Ask a Question forum→Bringing plants indoors! Need advice!!

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Albuquerque, New Mexico
JDizzle
Oct 25, 2020 11:51 PM CST
So it's starting to get cold and it's supposed to be very cold where I live tonight and there are some plants that cannot handle the winters in the state of New Mexico. I have several questions that I feel need to be answered in order to have the best success with these plants but also might already existing indoor plants. Some of you may have seen my questions regarding scale but I want to know if what I have on these plants is insects scale cuz I'm still not 100% certain as to what I'm looking for and what scale is. I have a general idea but I have killed a few plants I Believe by scrubbing what I think is scale off of them and it may not have been. Before I put these plants into the mix of my other plants I want to ensure that I I'm not setting up for failure I'm going to send pictures of the outdoor plants that I brought in and I would like to know if anyone could advise me as to whether or not I'm looking at scale on some of these plants. I I've also been told that safe and fine to use a spray bottle with water and rubbing alcohol I want to make sure that is accurate I have 70% rubbing alcohol but I was going to mix with water and clean and wipe all the leaves off but I want to make sure that's okay. Any advice would be greatly appreciated as always.
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Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
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NMoasis
Oct 26, 2020 12:22 AM CST
You're wise to bring in tender plants because it's predicted to get stinking cold in the next couple of days. Yikes. Mine came in today, too!

I don't see scale in your photos but it would help if I knew what I'm looking at. What is that stalk in the first two photos? It doesn't look great, possibly damaged., And possibly planted too deeply.

Second one, is that ivy? Lots of mineral and fertilizer buildup but I still don't see scale.

Both plants look like they are in garden soil (yes?) and in pots too big, which both need correcting for winter indoors.
Better photos necessary for more complete advice. Whole plant plus focused close-ups of problem areas, and please identify the plants. Thumbs up

For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
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sallyg
Oct 26, 2020 4:59 AM CST
I agree with Zoe.

I'll only add, ivy (Hedera helix) can be very finicky in a pot indoors and often gets spider mites. I think they very pretty but I don't use them as potted plants.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Oct 26, 2020 10:13 AM CST
Why would you take an ivy indoors? They are hardy to -20 degrees.

No scale. Scale easily scrapes off when you scratch with your nail, if it doesn't its part of the plant.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Albuquerque, New Mexico
JDizzle
Oct 26, 2020 11:56 PM CST
DaisyI said:Why would you take an ivy indoors? They are hardy to -20 degrees.

No scale. Scale easily scrapes off when you scratch with your nail, if it doesn't its part of the plant.


Ok good i think i was getting poor advice from someone because all the research ive done i can't pinpoint any such bug issues. So the ivy is ok to stay outdoors? I had no idea.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
JDizzle
Oct 27, 2020 1:33 AM CST
nmoasis said:You're wise to bring in tender plants because it's predicted to get stinking cold in the next couple of days. Yikes. Mine came in today, too!

I don't see scale in your photos but it would help if I knew what I'm looking at. What is that stalk in the first two photos? It doesn't look great, possibly damaged., And possibly planted too deeply.

Second one, is that ivy? Lots of mineral and fertilizer buildup but I still don't see scale.

Both plants look like they are in garden soil (yes?) and in pots too big, which both need correcting for winter indoors.
Better photos necessary for more complete advice. Whole plant plus focused close-ups of problem areas, and please identify the plants. Thumbs up



Thank you so much for your response and willingness to help. The stalk in the first two photos is a coleus plant and I do believe that there's a combination of gardening soil and regular potting mix. There is one humongous coleus plant that did in fact get damaged by the wind I was able to make about 5 plants from it in an effort to save all possible parts. Some of them are just straight potting soil and some of them a mixture of both. The ivy was pretty much dead plant walking when I had it indoors originally but my roommate moved it Outdoors into a bigger pot and it seemed to thrive I'm not very good with the ivy plants but I'm being informed that they are winter tolerant should I perhaps put those Ivy's back outside? I'm confident that there is no scale on the plants, however, I do have a red vein plant that I'm super worried about having scale and I have up close pictures that I will post here and apologies to anyone if this is some sort of duplicate post or if ive posted incorrectly as I often see comments about posts/questions being done wrong.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Oct 27, 2020 10:32 AM CST
I don't see any scale just what looks like mechanical damage, possibly from rubbing against the side of the pot. Leave the ivy outside -they make terrible house plants.

Next time you repot, stick with potting soil if you plan to bring plants in. If your native soil drains well and is loamy, not clay or alkaline, using it for outdoor only plants is fine. But the plants will do better in potting soil and, you don't want to bring whatever is in the garden soil into the house.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
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NMoasis
Oct 27, 2020 11:45 AM CST
JDizzle. Sorry to sound like a broken record, but we REALLY need photos of the whole plant.

Daisy is correct, your ivy can tolerate outdoor cold. They are notoriously finicky indoors, which is why yours was ailing until your roommate put it outdoors. Because it is in a pot, find a protected spot and wrap the pot with insulating material just to be on the safe side. Your photos show exposed roots above the soil, so I'd mulch the top of the soil, too.

I am no authority on tropical indoor plants, so I can't help with your red veined plant. However, for that and your others, if you are certain you have scale, use a systemic product like Bonide Systemic Insect Control and follow the directions exactly. If it isn't scale but some other pests, it will kill those, too. Won't cure diseases. Please note that I recommend a systemic ONLY for indoor plants, not outdoors. @DaisyI can better help with this — I'm not sure if Bonide is good for all indoor tropical plants.

Garden soil is not suited for use in pots. It compacts, doesn't drain well, and promotes root rot. It is especially bad for indoor pots, because you risk bringing in all kinds of tiny critters and their eggs and larva. Fresh sterile potting soil is the best thing for indoor pots.

Your coleus can survive indoors if you give it plenty of sunlight. I suggest taking cuttings and scrapping the parent plant. Put them in small (3 inch) plastic pots in fresh potting soil. Keep them uniformly damp until rooted, then water as needed.

Some snow yesterday, eh? Stay safe. Thumbs up

Edit: I overlapped Daisy. Agree.

For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
[Last edited by nmoasis - Oct 27, 2020 11:46 AM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Oct 27, 2020 12:17 PM CST
Bonide Systemic Granules. I have found a few tropicals the Bonide kills (African Violets) but the bugs did die and about half the Violets survived, now bug free. Smiling If you have plant munching pets, Bonide will kill them too.

We had a Nevada Nor'easter. Big wind, bitterly cold and not a snow flake in sight. Rolling on the floor laughing
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
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NMoasis
Oct 27, 2020 12:28 PM CST
DaisyI said:We had a Nevada Nor'easter. Big wind, bitterly cold and not a snow flake in sight. Rolling on the floor laughing


Saturday I was still in a tank top. Yesterday this moved in. Marley the cat isn't happy, but very curious.

For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Image
NMoasis
Oct 27, 2020 12:29 PM CST
Oops, forgot this.
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For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Yorktown, Texas
rknrl54
Oct 31, 2020 11:41 AM CST
When you guys speak of ivy being cold tolerant, is a regular pathos ivy (Epipremnum aureum) included in that ivy group?? I live in South Texas and thankfully it doesn't get anywhere near as cold as you guys but I still don't like to take chances with my outside plants when we possibly get temps below freezing.

Thanks in advance.

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Name: Suzanne/Sue
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Calif_Sue
Oct 31, 2020 1:10 PM CST

Plants Admin

Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is not an ivy. Minimum temps are 9B.
Your plant in your first post looks like English Ivy (Hedera helix) as some have mentioned. Better photos of the leaves would confirm that. Those are cold tolerant.
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[Last edited by Calif_Sue - Oct 31, 2020 1:10 PM (+)]
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Name: Gary
Pennsylvania (Zone 6a)
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MochaJoe
Nov 1, 2020 10:43 AM CST
Crazy weather here in southeastern Pa. Normal temps now then reaching 70 by next weekend and back to normal again. Even though my daylilies ( most of them) still have green leaves should I cut them back and mulch now? Thanks

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