Ferns forum→is this a tree fern?

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Name: CODY
Longview, Washington (Zone 8a)
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cwalke
Oct 31, 2020 11:24 AM CST

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found this at a local nursery with no tag on it and the salesperson didn't know what it was. It looks to me like some sort of tree fern but I'm not sure. Any ideas?
Name: Priya Patel
NJ (Zone 6b)
Birds Farmer Butterflies
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Ambajiji
Dec 9, 2020 12:15 AM CST
I have seen this one. I think it is known as tree fern. There are different variety. Found this info. Search for tree fern on this web site. ( tried to add link but as a new member I'm not allowed)
pistilsnursery.com
OUR FAVORITE TREE FERN SPECIES

Dicksonia antarctica: Also called the "soft tree fern," this species is native to eastern Australia. In their native habitat, they can grow up to 50 feet tall (!), but don't worry – indoors, they'll max out around 10′, depending on the environmental conditions (light, water, temp etc) and container size. We love them for their beautifully airy, bright green fronds and furry trunks.
Cyathea australis: This species' nickname is the "rough tree fern," because of the outcroppings on its furry trunk. But don't be fooled; it may be called rough, but it's a beautiful specimen. We love it because of the distinctive colorful "crown" that forms in the fronds, with darker green above and lighter green below.
Cyathea cooperi: This final species is also known as the "lacy tree fern," and is the species most commonly cultivated as an ornamental indoor plant. We love it because the fonds, as they unfurl, are particularly attractive, from tightly wound stems that become lighter brown and then green as they open.
[Last edited by Ambajiji - Dec 9, 2020 12:17 AM (+)]
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Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
CPPgardener
Dec 9, 2020 9:28 PM CST
I would go with C. australis. We grow the other 2 here as garden plants and that one doesn't look right for them. Dicksonia is more upright, less "wavy" and less fuzzy. C cooperi is much more golden-fuzzy and lighter green. I would imagine all of them need bright light to do very well indoors, I know Dicksonia and cooperi will.
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