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Buckinghamshire UK
delboy1616
Oct 8, 2020 5:07 AM CST
Hello everyone can I be advised when to take some of the child plants from the the mother from my Sempervivnum. Thanks.


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[Last edited by delboy1616 - Oct 8, 2020 5:11 AM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Oct 8, 2020 11:25 AM CST
You can remove them when they are a little over an inch. Cut them off so there is as much stem as possible and bury the whole stem. If you plan to leave them outdoors (recommended for Sempervivums), wait until spring.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Buckinghamshire UK
delboy1616
Oct 8, 2020 3:06 PM CST
Thank you DaisyI for your kind advise, the plant live outdoors so I will until spring time next year.
Hurray! Thank You!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Oct 8, 2020 4:52 PM CST
You're welcome!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Julia
Washington State (Zone 7a)
Photo Contest Winner 2018 Garden Photography Region: Pacific Northwest Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Sempervivums Container Gardener Foliage Fan Greenhouse
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springcolor
Oct 9, 2020 7:06 PM CST
The thread "Harvesting chicks, how early is too early?" in Sempervivum forum

You might read this thread.
Sempervivum for Sale

SuzyQ22
Feb 14, 2021 1:09 PM CST
This is my first time posting. I live in western Pennsylvania, zone 6a. I'm new to semps. On a whim this past November I ordered 7 named ones from Mountain Crest (Beatrice, Paragon, Bronze Pastel, Mont Ventoux, Feldmaier, Killer, and Red Beauty) and about 80 rootless chicks (yes, I went overboard). I KNOW you all say put them outside, but for the winter I have kept them in containers inside in a large south facing window. They have done amazingly well. I only lost one rootless chick. They are growing and several are putting out offsets. It's been fun watching them. If I had put them outside during this miserable cold and snowy winter I would have never seen them.
I will put most of them outside in the spring, but my BIG concern is with the rabbits and deer. I'd love suggestions on how to protect them, but be able to see and work with them. I don't see any option other than keeping them in containers. My current idea is to keep them in containers on, for example, a picnic table inside my 4' backyard fence. This will protect them from the rabbits and the deer have not yet jumped the fence (I don't have plants of interest to them inside the fence.) But when winter comes back will they be okay in containers? Thanks for ANY ideas!
Name: Alex
Virginia (Fairfax) (Zone 7a)
Pollen allergies make me sneeze.
Sempervivums Sedums Region: Virginia Garden Photography Container Gardener Bookworm
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sedumzz
Feb 15, 2021 10:18 AM CST
Maybe netting?
Blog Thingy-ma-jiggy: https://sedumzz-garden-adventu...
Name: Sol Zimmerdahl
Portland, Oregon (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Garden Art Container Gardener
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GeologicalForms
Feb 15, 2021 1:20 PM CST
Welcome to the forum!

delboy,
Sounds like you've already gotten some good advice. My two cents would be that I like the stolons to be about an inch (~3 centimeters or so) when I plant chicks. They seem to have trouble getting started if they're under 2 centimeters in diameter, but they'll likely survive at even as small as a centimeter. You can always just leave them in the clump to, a well established reef can be quite attractive and should your large rosette bloom and die, the others will fill in the gap it leaves behind quickly. I only pluck chicks when I'm looking to spread the variety to a different location or to cover more ground.


Suzy,
I keep my winter buy's inside by a big south facing window till spring to sometimes, or at least till they're established. I'm not so sure what rabbits might do to them, but here in the city squirrels and birds are the problem. A thick gravel layer seems to stop them from plucking the rosettes or digging in the pots, might help with rabbits to. I keep my semps outdoors year round, theoretically most are hardy down to zone 5 or colder, but it's really case by case based on the variety and I find factors beyond temperature like moisture, soil, and sunlight are more of the issue. My semps are grown primarily in pots, I move them into the shade on 90F+ degree days to prevent roasting them and some of them need to be covered during the rainy months to prevent rot. They're a bit more sensitive in pots because the roots are more exposed to the weather, but they're tough plants and will probably survive no matter what you do. Don't be afraid to experiment and see what works in your climate! with 80 chicks it sounds like you've got plenty of backups! You should know however that the larger rosettes tend to be more sensitive than the smaller ones, so what works for a chick may not work for a mature hen.
-Sol Z
Buckinghamshire UK
delboy1616
Feb 15, 2021 1:45 PM CST
Many thanks everyone for the advise. Spring in the UK is a short time away when the ground softens up and invites me outside and get busy. I will take measurements of the rosettes and make judgement call to separate. Hurray! Smiling

SuzyQ22
Feb 15, 2021 4:18 PM CST
First, I apologize, especially to you delboy, for my post being a "reply" instead of a "new thread." My post was my first on ANY forum. I've learned now.

Sedumzz, thanks for the suggestion of netting. I have some and will use that if necessary, but I've had birds get caught in it in the past.

Geo, thanks for sharing your experience. I do like the idea of containers being movable to position the semps in the most ideal locations as the weather varies. I didn't know about the larger ones being more sensitive than the smaller ones. Very good to know. In all my research online, I hadn't run across that.
Mpls (Zone 4b)
johnmonno
Feb 15, 2021 4:35 PM CST
My recommendations are as follows. Plant your semps outside - that's where they want to be. Plant in well drained soil (lots of sand, pea gravel, chicken grit, etc) in sunny location. As far as deer and rabbits, I've had just a few issues with them although I have plenty that visit my property. They tend to do their damage in spring and fall when lush green growth is less available. Use a deer and rabbit repellent to keep them from grazing. Also cayenne power mixed in water and sprayed on plants will deter them. Squirrels are a different issue. They love to dig in my pots regardless of what is planted in them. I think they like the soft soil to bury seed in. They also seem to love to dig in peat moss. Cover your pots with wire or just put rocks on top of the soil to keep them from digging. As far as over wintering in pots, it can be a little tricky. My strategy is to bring the pots into the garage for winter (I'm fortunate to have a large window so they receive some sun all winter) and put them back out in spring. I have some success leaving pots out all winter but its been mixed. The cold of the winter won't hurt them, but come spring when the snow melts, the wet cold soil might. So I'm careful in spring when transitioning from cold and dry inside the garage to outside. Avoiding cold wet soil is the key. If you plant them in the ground, make sure the soil is well drained, cover them with snow in winter, and then shovel the snow off in spring. I've followed the routines outlined above and have excellent success over many years growing semps in mpls. It was -23 degrees here last night.


SuzyQ22
Feb 15, 2021 5:51 PM CST
John, thank you so much for your detailed explanation on growing semps in a snowy, cold zone 4b. Wow, -23 is cold!!! It's good to know about cold wet soil being a problem. I think I'll keep most of mine in pots and then experiment with placement when next winter comes. I have an unheated garage with south facing windows so some can go there. This year in western PA we've had lots of snow, but last winter we had very little so I can't count on being able to cover them with snow. My house has a wide overhang on the south side so I can place some of the pots there to keep them from getting too wet, and winters are mostly gray here so they won't warm up from sun. I do have them all planted in gritty soil so they have good drainage. In your experience, what is the best pot depth for semps? Does it depend on their mature size?
I don't have many squirrels, but have a few hungry rabbits and lots of deer. I ordered some deer and rabbit sprays and will try cayenne. The deer and rabbits ate my sedums down to the ground last summer.
Thanks again for the tips.
Name: Sol Zimmerdahl
Portland, Oregon (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Garden Art Container Gardener
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GeologicalForms
Feb 16, 2021 3:40 AM CST
Your welcome!
Always good to see new names on the forum. There's a wealth of information here to explore, more than you could find in any one publication. Lot's of experienced gardeners making contributions and adding to the fun.
Enjoy,
-Sol Z
Name: Lynn
Oregon City, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level
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valleylynn
Feb 16, 2021 2:34 PM CST

Moderator

Suzy, the south facing roof overhang sound like a great place for wintering your semps. If you do get snow I would do like John suggested, shoveling the snow over them. This will help to keep them from desiccating during cold windy weather. It can suck the moisture out of them. If no snow, you can give them a sip of water if very dry. Not on the leaves, just on the top of the soil. Just a sip, you don't want to water them. Let us know how the deer repellent works for you. Sometime/some places it works and others it doesn't. The bird netting will work and not trap birds if you place rocks along the edges to keep critters from gaining access to the plants.

I look forward to seeing photos from Suzy and delboy. Hurray!
Mpls (Zone 4b)
johnmonno
Feb 16, 2021 7:28 PM CST
I'm certainly not the expert on this site - just a guy who likes to dig in the dirt and grow things. As far as the depth of pots for semps, I have grown them in as little as 2 1/2 inches of soil in handmade cedar pots and they seem to do fine although I also use plastic pots of approximately 6 inches deep.

As far as the rabbits are concerned, they seem to be adversely affected by little bb's traveling at high rates of speed.

It will be interesting to see if your sedum grow back. I grow quite a few varieties and am continuously amazed at their ability to cling to life. I bet they will come back.
Name: Sol Zimmerdahl
Portland, Oregon (Zone 8b)
Sempervivums Garden Art Container Gardener
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GeologicalForms
Feb 16, 2021 10:41 PM CST
Sempervivum can be grown in minuscule planters, but they tend to be dwarfed if confined to a small pot. I have several potted up like this and they do last...
Thumb of 2021-02-17/GeologicalForms/14323a
Most of mine are grown in the standard 4"x4"x6" black plastic planters but I up-pot them when they appear to have filled the pot, if you want big plant's you'll have to go with big pots. The depth seems less relevant than the volume, I've seen roots on large plants trail towards the surface without going deeper than 4" before, sometimes they will grow big taproots if you let them though, it's very case by case and the varieties all grow a little differently.
-Sol
Name: Lynn
Oregon City, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level
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valleylynn
Feb 17, 2021 10:34 AM CST

Moderator

Growing in 4 x 8 foot raised beds (18 inches deep), I have discovered that some species/cultivars put down a massive tap root, and fewer shallow spreading roots. Well, massive as far as semps go. Some put down shallow, far spreading hair like roots to travel quite a distance and not much for a tap root. I should have made written notes on which does what.
I think all of them can grow in very small containers, with shallow soil.
I agree with Sol, when you limit the root space allowed the plants will not reach their full potential.
Romania, Mures (Zone 6b)
Sedums Sempervivums Region: Europe Roses
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PaleoTemp
Feb 17, 2021 12:59 PM CST
valleylynn said: I have discovered that some species/cultivars put down a massive tap root, and fewer shallow spreading roots. Well, massive as far as semps go. Some put down shallow, far spreading hair like roots to travel quite a distance and not much for a tap root.


That is I think quite a big difference, sound like different root types entirely, some photo examples would be fantastic, but then that plant becomes a test subject.


[Last edited by valleylynn - Feb 17, 2021 1:22 PM (+)]
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Name: Lynn
Oregon City, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level
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valleylynn
Feb 17, 2021 1:23 PM CST

Moderator

That is a great idea Paleo. Next time I am moving mature plants I will take my camera out with me.
Romania, Mures (Zone 6b)
Sedums Sempervivums Region: Europe Roses
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PaleoTemp
Feb 17, 2021 2:55 PM CST
That sounds great, Lynn.

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