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Name: Elizabeth
Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a)
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pawsplus
Jan 19, 2021 11:33 AM CST
So having mostly sorted out the shrubs for around the door, I have another space I need help with. There was this massive stand of privet that I fought for 17 years. I would beat it back and then it would take over again. I finally hired a guy down the street with a chainsaw and he and his son and I have spent weeks (when he had the time) taking it ALL OUT. It was about 3 million trailer-loads of brush and I am exhausted. The stump grinder guy is out there now.

So it's gone--yay. BUT now there is a long empty place. It's a clear run of about 100 feet along the road. I want to plant some small trees just inside the fence. It's under the power line so need stuff that stays pretty small. I have 2 dogwoods on the other side--could do that again. Or apple trees? Do you need boy and girl apple trees to get fruit?? What are good small varieties that make nice apples and aren't TOO much work? Or other ideas?

I am pretty flexible, but would prefer native trees or trees that SEEM native. Nothing fancy. Just need to stay 10 feet or less to be safe. I suspect that the electric co is going to be so delighted to see the privet gone that they won't worry overmuch about small trees under the lines as long as they are officially in my front yard and it's a "groomed" area, as they put it.

Oh and it gets decent AM sun but due to the hills around me, not full day sun. I am in Zone 6-7 (on the cusp in Middle TN). I can't remember the last time it got down into negative temps.

Pic is of one of the azaleas we pulled out, but you can see the area in question in the background.
Thumb of 2021-01-19/pawsplus/9626fe

Thanks!


[Last edited by pawsplus - Jan 19, 2021 12:15 PM (+)]
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Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
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KFredenburg
Jan 19, 2021 12:02 PM CST
Hello again!

What's your zone? Forgive me if you said what it was in the previous post...

Depending on your zone, plums and pears would be a good choice. If you live in a warmer climate, then you could do citrus (such as oranges, lemons, etc.). If you would like pretty trees, you can plant oleanders (which are shrubs, but you can basically turn them into trees by cutting the bottom branches off, and you can watch a YouTube video on it). Oleanders have beautiful flowers, and can get up to ten feet tall. Oleanders are also xeriscapic (dry climate plants), so if you live in an area that gets lots of rain or water in general, oleanders won't thrive.

Whatever you choose, I wish you the best of luck with it!
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
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Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
[Last edited by KFredenburg - Jan 19, 2021 12:02 PM (+)]
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Name: Elizabeth
Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a)
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pawsplus
Jan 19, 2021 12:13 PM CST
Sorry--I am just S. of Nashville. Zone 7 I think?
Name: Elizabeth
Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a)
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pawsplus
Jan 19, 2021 12:14 PM CST
So what's wrong with apple trees? :-)
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
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KFredenburg
Jan 19, 2021 12:31 PM CST
Yes, you are in zone 7a.

I don't believe you need both male and female plants to produce fruit. Apple trees would be a good option. What type of apple trees are hoping to plant (e.g. honeycrisp, gala, etc.)? Whether or not you need two trees of opposite genders differ with different species.

From everything I know though, you don't really need a male tree and female tree to produce fruit when it comes to apples.
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Name: Elizabeth
Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a)
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pawsplus
Jan 19, 2021 12:44 PM CST
Looks like you need 2 apple trees of different species for good pollination. Don't understand that really, but it's what the internet says. But apples seem to require full sun?
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
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KFredenburg
Jan 19, 2021 12:56 PM CST
Ah yes, that is something I didn't mention. Apples do require full sun. But how many hours of sun do you get (on average) per day? Anything around 6-8 hours should still be fine.
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
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Name: Maryl
Oklahoma (Zone 7a)
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Maryl
Jan 19, 2021 1:54 PM CST
Golden Delicious are one of the best all around apples for eating and baking in zone 7. I grew one for years. Notice I said one. It doesn't need two for pollination. It had an abundance of apples. Actually an over abundance. Every day I was out there cleaning up fallen apples. The fault was not with the apple tree but where I put it. In the middle of my small manicured back yard. It also drew all sorts of unwelcome critters feeding on the excess apples that I might fail to pick up. So after thousands of pies, breads, tarts, and dumplings I had it removed. Lesson learned......Also how big it grows can be controlled somewhat by the root stock it is grown on. I bought mine from Stark Bros. mail order and it was on dwarf root stock. The size of the tree was never an issue, just the amount of fruit. In the right setting, it would have been fine.........Maryl
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Jan 19, 2021 2:11 PM CST
Oleanders are seriously poisonous. I believe you said you had horses - so not a good choice. Apples can be had in dwarf varieties which might stay out of the power lines.
Porkpal
Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
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KFredenburg
Jan 19, 2021 3:08 PM CST
Bea (bumplbea) had oleanders which her farm animals ate. It is not poisonous to farm animals. She had horses, cows, and goats eating the oleanders, and nothing happened. Oleanders are only poisonous to humans, and a select few of animals (it can make dogs sick, but not kill them).

Think of raw meat. Raw meat would make us very sick, and might even kill us depending how much we ate, but to predators such as lions and tigers, it's a delicacy.
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Jan 19, 2021 3:41 PM CST
Crabapples and Redbuds are nice ornamental trees that would do well in your area
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 19, 2021 5:06 PM CST
KFredenburg said:Bea (bumplbea) had oleanders which her farm animals ate. It is not poisonous to farm animals. She had horses, cows, and goats eating the oleanders, and nothing happened. Oleanders are only poisonous to humans, and a select few of animals (it can make dogs sick, but not kill them).


Oleanders are highly toxic to livestock but most animals will eat around it unless they are really hungry.

https://alfalfa.ucdavis.edu/-f...

KFredenburg said:
Think of raw meat. Raw meat would make us very sick, and might even kill us depending how much we ate, but to predators such as lions and tigers, it's a delicacy.


Raw meat won't hurt you unless its spoiled or has live parasites. I bet you don't eat sashimi either. Smiling
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Name: Kim
Black Hills, SD (Zone 5a)
Discover more wildflowers
Aroids Snakes Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tomato Heads Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower
Bulbs Annuals Butterflies Cut Flowers Farmer Native Plants and Wildflowers
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KFredenburg
Jan 19, 2021 5:20 PM CST
True Daisy!

But Bea said it never harmed her livestock. She said that when she saw the horses mowing down the oleander bushes, she was very frightened, but nothing ever happened.

Maybe it doesn't harm specific breeds??
Love is patient and love is kind. Always be loving and kind to one another.
(Abridged from 1Cor. 13:4)
Let’s talk about Animal Fun Facts, Birds, Trees/Shrubs, or Oleanders!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jan 19, 2021 5:44 PM CST
There are lots and lots of articles explaining how toxic Oleander is to horses (and other animals). So either Bea's horses didn't actually eat it, just around it or, didn't eat enough to kill them or, Bea doesn't know what an Oleander looks like. Smiling

In my experience, its so bitter most animals avoid it but, if they are really hungry, they will eat it. Oleander doesn't kill snails though.

I don't think the breed matters but, if its a percentage of weight (as stated in one study), it would take more to kill a large horse.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
[Last edited by DaisyI - Jan 19, 2021 5:47 PM (+)]
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Name: Amanda
KC metro area, Missouri (Zone 6a)
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pepper23
Jan 19, 2021 5:46 PM CST
Chionanthus virginicus- white fringe tree. Great tree, I have two and love em.

Amelanchier sp- serviceberry is another one I like.

Here's a list from the University of Tennessee extension. https://extension.tennessee.ed...

Name: Elizabeth
Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a)
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pawsplus
Jan 19, 2021 6:45 PM CST
I hadn't thought of critters . . . I want to feed the birds, etc., but in the past I had a rat problem, and given that I ended up live-trapping them all and re-homing them in an undisclosed, very out-of-the-way place, I don't want to have to repeat that. Fallen fruit would be a real draw there.

I would like something pretty, small, and native to the area or at least something that would look like it fit in out here in the boonies. Serviceberry sounds nice--but would they get too tall? Are there dwarf varieties?

I love dogwood, but the 2 I have, which were planted by the electric co when they took out 2 of my trees a few years ago, are weird. I think the guys planted them too close together. They don't flower normally and one of them has strange branches. I tried to correct that, but I didn't really succeed and now it's too late.

Ugh. I don't kno!
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Jan 19, 2021 7:23 PM CST
Pear trees? Hawthorn? Viburnum? Some might have to be trimmed to stay short.
Porkpal
Name: Maryl
Oklahoma (Zone 7a)
Cat Lover Daylilies Roses Container Gardener Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Cactus and Succulents
Region: Oklahoma Enjoys or suffers hot summers
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Maryl
Jan 20, 2021 1:33 AM CST
RJ mentioned one of my favorite small trees. Crab Apples. There are ornamental ones, with little to no fruit drop, there are fruiting ones that can be used for making Crab Apple Jelly. On a side note. I LOVE a good batch of Crab Apple jelly. Just enough tart in it to set it apart from some of the sweeter jams and jellies. Unfortunately I can't find any for sale for love nor money......... There are lots of varieties of Crab Apples to choose from, and most stay a reasonably small size. The drawback with the older varieties is disease. I grew an older variety of an ornamental Crab Apple for over 20 years and it was very susceptible to scab which marred the leaves pretty badly in rainy years. Since then they have hybridized a multitude of scab resistant Crab Apples, along with resistance to the other diseases that can plague them (Cedar Apple Rust, Fire Blight etc - diseases I never encountered). After consultation with an arborist about scab , he advised that when in doubt choose a white flowered variety.....I'm still mulling over where I can put another one. I really love them..........Maryl.
Name: Elizabeth
Middle Tennessee (Zone 7a)
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pawsplus
Jan 20, 2021 8:28 AM CST
I will ask about crabapple when I am at the nursery this afternoon but their price list only lists one and it's not a dwarf. They have a number of dwarf apples. I could just be really good about picking up the fruit . . . and I could take damaged fruit and toss it up in the woods for the critters. Smiling Will see about maybe choosing 2 separate species of dwarf apple? I will have to learn how to prune. I messed up the dogwoods and don't want to do that again.
Name: SkirtGardener
Central Pennsylvania (Zone 5a)
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SkirtGardener
Jan 20, 2021 11:15 AM CST
With decent AM sun, I'm starting to think that Japanese Maples would do good there. Perhaps some dwarf size dogwoods, magnolias, or rhododendrons... I don't know if Apples would be happy with the less than full day light, but you could look for Genetic Dwarf types that will only grow to 10' high. Garden Delicious and Apple Babe are two of these cultivars I'm planning on getting familiar with this year, that scored high in taste tests as well. Apples don't come in male and female, so much as they simply aren't self-fruitful... so need another cultivar in the area blooming at the same time, to set fruit by. Crabapples will pollinate apples, too, as they are just cultivars bred for aesthetic appeal rather than apple size, quality, and taste. With the exception of a few weeping or sargentii cultivars, I don't know which of those would qualify as dwarf.

I think looking online for specific cultivars this time of year is likely to be your best bet, as local places may not have a wide selection.
Learning to work with Mother Nature rather than against her, such that the more I harvest with thankfulness, the more she will most gladly and willingly provide.
Specializing in a wide variety of trees and shrubs, occasionally with perennials as an incidental bonus.

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