Post a reply

Image
Sep 28, 2020 1:06 PM CST
Name: Kat Marineau
Eastern panhandle WV (Zone 6b)
Mature shrubs, easily 10' tall, white snowball type flowers in spring. No berries, no thorns, no odor. New growth from ground and branches. Zone 6b. Unknown age, house built 1976, we are 2nd owners. The 2nd photo is spring 2016 after cutting out the dead wood that had not leafed out. The bushes are twice as wide now, nearly encasing the bird seed box.


Thumb of 2020-09-28/KatMarineau/7964d5


Thumb of 2020-09-28/KatMarineau/22cf03
Image
Sep 28, 2020 2:10 PM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
https://www.gardeningknowhow.c...
That might help. I cant really read it on my..phone
Plant it and they will come.
Image
Sep 28, 2020 2:34 PM CST
Name: Kat Marineau
Eastern panhandle WV (Zone 6b)
Thank you sallyg.
It's definitely tall enough to be a viburnum. We were thinking of doing a severe pruning, looks like it's too late in the season.
Image
Sep 28, 2020 3:24 PM CST
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Tomato Heads Salvias Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Peppers
Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Morning Glories Master Gardener: Arkansas Lilies Hummingbirder
It looks like a viburnum to me, specially the leaves.
Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today. Let us begin.
Mother Teresa
Image
Sep 28, 2020 6:03 PM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
yes.. I 'think' snowball hydrangea would have oval leaves. That should be easy enough to check (if I am right). Also I think viburnum has 5 petals, hydrangea more like 4 per flower

(("standing back in case I am wrong and ViburnumValley comes along and wallops me.."))
Plant it and they will come.
Image
Sep 28, 2020 8:18 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover Garden Art
Image
Sep 29, 2020 4:41 AM CST
Name: Kat Marineau
Eastern panhandle WV (Zone 6b)
So it is one of a few different Viburnums, my concern is how to manage it.
For 3 years I removed dead wood and mulched, not much else. I cut the dead wood out in the fall, then after leaf-out in the spring, some years I do it again midsummer. Yet it always has dead branches.
As we've added more flowers, annuals, perennials and shrubs on our nearly 3 acres, we've gotten a larger variety of birds. Every morning and evening I see them in the viburnums perching on dead wood waiting their turn at the seed feeder.
Am I doing them a disservice by removing the dead wood?
Is it normal to have additional branches die all summer long?
Do viburnums have a natural lifespan like trees do? These could be 45 yrs old.
Image
Sep 29, 2020 5:26 AM CST
Name: Sally
central Maryland (Zone 7b)
Let's all play ukulele
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: United States of America Cat Lover Birds Butterflies
I think removing dead wood is always good.
Plant it and they will come.
Image
Oct 1, 2020 12:08 AM CST
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Those are certainly Viburnum opulus 'Roseum', the sterile snowball flowered form of non-native European Cranberrybush Viburnum.

In my experience in Kentucky, a borer attacks stems of this species (along with the related native Viburnum trilobum), which generates the annual dead branches. There really is no good answer for that except to replace them with something that doesn't have this problem.

If you asked me, I'd suggest a really easy grower, the native Viburnum dentatum. Arrowwood Viburnum grows with abandon, will get every bit as big as what you currently have, but will have late spring white fertile flowers which when adequately cross-pollinated will produce dark blue fruits which birds relish. That means you should plant two different named selections of Arrowwood Viburnum, like an 'Autumn Jazz' and a 'Chicago Lustre'.

Following that plan, you will have attractive flowers, copious attractive fruit, bird food (which will drop the seeds to produce more plants), and reasonable fall color across the yellow/orange/red/purple spectrum. Not too shabby.
Image
Oct 1, 2020 3:05 PM CST
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
Garden Photography The WITWIT Badge Seed Starter Wild Plant Hunter Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
There is one good thing about dead bnranches: you are able to watch more birds, more of the time.
You can see birds when they are not in the feeder. With thick bushy shrubs, they will hide until it's "their turn" to feed. You really miss out, not observing their natural habits that are unrelated to actually feeding.

Not sure if this matters to you. When I grew up out in the country, we had a bird feeder, but didn't use it to attract birds so we could look at them. It was an environmentally helpful way to recycle old bread and assorted table scraps, trimmed animal fat, etc. into the natural ecosystem.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Image
Oct 1, 2020 3:11 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Region: Ukraine Region: Florida Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener Houseplants
~ I'm an old gal who still loves playing in the dirt!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot!


Image
Oct 1, 2020 5:33 PM CST
Name: Kat Marineau
Eastern panhandle WV (Zone 6b)
Hubby keeps the feeder filled with a gneral mx. I put a suet feeder in the maple tree once nights start getting cold. We're not proficient birders but can identify a few and our 5r granddaughter enjoys spotting cardinals and bue jays.When the large birds are around the smaller ones hang out on the bare branches.
Having dead branches makes getting a good look at a bird from our dining room a lot easier.
Image
Oct 1, 2020 5:40 PM CST
Name: Kat Marineau
Eastern panhandle WV (Zone 6b)
The viburnum dendatum bushes look a lot better than ours.
I'm planning to pull out the invasive snowball hydrangea this fall, have to pull it out with my truck. I could put a viburnum in that spot once I'm sure it won't resprout. Wait a year, remove one of the old viburnums, replace it, and repeat the 3rd year. Hopefully I can keep the wildlife happy and replace old worn out shrubs.
Image
Oct 1, 2020 6:06 PM CST
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds
Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover Garden Art
I imagine with fuller shrubs, you will attract more. Lovey dubby Birds also enjoy places to quickly hide, especially if a predator swoops by. Smiling
Avatar for barbrasande
Oct 3, 2020 6:49 AM CST
Name: Barbara Sanders

I believe it is a Smooth Hydrangea. We have several in our yard. If you look it up in the internet you will be able to read all about them.
Image
Sep 6, 2021 8:12 AM CST
Name: Kat Marineau
Eastern panhandle WV (Zone 6b)
Here we are, a year later, and they look worse. This summer a bird planted tree has thrived. Considering cutting the worst looking one to the ground. Any advice?

Thumb of 2021-09-06/KatMarineau/ce1815
Image
Sep 6, 2021 9:28 AM CST
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Agree with your idea to phase out the unproductive snowballs, and reinvigorate your landscape with additional fruitful viburnums.

Trees, and even dead branches stuck in the ground, will serve as bird perches for human observation. Birds will perch on just about anything, from fence wire to clotheslines to farm implements to muck buckets.

To preserve a dying/dead plant for that sole purpose kind of defies logic.
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.
Member Login:

( No account? Join now! )

Today's site banner is by Versicolor and is called "Golden leafs"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.