant may be rust free but this rust I mean the spores can arrive in the wind or even from other plants like roses.We get gully breezes. I know that a couple of the sellers have rust so the daylilly arrives with it and they trim off the leaves to remove it. I wanted to try the bleach method as I was told chemicals don't work but all the sellers I spoke with hadn't heard of it and advised me not to do it perhaps it's an American method? I saw a few orange dots on the leaves so assumed this to be rust and wasn't sure what to do..
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jun 27, 2020 4:45 AM CST
Yes daylily rust spores can be carried in on the wind but the further away the nearest infected daylilies are the less likely that is to happen. Rose rust does not affect daylilies, there are thousands of different plant rust fungi and each typically has a limited number of host plants. Daylily rust only affects daylilies and Patrinia, and no other rust infects daylilies.

Being picky, bleach is also a chemical Smiling The problem is that if a plant is already infected with daylily rust then the fungus is growing inside the leaf, so bleaching the outside of the plant will not kill it although it may deactivate any external spores it contacts. There can be spores lurking between the leaves that will not be reached by a contact dip. The more effective dip would be a systemic fungicide if there is something available there that is labeled appropriately but some of those work better than others.

Just so that I understand, are the plants you were thinking of treating with bleach plants you already have rather than new plants from someone else?
South Australia
marie01
Jun 28, 2020 10:14 PM CST
Hi Sooby,
The plants I wanted to treat were new ones, oh thanks for that - I'll try the chemical ones from Bunnings first, there's only a few orange dots.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jun 29, 2020 5:16 AM CST
Orange dots aren't necessarily rust although it's definitely a possibility. Are they raised above the leaf surface, and if you wipe them with a white facial tissue does it transfer an orangey smear? Can you post a picture of the orange dots?

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