Plant ID forum→Plant, weed, tree?

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Bedford Hills, NY
agiorgianni
Jul 15, 2020 3:55 PM CST
Hello All

Not exactly sure what this is growing among the pachysandra. It's under a big tree, so I wanted to make sure it was a baby tree. I suspect it's a weed. Any thoughts? Many thanks!

A. Giorgianni


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Name: Kelly
Redding, California (Zone 9b)
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KellyFW
Jul 15, 2020 4:08 PM CST
Are there any thorns on the main stem? IF it is a tree it looks like Black Locust that is chlorotic and growing in too much shade.
Name: Amy
Capon Bridge, WV (Zone 6b)
Region: West Virginia Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
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starbookworm
Jul 15, 2020 5:10 PM CST
With it's low growth habit and appearance of shrubbery, I would actually say it's the Robinia hispida, "Bristly Locust". Beautiful flowers, but suckers abundantly.

To decide if you want to keep it: https://gobotany.nativeplanttr...
To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow. - Audrey Hepburn
Bedford Hills, NY
agiorgianni
Jul 15, 2020 5:32 PM CST
Ow! Yes, I went and checked. The main stalk has thorns, seem to be pointing upward. The main stalk and branches are green and delicate. I have three of these growing. So these are trees?

Thank you all! Sorry, what does suckers abundantly mean?

Should I pull from within the pachysandra and discard?

Regards,

A. Giorgianni



Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Jul 15, 2020 5:40 PM CST
What does the big tree look like that it's growing under? It does look like Locust, the highly invasive Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is found many areas of N.Y.



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Name: Amy
Capon Bridge, WV (Zone 6b)
Region: West Virginia Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
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starbookworm
Jul 15, 2020 6:19 PM CST
agiorgianni said: Sorry, what does suckers abundantly mean?



It means wherever you wound the plant a new branch will grow, or the roots will shoot out a sucker a habitable distance from the "parent" making for lots of little suckers ( Hilarious! ).

Locust is a super fun plant to eradicate. Ignoring its thorns, the roots are runner like and deep. If you don't get them all, you'll just get more locust since it can propagate via sucker.

Now that we know it for sure has spikes...Black Locust has two spikes that envelope wherever there is a new stem (and typically the new growth is red tinged). Honey Locust has only one (very large) red thorn on usually greenish stems.
To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow. - Audrey Hepburn
Bedford Hills, NY
agiorgianni
Jul 16, 2020 8:55 AM CST
These actually are growing under what I think is an huge old maple (produces red-orange wispy seed-like things in the spring before the leaves come out). I have no idea where Locust would have come from, though I rent a house on a small estate with many trees. But nothing that looks like a locust. But given that this is a pachysandra bed, I think I'll pull these before they get out of control (it's already been contaminated with Queen Ann's lace, which I've been pulling by the root and have pretty much under control, after a lot of work). I love pachysandra. Lots of it in an around the stone walls in Bedford, NY. Beautiful.

Thanks everyone!

AGiorgianni

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