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Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 7:17 AM CST
Hello everyone;
I have some tiny soil balls collected on the surface and every time I remove them or I even add black soil on the top , they come back again and appear!! I don't know what are they?? I'm afraid if there is an insect causing this!
Thanks in advance for your kind help.
Note: the plant is in a good condition.
(Please See image)
Thumb of 2020-08-26/Ranabadi/45db22

[Last edited by Ranabadi - Aug 26, 2020 7:19 AM (+)]
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Name: Big Bill
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BigBill
Aug 26, 2020 7:37 AM CST
Earthworms.
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CrazedHoosier
Aug 26, 2020 7:37 AM CST
It looks like some type of caterpillar excrement to me. Have you noticed any damage to nearby plants?
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 7:40 AM CST
BigBill said:Earthworms.

Thanks for your kind reply. :)
Can they exist in pots? How can I tray it?
Thanks again
[Last edited by Ranabadi - Aug 26, 2020 7:42 AM (+)]
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Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 7:42 AM CST
CrazedHoosier said:It looks like some type of caterpillar excrement to me. Have you noticed any damage to nearby plants?


Thanks for your kind reply.
No no damages at all. The plant looks healthy.
How can I treat it if it's caterpillar excrement ?
Thanks again
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
Aug 26, 2020 8:14 AM CST
Earthworms can live in pots all the time.
They eat through the soil leaving these roundish worm castings behind.
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NMoasis
Aug 26, 2020 8:34 AM CST
Not caterpillar frass, too much in one place. Earthworm castings more likely, but an unusual color and size. Maybe it's my phone and I'm not viewing the scale accurately, but looks to me like the cat vomited undigested kibble. Confused
For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 10:16 AM CST
BigBill said:Earthworms can live in pots all the time.
They eat through the soil leaving these roundish worm castings behind.


Many thanks for your information. How can I treat the pot and the plant?
Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 10:20 AM CST
nmoasis said:Not caterpillar frass, too much in one place. Earthworm castings more likely, but an unusual color and size. Maybe it's my phone and I'm not viewing the scale accurately, but looks to me like the cat vomited undigested kibble. Confused

Thanks for your kind reply.
Do you know how to treat earth worm?
I don't have a cat,,, lolz but it's really weird

Name: Lynda Horn
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gardenfish
Aug 26, 2020 11:21 AM CST
Earthworms, if that's what they are, are good for the plant.
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Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
Aug 26, 2020 11:25 AM CST
You do not want to treat the plant. Worms will help you. They eat soil, not plants!
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Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 12:18 PM CST
gardenfish said:Earthworms, if that's what they are, are good for the plant.

Thanks for your kind reply 😊
Good to know that
Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 26, 2020 12:20 PM CST
BigBill said:You do not want to treat the plant. Worms will help you. They eat soil, not plants!

Thanks for all your information. Good to know that they're helpful rather than harmful 😊
I'm relieved now! Thanks

[Last edited by Ranabadi - Aug 26, 2020 12:20 PM (+)]
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Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Aug 26, 2020 1:14 PM CST
Probably the elusive Midnight Skulker Wabbit. I tip my hat to you.
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
Aug 26, 2020 2:11 PM CST
Oh those wabbits are sure twicky!!!!
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Aug 28, 2020 11:05 PM CST
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ballengerjam
Aug 29, 2020 6:11 AM CST
It looks like 'snake' worms, or sometimes known as 'jumping' worms. They look like a lot like earthworms, except they have a white collar/ring around their bodies, further down than an earthworm. They lift their heads up, and seem to look around when you pick them. They thrash around vigorously rather than try to wiggle out of the light away from you. Dig around your planter and see if you don't have some. They seem to colonize and are in clusters. They live for one season, so you may have adults by now, and they have laid their microscopic eggs by now. They are invasive in the US, and rather than harm plant or animal, they rapidly destroy the leaf litter and disrupt the food web on the forest floor which has evolved to compost slowly with fungi and bacteria. They love too much mulch and random piles of leaf litter. I think they are ghastly. The New York Times' garden section called In The Garden by M Roache had a good, helpful article recently with some solutions from readers, including a mustard seed one. I am doing battle with them currently. The landlord dumped a huge pile of mulch in the front because of the silver maple's overbearing lateral roots, and the jumping worms probably came with the mulch. But that's another story....Pax,jb
Tripoli , Libya
Ranabadi
Aug 29, 2020 1:46 PM CST
ballengerjam said:It looks like 'snake' worms, or sometimes known as 'jumping' worms. They look like a lot like earthworms, except they have a white collar/ring around their bodies, further down than an earthworm. They lift their heads up, and seem to look around when you pick them. They thrash around vigorously rather than try to wiggle out of the light away from you. Dig around your planter and see if you don't have some. They seem to colonize and are in clusters. They live for one season, so you may have adults by now, and they have laid their microscopic eggs by now. They are invasive in the US, and rather than harm plant or animal, they rapidly destroy the leaf litter and disrupt the food web on the forest floor which has evolved to compost slowly with fungi and bacteria. They love too much mulch and random piles of leaf litter. I think they are ghastly. The New York Times' garden section called In The Garden by M Roache had a good, helpful article recently with some solutions from readers, including a mustard seed one. I am doing battle with them currently. The landlord dumped a huge pile of mulch in the front because of the silver maple's overbearing lateral roots, and the jumping worms probably came with the mulch. But that's another story....Pax,jb


Hello,
Thanks a lot for your useful information and help.

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