Ask a Question forum→Any recommendations for "polite" nasturtium--good in beds, non-sprawling foliage

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Name: Jessica
Portland, OR (Zone 8b)
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anoukaimee
Jan 12, 2021 10:42 PM CST
Last year, I planted two types: Peach Melba and Vesuvius; they were represented as being "petite, bedding" types rather than trailing, with a max height of 10-12".

Both came up and were quite pretty, except that they were really sprawling and by the summer, just out of control. They definitely could've been trellised up to 3'.

Wondering if there is any variety (preferably a pastel shade, but open to any) that has foliage that is a little better behaved, or if I should just look to other plants that I can grow from seed in my small, part-shade garden (schizanthus, pansies, browallia, edging lobelia, nemophila, sweet alyssum--possibly try impatiens from seed)?

Thanks from a novice to seed starting (this is my first year indoors, so I have more options).
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 13, 2021 5:36 PM CST
They all trail to some extent, even the "bush" Nasturtiums. But the more shade, the longer they will grow. I would just give my garden over to Nasturtiums - I like them that much. Smiling
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Name: Jessica
Portland, OR (Zone 8b)
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anoukaimee
Jan 13, 2021 7:50 PM CST
DaisyI said:They all trail to some extent, even the "bush" Nasturtiums. But the more shade, the longer they will grow. I would just give my garden over to Nasturtiums - I like them that much. Smiling


aha! Smiling thank you. I liked them too, except for the aphid blight that set in late summer--and they kind of took over everything else, so there was that...

I'm actually thinking about trying the tropaeolum peregrinum (sp?), canary vine, that apparently does as well as thunbergia alata in part shade. See how that does for my ugly fences.

Last year I started really late, and didn't have many choices: it was all direct sow. Planted a bunch of stuff in partial shade, and the nasturtium did well but they were "leggy" to say the least. The balsam really flourished (though it's a weird looking plant! wow--and I really think getting a head start in a peat pot would've been best), as did, surprisingly, the four o'clocks. And I think someone sold me clarkia amoena instead of unguiculata; it was just scraggly and short.

This year, looking at starting indoors and pretty psyched about it. I rent, and I'm actually moving to the family farm (YES!!!) in the fall, limited to annuals. Along with the taller clarkia, going to try some nicotiana varieties, browallia, cleome, lobelia, sweet alyssum, nemophila, torenia, and schizanthus. If I can find an impatiens that isn't too hard for a noob--I'm willing to put in the work!!--might try that.

Thanks for your help. I'm a long-term lurker, but you guys are great.

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