Plant ID forum→Common tree in Gambrill State Park, Western Maryland

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Western Maryland
Ubertulip
Jul 15, 2020 3:48 PM CST
Anybody know?

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Name: Amy
Capon Bridge, WV (Zone 6b)
Region: West Virginia Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
starbookworm
Jul 15, 2020 5:39 PM CST
Are the caterpillars on the same tree as the fruit? The leaves don't seem to be the same, nor is the growth habit.
To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow. - Audrey Hepburn
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jul 15, 2020 8:26 PM CST
Tell us more.

I think I know what this plant is with those fruit and those shaped leaves.

But you have not told us anything.
John
Western Maryland
Ubertulip
Jul 16, 2020 8:11 AM CST
It is a common tree/shrub in Gambrill State Park in Western Maryland, photos taken this week. What else can I tell you?

ViburnumValley said:Tell us more.

I think I know what this plant is with those fruit and those shaped leaves.

But you have not told us anything.


Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jul 16, 2020 8:41 PM CST
Picture #2 looks like sawfly larvae gathered on a Smilax sp. leaf.

What does the whole tree look like?

How big or small is the tree?

What are the soils and moisture regime like in this state park site?

What are some of the associate species present with this common tree?

What I think it is would be a small tree or large multistemmed shrub. Observers would have noticed that not every plant has fruit present. It would likely be in the draws or ravines of the landscape, where moisture levels would be higher than on drier steeper slopes. It could occur on limestone based soils, but would likely prefer pH in the 6.0 range. It likely has tolerated a noticeable level of White-tail Deer foraging. If one had crushed a leaf and smelled it, one would have noticed a significant odor/fragrance shared by the unripe fruit if similarly crushed.

If you have any of that information to share, it would support identification assistance.
John

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