Roses forum→What happened to my Rose?

Views: 447, Replies: 19 » Jump to the end
Iran
Image
Unknown_Gardener
Oct 22, 2020 12:34 AM CST
Hi friends!
What happened to my Ros?


Thumb of 2020-10-22/Unknown_Gardener/4e71f8
Thumb of 2020-10-22/Unknown_Gardener/34ff26

Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
Orchids, peace and beauty
Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
Butterflies Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Image
BigBill
Oct 22, 2020 5:38 AM CST
Exactly what type of Rose is it? It looks like a miniature rose of some type but I can't say for sure.
Plus the soil that it is planted in appears very dry.
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
Image
gardenfish
Oct 22, 2020 7:07 AM CST
Appears to be maybe a leaf spot or some kind of insect, pics aren't clear enough. I agree With Big Bill, looks very dry.
“ Be kind whenever possible”
14th Dalai Lama
Iran
Image
Unknown_Gardener
Oct 22, 2020 7:08 AM CST
BigBill said:Exactly what type of Rose is it? It looks like a miniature rose of some type but I can't say for sure.
Plus the soil that it is planted in appears very dry.


yes, miniature rose
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Oct 22, 2020 12:26 PM CST
What has the weather been like? If it has been very hot it could be sun burn. It needs more water.
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
Image
jerijen
Oct 22, 2020 2:10 PM CST
What Seil said.

It really looks to me like this plant needs more water, but I don't know what your conditions are, at this time, in Iran.
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
Oct 22, 2020 2:22 PM CST
It also looks like you may have some spider mite damage which also comes about when a rose is dry. Water it and give the leaves a good water also and check the back to see if there is some debris on them or any small red spider looking things.
Name: Daniel
Los Angeles (Zone 10b)
Image
Dciau1
Oct 23, 2020 4:51 PM CST
Not sure if other people would agree but maybe watering/spraying the leaves in the morning could help out with the dryness (:

Might knock off some bugs too

[Last edited by Dciau1 - Oct 23, 2020 5:05 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2370522 (8)
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
Image
gardenfish
Oct 26, 2020 8:34 AM CST
In a dry climate I think that would be fine. I don't dare do it here, we have too many fungal diseases.
“ Be kind whenever possible”
14th Dalai Lama
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Oct 26, 2020 8:56 AM CST
Lynda, there has been some research that says washing the leaves can actually help prevent fungal diseases. The thought is that it dislodges the spores so they can't take hold.
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
Image
gardenfish
Oct 26, 2020 3:25 PM CST
Very interesting! Hadn't read about that.
“ Be kind whenever possible”
14th Dalai Lama
Romania, Mures (Zone 6b)
Sedums Sempervivums Region: Europe Roses
Image
PaleoTemp
Nov 8, 2020 8:28 AM CST
seilMI said:Lynda, there has been some research that says washing the leaves can actually help prevent fungal diseases. The thought is that it dislodges the spores so they can't take hold.


This is interesting as after it rains substantially the fungal diseases seems more spread out than before rains.
I have been told that the fungi just get spread by the rain all over the garden.

Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Nov 8, 2020 11:17 AM CST
The fungal spores are in the soil. If it rains very hard those spores can be splashed up onto the leaves. Which is why black spot usually starts at the bottom of your plant and then moves upward. But the spores are also floating in the air and land on the leaves. Washing the leaves can remove those spores before the weather conditions are right for them to grow.
Name: Margie
NY (Zone 7a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner 2020
MargieNY
Nov 8, 2020 12:18 PM CST
seilMI said:Lynda, there has been some research that says washing the leaves can actually help prevent fungal diseases. The thought is that it dislodges the spores so they can't take hold.

OK - here's my story. In early summer, I power washed and stained a elevated deck. I have 11 roses planted below the deck, all in a straight line. Over the summer and to date, I have sprayed the deck with water about every 2 days. Inevitably the roses get sprayed also. What I noticed, is none of the roses showed any signs of blackspot. I wish I could state that as to the rest of my garden beds as I live in blackspot heaven. It seems as though, I can attribute the "control" of blackspot to "frequent" overhead watering that does not appear to allow for the spores to fasten to the leaves. The key word may be "frequent".
The pH of my water is 7.


Observe, observe, observe
We are fortunate to "see" & appreciate nature in ways others are blind.
[Last edited by MargieNY - Nov 8, 2020 12:19 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2378071 (14)
Romania, Mures (Zone 6b)
Sedums Sempervivums Region: Europe Roses
Image
PaleoTemp
Nov 8, 2020 12:41 PM CST
seilMI said:The fungal spores are in the soil. If it rains very hard those spores can be splashed up onto the leaves. Which is why black spot usually starts at the bottom of your plant and then moves upward. But the spores are also floating in the air and land on the leaves. Washing the leaves can remove those spores before the weather conditions are right for them to grow.


Very interesting, splashed up.
Do you think that the right amount of copper and sulfur in the soil (or on the top side of the soil) can be detrimental to the spores?
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Nov 8, 2020 4:57 PM CST
I don't know. I have never used copper or sulfur on my roses. If you think you are going to get rid of mold or fungal spores you can't. They are out there everywhere, in the soil, the air, other plants, everywhere! They are a natural part, and sometimes a very necessary part, of the ecosystem. The best thing to do is learn to live with them.
Romania, Mures (Zone 6b)
Sedums Sempervivums Region: Europe Roses
Image
PaleoTemp
Nov 8, 2020 5:54 PM CST
For example in the garden of my relatives certain trees were attacked by 3 fungal disease at the same time (can't remeber which they were exactly), while at the same time everything else had been also attacked, beans (leaves, pods, ect), tomatoes, etc. Those trees actually died, soon after, it was to expected barely had any leaves and the new leaves grow shriveled and infected.
Coincidentally lots of new soil was brought in from various sources to raise the ground level.
I was mainly curious about if the soil is poor on copper&sulfur compared to decent levels of copper&sulfur, how that impacts the level of infection. The roses were severely affected too, pretty much anything, wallnut trees, etc.

Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
Image
seilMI
Nov 8, 2020 9:00 PM CST
The only way to know for sure is to get a soil test done. Adding anything to the soil shouldn't be done unless you already know for certain that there is a deficiency and need for that particular compound. I have no idea what the soil conditions are in Romania so I can not give you advice on that.
Romania, Mures (Zone 6b)
Sedums Sempervivums Region: Europe Roses
Image
PaleoTemp
Nov 9, 2020 12:31 AM CST
Definitely not asking for an analysis of the soils in Romania :)
I thought there might be a theory behind it since the action of these elements against fungi is known, copper sulfate being used as a fungicide and these elements can be in the soil, compared to using contemporary systemic fungicides or *azole type of fungicides.
[Last edited by PaleoTemp - Nov 9, 2020 12:39 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2378418 (19)
Name: Lynda Horn
Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Eat more tomatoes!
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Container Gardener Lilies Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Zinnias
Organic Gardener Heirlooms Bee Lover Hummingbirder Echinacea Tomato Heads
Image
gardenfish
Nov 9, 2020 4:17 AM CST
I use copper on my roses to control blackspot; you just control it, once your roses get it they always have it. Copper has proved to work better than most other fungicides and does less damage to the environment. I will be washing the leaves off in the spring and summer, however. I've never done this before but from what I've read here that seems to make sense to me. Can't do any more harm; might help!
“ Be kind whenever possible”
14th Dalai Lama

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Roses forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by skopjecollection and is called "Aeonium arboreum"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.