Roses forum→Price increase at Heirloom Roses

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Name: Dennis Brown
The Big Island, Hawaii
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kohala
Dec 22, 2020 4:32 PM CST
Heirloom Roses have always been overpriced, but it's getting worse. When I started purchasing roses from them their retail prices were around $39.00. Shortly thereafter the prices for many of them were increased to $50.00. In today's email they have Abraham Darby, a David Austin rose, for sale for a pricey $54.00. You can purchase the same rose from David Austin for $29.00. In the past I have purchased DA roses from both companies and I can assure you that those from David Austin are far superior--they are larger and bloom much quicker.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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porkpal
Dec 22, 2020 5:48 PM CST
Eeeek!
Porkpal
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, New York (Zone 6b)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2020 Garden Photography Roses Bulbs Peonies
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Mike
Dec 22, 2020 8:58 PM CST
I made a number of purchases from Heirloom this past summer and fall, and their current prices don't appear to me to have changed since then. The most common price for their roses (which are own-root) is still $39. As for Abraham Darby, it's not currently available from David Austin growing on its own roots; presently it's only available from DA as a grafted plant.
[Last edited by Mike - Dec 22, 2020 9:09 PM (+)]
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Name: Dennis Brown
The Big Island, Hawaii
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kohala
Dec 22, 2020 10:13 PM CST
I just did a cursory review of Heirloom's prices and found at least 30 that were $46 plus. All of the DA roses were over $50. As for Abraham Darby, at least it's available from David Austin.Heirloom's Abraham Darby, as well as most, if not all, of the other DAs won't be available until after May 11, 2021.

The purpose for my original post was to indicate that David Austin sells better DA roses at a cheaper price than Heirloom. If forum members wish to purchase DA roses from Heirloom, more power to them.
Santa Barbara, CA (Zone 9b)
SusaninSB
Dec 22, 2020 10:49 PM CST
I'm a long-time customer of Heirloom, and have watched with horror as their prices keep escalating, particularly for the past 2-3 years. I guess they must be doing really well in terms of rose orders, b/c you don't increase your prices if no one is buying your product!
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, New York (Zone 6b)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2020 Garden Photography Roses Bulbs Peonies
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Mike
Dec 22, 2020 11:00 PM CST
I think you're comparing apples and oranges in terms of what's presently available where Abraham Darby is concerned. Heirloom offers Abraham Darby grown on its own roots, while David Austin only offers it as a grafted plant (it's not currently listed in their own-root offering). If someone prefers this rose grown on their own roots, they can't get it from David Austin. Regan had it for sale grown on its own roots for $26.99, but it's out of stock now, and other own-root nurseries that sell Austins which I'm familiar with - including Roses Unlimited and High Country Roses - don't offer it.

I agree that Heirloom's prices are higher than most other nurseries. They have always sold some of their roses for more than $39 - that's nothing new - but I still maintain that it's the most common price on their website. I typically order from them when I can take advantage of their free shipping (something that I think was mentioned on another post that isn't available for Hawaii). I also take advantage of the reward points I earn which enable me to knock $10 or more off my orders. I like working with them because they sell certain roses I can't get anywhere else (either own-root or grafted).

[Last edited by Mike - Dec 22, 2020 11:01 PM (+)]
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Name: Ken Wilkinson
N.E. GA. (Cornelia) (Zone 7b)
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KenNEGA
Dec 23, 2020 8:16 PM CST
It's kinda sad watching a rose nursery slit their own throat.
It's a rose!!! It has nothing to do with life and death.
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, New York (Zone 6b)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2020 Garden Photography Roses Bulbs Peonies
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Region: New York
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Mike
Dec 23, 2020 10:11 PM CST
Any business analyst knows that the price of goods sold - by itself - is no indicator of a company's pending success or failure if you don't have access to their financial goals, statements and trajectories.

So Ken, with that in mind, have you come to the conclusion that they are "slitting their throats" by analyzing their profit and loss statements for the past few years? And by calculating their rate of growth or decline? And by analyzing their business plan? And by looking at their customer growth, retention and satisfaction rates? And by reviewing their business model, their market niche, and where they fit within the competitive landscape? Because you've made a remarkably condemnatory statement that requires a great deal more information than knowing the price of their roses.

[Last edited by Mike - Dec 23, 2020 10:11 PM (+)]
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Name: Audrey
NY (Zone 6a)
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Rosykittycat
Jan 24, 2021 3:57 PM CST
Hi, Friends,
I am a long time customer if Heirloom Roses for 30 years and I have had much success with them, also., I enjoy DA roses, too.

However, Heirloom roses sells "only own root roses," in gallon pots. DA roses are mainly bare root, often grafted, but some own roots.

I check carefully to now try to only buy "own root roses," as they are more hardy in cold NY winters zone 6A and they live for my lifetime. So I really like buying from Heirloom roses because their own root roses survive my winters and will last me a lifetime. Worth the extra $.

Grafted roses may last 5-15 years and then they send up a sucker or stem of the original root stock which may be a Huey or Fortuniana rose which grows taking over your hybrid tea or floribunda or whatever your rose was. Huey us often used in grafted roses and when Huey takes over your whole Rose becomes Dr Huey Rose-a red wild rose-not good!

I have some grafted roses as I didn't know any better at the time and sometimes I can't find the variety Id like in own root. Grafted roses sometimes grow faster at first due to the "wild strong root stock," but are weaker in the long run not lasting but 5-15 yrs. Grafted roses are usually cheaper.

I'd encourage you to read more about grafted and own root roses to decide what roses are best for you. Less expensive roses often come in smaller pots, sometimes are grafted, and are younger as well as they may not last as long as a more expensive rose.

Anyway, I'd encourage you to enjoy Heirloom Roses as they have quality "own root" roses sold in gallon pots. They are growing the best in my yard at this time.


But I shop around at many nurseries to select own root roses, antique roses, and to acquire that special rose. I still love DA roses, too. I have ordered 5 DA coming in spring...some own root roses.

I also order from Rose Petals Nursery, Northern Rosarium, Antique Roses, Chamblees Roses, Roses Unlimited, and a few others. I hunt for "own root roses, " when possible.

Happy Gardening!
Kitty

Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Jan 24, 2021 5:23 PM CST
You know, Audrey, I've heard that about the good Doctor for years and yet I have NEVER had that actually happen in my garden. I have a few roses that are between 30 and 60 years old that were my Mom's. They are all grafted on Dr. Huey and not ONE has ever sent up a sucker on me. The only time I have had Dr. Huey come up is when I've lost a grafted rose to winter and not removed it in the spring for what ever reason. Then occasionally I have had him sprout new shoots the following spring. If the grafted plant is healthy and growing there is no reason to assume that he will take over. And if he does he can be removed and discouraged not to come back by destroying the root node he is growing from.

Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
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zuzu
Jan 24, 2021 6:44 PM CST

Moderator

There's also no reason to believe grafted roses "are weaker in the long run not lasting but 5-15 yrs." Hundreds of grafted roses in my garden are more than 30 years old and one will be 90 years old in a couple of years.
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, New York (Zone 6b)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Photo Contest Winner 2020 Garden Photography Roses Bulbs Peonies
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Region: New York
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Mike
Jan 24, 2021 10:43 PM CST
I have many own-root roses roses, and numerous grafted roses, and live in a region where the winter temperatures drop below zero. I've gone through many spring thaws where I've had to hard prune most of my roses to the ground because of winter die-back. All of the own-root roses have always come back just fine, as have the majority of the grafted roses. However, some of the grafted roses grow back a bit lop-sided due to damage to the bud union, or only grow back a few canes. And of course, I've lost a few grafted roses to winter kill.

The advantages I experience in growing an own-root rose is that: (1) I don't have to worry about winter exposure killing it; (2) I don't have to plant a bud union below ground to protect it from sub-zero temperatures; and (3) I don't have to mound the rose with soil or mulch for added winter protection, and then unmound it in the spring. That's a chore I'd rather not have to do for 150 roses, when I could be doing something else.

So if I'm planting a rose in an exposed location, I will generally choose an own-root rose. Otherwise, I'm not too choosy; it often depends on how I'm "bundling" my mail-order purchases from different providers to optimize shipping, or to take advantage of discounts.

[Last edited by Mike - Jan 25, 2021 9:01 AM (+)]
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Name: Audrey
NY (Zone 6a)
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Rosykittycat
Feb 7, 2021 9:18 AM CST
Mike said:I have many own-root roses roses, and numerous grafted roses, and live in a region where the winter temperatures drop below zero. I've gone through many spring thaws where I've had to hard prune most of my roses to the ground because of winter die-back. All of the own-root roses have always come back just fine, as have the majority of the grafted roses. However, some of the grafted roses grow back a bit lop-sided due to damage to the bud union, or only grow back a few canes. And of course, I've lost a few grafted roses to winter kill.

The advantages I experience in growing an own-root rose is that: (1) I don't have to worry about winter exposure killing it; (2) I don't have to plant a bud union below ground to protect it from sub-zero temperatures; and (3) I don't have to mound the rose with soil or mulch for added winter protection, and then unmound it in the spring. That's a chore I'd rather not have to do for 150 roses, when I could be doing something else.

So if I'm planting a rose in an exposed location, I will generally choose an own-root rose. Otherwise, I'm not too choosy; it often depends on how I'm "bundling" my mail-order purchases from different providers to optimize shipping, or to take advantage of discounts.



Name: Audrey
NY (Zone 6a)
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Rosykittycat
Feb 7, 2021 9:30 AM CST
Hi, Friends,

Wonderful to hear about your grafted and own root roses! I think I may have 20+ grafted in my garden of about soon to be 90 roses. I am happy to hear that your grafted have done well for 30-60 years...in your gardens... then I can feel I will enjoy my grafted roses....
and ideas about winter hardiness own roots. I have only lived in the cold NY climate for 4 yrs and I am trying to nurture them through winter better. I am mounding all my roses..own roots and grafted. I need to make sure grated are below soil!!!! I am still learning. Thanks!
(I used to live on west coast-so easy to grow roses there!!)

Zuzu, I am amazed you have "Hundreds of roses!!!!!" And one has been there 90 years!!!

Wow, my roses are brand new or 3 1/2 yrs old.... all just starting to bloom!
[Last edited by Rosykittycat - Feb 7, 2021 9:31 AM (+)]
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