Daylilies forum→Unusual Form

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Name: Vickie
Elberfeld, Indiana, USA (Zone 6b)
Bee Lover Garden Photography Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: United States of America
Region: Indiana Garden Art Annuals Clematis Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 2
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blue23rose
Dec 24, 2020 7:18 AM CST
@Seedfork, Larry, maybe the link below has been mentioned before, but I didn't see it. There is already a lot of good information and examples in this thread, so I'm not sure if this will clear anything up. It is a PowerPoint presentation in the AHS media library entitled "Shapes of Distinction" and is about the sculpted form. It is from 2010, so maybe it is too old to have included all the variations of unusual forms. Anyway, I just wondered if this would help any.

It is the 27th presentation listed in the AHS media library, about midway through the list.
https://daylilies.org/resource...
Vickie
May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Dec 24, 2020 9:21 AM CST
@blue23rose, Vickie
I have seen that presentation, it is actually teaching about the then "newly" recognized form, "Sculpted". Those are easy for me to understand, and Sculpted Relief is my favorite from of all forms. So those don't cause me any problems.
It is the Unusual Form and the sub divisions that am am having trouble with.
I wish somewhere it was stated why Cascade and Spatulate are not included under Crispate, why are they separate?
Crispate: Pinched, Quilled or Twisted.
Cascade: Long narrow tepals that hang down and curl like wood shavings? Is twisting and curling that much different?
Spaculate: Tepals that are noticeably wider on the ends, they looked pinched to me, except on the ends?
These are my definitions, off the top of my head, but that is how I understand them.
Name: Vickie
Elberfeld, Indiana, USA (Zone 6b)
Bee Lover Garden Photography Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: United States of America
Region: Indiana Garden Art Annuals Clematis Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 2
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blue23rose
Dec 24, 2020 10:14 AM CST
Good questions, Larry.

Like you, I do recognize the Sculpted Relief form, but I can't remember actually seeing it except in pictures, so it isn't one of my favorites. Maybe if I saw it in person, I might change my mind. I do like the twisted crispates and spatulate forms though.

I had 'Lemon Law' which is a UF cascade form, but I gave it away during my culling phase this summer. It just seemed droopy to me.
Thumb of 2020-12-24/blue23rose/580261

On the other hand, I have 'Eyes Bright', which is described as a UF crispate-cascade, but I don't see much of the cascade in it. I love this one!
Thumb of 2020-12-24/blue23rose/024f67

Vickie
May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Dec 24, 2020 3:34 PM CST
Glad you posted that description, because that sorta shows the confusion for me.
described as a UF crispate-cascade: So I read that as being a UF form, being crispate: either pinched, quilled or twisted (in this case I would say twisted), and also being Cascade (which I think really needs to be viewed from the side to see how low the tip hangs down).
My main problem seems to be between the crispate twisted, and the cascade. Notice in particular the way I read it cascade is not included in crispate, but pinched and quilled and twisted is included.
On the second bloom on the left I see one tepal that looks spatulate to me, but being I don't see it on two more of the tepals it would not be described that way. I seem to have two different types of spatulates in my mind, one with the pinched like lower part of the tepal with a short wider end, and one with a "natural" looking base with a wider tepal toward the end. In other words narrow at the base and wider toward the end but with out the pinching effect. It is hard for me to tell in the examples if I am even reading that correctly.
Name: Jan Wax
Mendocino County, N. CA (Zone 9a)
I'm a semi-retired studio potter.
Hummingbirder Region: California Dog Lover Irises Organic Gardener Daylilies
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janwax
Dec 24, 2020 4:00 PM CST
After reading this amazing discussion I'm assured that if I ever manage to come up with a fabulous new daylily from my amateur
pollen daubing, I'll know where to come to find out what I've got!
Happy New Year everyone.
Life is a Gift !
Name: Vickie
Elberfeld, Indiana, USA (Zone 6b)
Bee Lover Garden Photography Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: United States of America
Region: Indiana Garden Art Annuals Clematis Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 2
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blue23rose
Dec 25, 2020 6:55 AM CST
Thumbs up , Jan! It is an interesting discussion, isn't it! I am glad that Larry started this thread because I am learning things about my own daylilies as I look back at pictures. One thing I will do next year is get more side and back profile pictures of those unusual forms.

Larry, I did find one picture of 'Eyes Bright' that shows a little more of the cascade UF, but it is still just a front pic.
Thumb of 2020-12-25/blue23rose/d16897

And I am adding this one just because of those wild looking petals on that top daylily. Not sure how to describe that one, Smiling
Thumb of 2020-12-25/blue23rose/33bec6

Vickie
May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Daylilies Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Dec 25, 2020 8:00 AM CST
Love the photos.
I like seeing photos like that now because it gives me the opportunity to guess at how it would be classified. My guess would be that it would be unusual form crispate twisted. Even though I did see a description of "informal" bloom, just a description of a bloom that is sorta all over the place, "informal" was described as a sub-form.

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