Containers forum→What Type of Container Gardener Are You? - Part 2

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Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
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KFredenburg
Jan 6, 2021 12:55 PM CST
The first part: The thread "What type of container gardener are you?" in Containers forum

I had said in the first part (or did I?) that I would be creating a second part sometime soon...6 months ago. *Blush*

But here I am, back with a part 2. Enjoy, and feel free to tell us what type of container gardener you are, or what type of container garden you have!

Note: I included the types of container gardeners from the previous list, so that anybody new (meaning anybody that didn't post in the previous list/thread) can post here if they are a container gardener from the first list. The types of container gardeners/gardens that are from the previous list will be written in bold letters, and will be indicated as the old ones.


The list:
Old ones
#1: The Classicist: Formal Style:
Formal gardens appeal to homeowners for a variety of reasons: they reflect the style of a period or older home, they work well in small places, and they impart a sense of order in a landscape. Formal elements appeal to gardeners who appreciate simplicity and repetition. Additionally, a traditional garden plan is easy to lay out and plant.
Formal container gardens, like formal in-ground gardens, get their stylistic good looks from characteristics that define their style. In general, traditional gardens are symmetrical and balanced. Their design relies on heavily on structure, order, and geometry. To achieve these design objectives, think in multiples; repetition is your best friend. If you plant one gorgeous container, plant another one just like it (in an identical pot) to achieve a mirroring, thus traditional, look.
Since structure is a strong element of traditional style, a traditional container garden is all about pot placement. For example, in-ground formal gardens always have a central axis, such as a path. They also depend on a focal point, such as an accent plant, a sculpture, or a bench, to draw the eye inward. You can achieve a similar formal spatial layout by placing containers in a line, square, or circle. A container can be an element of a formal in-ground garden. For example, many formal gardens use containers as a focal point in the center of the garden. If you don't have space for an in-ground garden, you can create a formal garden using containers alone. Combine traditional plants with classic containers for a formal garden look in an entryway or backyard or on a condo or apartment terrace.

#2: The Romantic: Cottage Style:
Are you a gardener who thrills to the sight of lots of color, mounds of flowers, and cascades of foliage—all barely contained in the pot they are planted in? Then you are probably a cottage gardener at heart. Whether you adorn your front porch with big, blowsy pots of flowers, hang flower-laden window boxes at every window, or add colorful containers to your garden beds and borders, flower-filled pots can add romantic exuberance to your yard.
You can achieve a cottage-garden feel—in a container—by planting tightly, excessively, and with color and foliage show in mind. Combining plants of all heights, flower sizes, and textures will produce the most magnificent planters. Good container-planting advice is this: plant a thriller, a filler, and a spiller. Besides looking lovely to a passerby, romantic cottage-garden containers also appeal to wildlife on the wing.
For example, hanging baskets packed with red-and-pink fuchsia flowers will bring in hummingbirds; these flying wonders are attracted to the color red. Window boxes planted with zinnias, Pentax, and tithonia will lure in nectar-seeking butterflies too.
Consider fragrance when you plant. Many cottage-garden favorites are also sweetly scented, which adds to their romantic allure. Fragrant flowers and foliage include jasmine-vine, small rose varieties, and spice-scented dianthus.
Position scent-imbued containers near doorways and windows so you can catch sweet whiffs.

#3: The Individualist: Personal Style:
Let your personal passions and interest drive the design of your containers to express your own individual style.
Surround yourself with the containers, flowers, and colors that you enjoy. Personal style is sometimes referred to as "eclectic style", which means that you are free of any style constraints. You can mix modern with cottage elements, classic urns with country-style galvanized aluminum. You can't break any rules because personal style has none.
Personal container gardens showcase the gardener's passion. Do you love bright colors? Then pick containers in the hues that make you smile, and pack them full with equally bright-blooming flowers. Or are you fixated on just one color? Solitary color themes are easy to create—just choose containers and flowers of one hue. For example, do you like the formality of an all-white garden? Choose white containers (in any style) and fill them with white-flowering and white-foliage plants such as bacopa, dusty miller, and petunias. Is blue your favorite color? Then select blue containers and pack them with the vivid blue blooms of lobelia, fanflower, and blue salvia.
But, of course, you don't have to be either of the "personal style container gardener" examples that I have shown you above, because as I already stated, there are no rules with personal gardening themes and you are free to just plant and organize the way you like!

End of old ones

#4: The Modernist: Contemporary Style:
A contemporary container garden gets its modern moxie from many elements. The sleek design and distinctive form of the containers plays an important role. The size, form, color, and textural qualities from blooming and foliage plants add to the look. And finally, the placement and arrangement of the planters are essential ingredients in the overall modern effect.
When it comes to containers, simple is best. Square, rectangular, or rounded containers offer clean lines. The color scheme for contemporary containers can range from earthy tones to organic metallic colors. These subtle colors create a transition from your home's interior to your outdoor landscape.
Tall, upright plants, due to their textural leaves or distinctive growth habit, fit a contemporary garden design. That's why well-defined, symmetrical plantings are often selected for modern containers. Plants add architectural interest and structure to a container. Columnar plants include shrubs such as arborvitae or boxwood, some types of ornamental grasses, and standard or tree forms of shrubs such as butterfly bushes or roses. These plants offer vertical lines.
Cascading plants such as Burro Tail Cactus, Bacopa, Calibrachoa, or ivy also grow in a consistently well-behaved manner and can be used effectively—and artistically—in containers.

#5: The Cook: Kitchen Garden Style:
A backyard filled with containers full of all sorts of fruits, veggies, herbs, and edible leaves. Is this your container garden? Do you like to go out and smell that fresh smell of lavender, citrus, thyme, and more? The Cook: Kitchen Garden Stylist will love to have all of their containers full of edible plants (or plants with edible fruits or leaves), and will also love to use them when cooking in the kitchen.

#6: The Specialist: Theme Containers:
For every type of specialty in-ground garden—Asian, rock, or alpine—there is a corresponding way to create the same type of garden in a container. In some ways, specialty gardening is even easier in containers because these gardens are often intricate, complicated, and require a certain level of care. Tiny specialty gardens require less work than a large-scale specialty garden—merely because the space is smaller. The added benefit of creating a small-space specialty garden in a pot is that you can position these special container gardens where they can be admired up close.
Asian gardens, incorporating the clipped-to-precision forms of bonsai tree and shrug varieties, are lovely when created for tabletop decoration. Naturalistic and minimalist, these gardens create detailed landscapes in miniature. Asian garden plants include dwarf conifers, Scotch moss, mondo grass, and weeping tree varieties.
Rock or alpine gardens, which mimic alpine mountain scales, allow you to grow tiny species of plants that may otherwise be overlooked in a landscape. Alpine rock garden plants include low-growing sedums, creeping phlox, and primula.
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
[Last edited by KFredenburg - Jan 6, 2021 12:56 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2411751 (1)
Pennines, England
whatnots2015
Jan 9, 2021 2:45 PM CST
I'm an aspiring kitchen gardener. At the moment I'm growing chuckleberries, potatoes, rosemary and strawberries. I recently moved home to a place 50 miles away and managed to find a removal firm to take all my containers with me! I'm hoping to grow lots more in my new home :-)
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Aroids Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower
Bulbs Annuals Butterflies Cut Flowers Farmer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Image
KFredenburg
Jan 9, 2021 2:52 PM CST
Welcome! @whatnots2015!

Sounds like you could have some yummy meals at the end of the year! I wish you the best of luck with your plants!
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Bellevue, NE
Ceckery
Jan 20, 2021 7:52 PM CST
Is there an "organized chaos" group, or perhaps "garden overflow"? My containers are primarily whatever I can't fit in ground. Herbs are typically in pots which are scattered anywhere around my in ground garden. I'll have hanging things for herbs on the front porch this year. I'm planning on lettuce and carrots in pots this year to save them from critters and my heavy clay soil. Currently have a potted blueberry but it might get out in ground and mini roses put in its pot. Anything else I want will have to go in pots since my garden is full, lol.
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Image
NMoasis
Jan 20, 2021 8:41 PM CST
Ceckery said:Is there an "organized chaos" group, or perhaps "garden overflow"? ...


Hilarious! That's my category, too! Several years ago before I had put in my garden, I acquired several large ceramic pots and got into the "thrill, fill, spill" method. I must say I thoroughly enjoyed the results, but these days I'd rather use my plant budget for in-ground perennials than annuals. However, I do use lots of pots for leftovers and miscellaneous impulse buys. Some are permanently placed around the yard, others are for plants I'll move as the sun/shade locations change seasonally.

Last year I grew lemongrass in three pots, and it did amazing well. I added mint around the base of one, purple basil to another, and this one, calibrachoa. Simple and effective.
Thumb of 2021-01-21/nmoasis/53b21a

This was another simple one from several years ago, Karl Foerster Calamagrostis and an easy globe amaranth (Gomphrena globosa)
Thumb of 2021-01-21/nmoasis/f91d46

For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Aroids Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower
Bulbs Annuals Butterflies Cut Flowers Farmer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Image
KFredenburg
Jan 20, 2021 9:51 PM CST
Lol! That's kind of me as well. I think that's more the personal type. The personal type isn't any in specific order, it's your own thing. If your containers are overflowing and chaotic, there's nothing wrong with that! It's your own style. Even if to most people someone's container garden is ugly, the person who created that container garden would still be in the "personal" class.

Zoë ~ beautiful contrasting! The bright colors with the green really get me.
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Image
NMoasis
Jan 20, 2021 11:00 PM CST
Thank You! Kim! Nothing exotic or rare, but it worked for me. Thumbs up
For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Name: Susan
Zone 10a (Zone 10a)

Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Hibiscus Hummingbirder Butterflies Region: Florida
Tropicals Birds Dog Lover
Image
gardenersdetective
Feb 2, 2021 7:40 AM CST
I moved to Southwest Florida from MO where I was a huge container gardener. Starting from scratch I trialed many tropical plant and discovered beautiful easy care bromeliads. I wasn't going to garden here due to the heat but I have officially become a Bromeliad addict.
Thumb of 2021-02-02/gardenersdetective/e84f78


Thumb of 2021-02-02/gardenersdetective/c0e2c8


Thumb of 2021-02-02/gardenersdetective/0f2002


Thumb of 2021-02-02/gardenersdetective/988e4d
Thumb of 2021-02-02/gardenersdetective/2cfb32
Thumb of 2021-02-02/gardenersdetective/20e3f0

Name: BetNC
Henderson County, NC (Zone 7a)
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Tomato Heads Annuals Hellebores Plant and/or Seed Trader
Container Gardener
Image
BetNC
Feb 2, 2021 10:38 AM CST
My container gardens are . . . . .. practical??. . . functional?. . . (what's a nice word for "cheap"?)

Anyway, my plants don't care . . as long as they're well-cared for and have enough room!!! Thumbs up
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Aroids Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower
Bulbs Annuals Butterflies Cut Flowers Farmer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Image
KFredenburg
Feb 2, 2021 12:49 PM CST
Susan ~ beautiful container garden. I really like the variety of plants you have.

Bet ~ if it doesn't really belong in a category, then it always will belong in the personal category. It's the way you like it (and your plants), so who cares if it's maybe cheap? Smiling
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Name: Chip
Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming (Zone 3a)
Image
subarctic
Feb 2, 2021 1:01 PM CST
In a 4-season greenhouse, I grow mostly in containers: strictly utilitarian. Tomatoes, peppers, etc. go in those black nursery pots with twine trellises where needed.
Thumb of 2021-02-02/subarctic/d9d1cf
Herbs in plastic windowboxes.
Thumb of 2021-02-02/subarctic/62ae6d
And berries in hanging pots.
Thumb of 2021-02-02/subarctic/038ff1
During the warm months, I relocate the hanging pots to the floor.





Oxypot
Feb 3, 2021 12:55 AM CST
KFredenburg said:The first part: The thread "What type of container gardener are you?" in Containers forum

I had said in the first part (or did I?) that I would be creating a second part sometime soon...6 months ago. *Blush*

But here I am, back with a part 2. Enjoy, and feel free to tell us what type of container gardener you are, or what type of container garden you have!

Note: I included the types of container gardeners from the previous list, so that anybody new (meaning anybody that didn't post in the previous list/thread) can post here if they are a container gardener from the first list. The types of container gardeners/gardens that are from the previous list will be written in bold letters, and will be indicated as the old ones.


The list:
Old ones
#1: The Classicist: Formal Style:
Formal gardens appeal to homeowners for a variety of reasons: they reflect the style of a period or older home, they work well in small places, and they impart a sense of order in a landscape. Formal elements appeal to gardeners who appreciate simplicity and repetition. Additionally, a traditional garden plan is easy to lay out and plant.
Formal container gardens, like formal in-ground gardens, get their stylistic good looks from characteristics that define their style. In general, traditional gardens are symmetrical and balanced. Their design relies on heavily on structure, order, and geometry. To achieve these design objectives, think in multiples; repetition is your best friend. If you plant one gorgeous container, plant another one just like it (in an identical pot) to achieve a mirroring, thus traditional, look.
Since structure is a strong element of traditional style, a traditional container garden is all about pot placement. For example, in-ground formal gardens always have a central axis, such as a path. They also depend on a focal point, such as an accent plant, a sculpture, or a bench, to draw the eye inward. You can achieve a similar formal spatial layout by placing containers in a line, square, or circle. A container can be an element of a formal in-ground garden. For example, many formal gardens use containers as a focal point in the center of the garden. If you don't have space for an in-ground garden, you can create a formal garden using containers alone. Combine traditional plants with classic containers for a formal garden look in an entryway or backyard or on a condo or apartment terrace.

#2: The Romantic: Cottage Style:
Are you a gardener who thrills to the sight of lots of color, mounds of flowers, and cascades of foliage—all barely contained in the pot they are planted in? Then you are probably a cottage gardener at heart. Whether you adorn your front porch with big, blowsy pots of flowers, hang flower-laden window boxes at every window, or add colorful containers to your garden beds and borders, flower-filled pots can add romantic exuberance to your yard.
You can achieve a cottage-garden feel—in a container—by planting tightly, excessively, and with color and foliage show in mind. Combining plants of all heights, flower sizes, and textures will produce the most magnificent planters. Good container-planting advice is this: plant a thriller, a filler, and a spiller. Besides looking lovely to a passerby, romantic cottage-garden containers also appeal to wildlife on the wing.
For example, hanging baskets packed with red-and-pink fuchsia flowers will bring in hummingbirds; these flying wonders are attracted to the color red. Window boxes planted with zinnias, Pentax, and tithonia will lure in nectar-seeking butterflies too.
Consider fragrance when you plant. Many cottage-garden favorites are also sweetly scented, which adds to their romantic allure. Fragrant flowers and foliage include jasmine-vine, small rose varieties, and spice-scented dianthus.
Position scent-imbued containers near doorways and windows so you can catch sweet whiffs.

#3: The Individualist: Personal Style:
Let your personal passions and interest drive the design of your containers to express your own individual style.
Surround yourself with the containers, flowers, and colors that you enjoy. Personal style is sometimes referred to as "eclectic style", which means that you are free of any style constraints. You can mix modern with cottage elements, classic urns with country-style galvanized aluminum. You can't break any rules because personal style has none.
Personal container gardens showcase the gardener's passion. Do you love bright colors? Then pick containers in the hues that make you smile, and pack them full with equally bright-blooming flowers. Or are you fixated on just one color? Solitary color themes are easy to create—just choose containers and flowers of one hue. For example, do you like the formality of an all-white garden? Choose white containers (in any style) and fill them with white-flowering and white-foliage plants such as bacopa, dusty miller, and petunias. Is blue your favorite color? Then select blue containers and pack them with the vivid blue blooms of lobelia, fanflower, and blue salvia.
But, of course, you don't have to be either of the "personal style container gardener" examples that I have shown you above, because as I already stated, there are no rules with personal gardening themes and you are free to just plant and organize the way you like!

End of old ones

#4: The Modernist: Contemporary Style:
A contemporary container garden gets its modern moxie from many elements. The sleek design and distinctive form of the containers plays an important role. The size, form, color, and textural qualities from blooming and foliage plants add to the look. And finally, the placement and arrangement of the planters are essential ingredients in the overall modern effect.
When it comes to containers, simple is best. Square, rectangular, or rounded containers offer clean lines. The color scheme for contemporary containers can range from earthy tones to organic metallic colors. These subtle colors create a transition from your home's interior to your outdoor landscape.
Tall, upright plants, due to their textural leaves or distinctive growth habit, fit a contemporary garden design. That's why well-defined, symmetrical plantings are often selected for modern containers. Plants add architectural interest and structure to a container. Columnar plants include shrubs such as arborvitae or boxwood, some types of ornamental grasses, and standard or tree forms of shrubs such as butterfly bushes or roses. These plants offer vertical lines.
Cascading plants such as Burro Tail Cactus, Bacopa, Calibrachoa, or ivy also grow in a consistently well-behaved manner and can be used effectively—and artistically—in containers.

#5: The Cook: Kitchen Garden Style:
A backyard filled with containers full of all sorts of fruits, veggies, herbs, and edible leaves. Is this your container garden? Do you like to go out and smell that fresh smell of lavender, citrus, thyme, and more? The Cook: Kitchen Garden Stylist will love to have all of their containers full of edible plants (or plants with edible fruits or leaves), and will also love to use them when cooking in the kitchen.

#6: The Specialist: Theme Containers:
For every type of specialty in-ground garden—Asian, rock, or alpine—there is a corresponding way to create the same type of garden in a container. In some ways, specialty gardening is even easier in containers because these gardens are often intricate, complicated, and require a certain level of care. Tiny specialty gardens require less work than a large-scale specialty garden—merely because space is smaller. The added benefit of creating a small-space specialty garden in a pot is that you can position these special container gardens where they can be admired up close.
Asian gardens, incorporating the clipped-to-precision forms of bonsai tree and shrug varieties, are lovely when created for tabletop decoration. Naturalistic and minimalist, these gardens create detailed landscapes in miniature. Asian garden plants include dwarf conifers, Scotch moss, mondo grass, and weeping tree varieties.
Rock or alpine gardens, which mimic alpine mountain scales, allow you to grow tiny species of plants that may otherwise be overlooked in a landscape. Alpine rock garden plants include low-growing sedums, creeping phlox, and primula.

Fabric pots: A step towards eco-friendly gardening.
Everyone needs to use organic pots that are made of geo fabric. Fabric pots are breathable in nature and also self-pruning. These pots require very small spaces. The benefits of using fabric pots are healthy growth of plants, Prevent root rot and root circling, No need to make a hole in pots before planting a tree, and many more.




Thumb of 2021-02-03/Oxypot/103bed

Name: Larry
Burleson, Texas (Zone 8a)
fredeboy1
Feb 9, 2021 6:24 PM CST
Well I am all over the map!
#3 The Individualist I make all my planters so I put my own spin on them

Thumb of 2021-02-10/fredeboy1/d01b90
#4 The Modernist I like to really dress some up with different flowers to make them stand out



Thumb of 2021-02-10/fredeboy1/4bb8f4





Thumb of 2021-02-10/fredeboy1/9e9711
#5 The Cook Love to go straight from garden to the table

Thumb of 2021-02-10/fredeboy1/34f913



#6 The Specialist Found fabric pots last year and am really enjoying adding them to my garden



Thumb of 2021-02-10/fredeboy1/f4c5c3

Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Aroids Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower
Bulbs Annuals Butterflies Cut Flowers Farmer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Image
KFredenburg
Feb 9, 2021 7:32 PM CST
The fabric pots are neat! Lots of gardeners have been using planting bags and fabric pots for container gardening lately, so I'll have to try them out. I'm traditional, so I've kind of stayed away from them, but I'm always up to try new things.
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Name: Larry
Burleson, Texas (Zone 8a)
fredeboy1
Feb 11, 2021 12:05 AM CST
They worked really well for me the last 2 years. They are fairly cheap and easy to set up but offered really good production on peppers, tomatoes, and squash. Going to try some new herb options this season also
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Image
NMoasis
Feb 11, 2021 11:04 AM CST
I have resisted trying them for aesthetic reasons—I prefer the look of decorative ceramic pots—but recently they've appeared in bright colors, so I might reconsider this year. Gardener's Supply has some possibilities

https://www.gardeners.com/buy/...
For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.
Austin, TX
Central Texas, zone 8b.
Region: Texas Tender Perennials Fruit Growers Frugal Gardener Container Gardener
Dewberry
Feb 21, 2021 4:43 PM CST
Cottage gardener sounds most appealing to me!

That's funny, because I've been trying to create a sort of Mediterranean look, and I think of Mediterranean as a separate garden style from cottage.

Hooray for Mediterranean cottage gardens!
Name: Zoë
Albuquerque NM, Elev 5310 ft (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Herbs Salvias Composter Bee Lover Container Gardener
Bookworm Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Image
NMoasis
Feb 21, 2021 6:25 PM CST
Dewberry, I agree! Wrong climate here for the traditional lush herbaceous cottage garden. Salvia, yarrow and lavender in pots, yay Hurray!
For me, gardening is really just an excuse for playing in the dirt. Admittedly, plants are a satisfying by-product.

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