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freeport ns canada
poornoob
Feb 6, 2021 10:38 AM CST
hello all!
new home owner and green gardener but not in the good way. my wife and i just bought a tiny house on long island nova scotia by the sea. we have a very wet yard front and back when it rains so much so that we have a small pond in the front about 30% of the time :). we have a great view but no curb appeal. I think we have to raise the level as much as we can (not much considering the house isnt much higher than the front) and slope it down put in french drains? disguise them as dry creek beds? make the pond a permanent feature perhaps a wet garden? i have no idea and price is definaitely a small barrier at this point any ideas? had a wee video but i dont think it loaded
thanks for any and all help
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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Feb 6, 2021 11:07 AM CST
An ephemeral wet spot like this provides habitat for all kinds of birds, insects, amphibians, and small mammals - and can be an attractive little oasis just outside your door and along your driveway. I'd start planting it with wetland/wet spot species, rather than filling it in or draining it.

There are likely many of these plants already growing in your area. Though I am not a Nova Scotia specialist, my wife and I did visit this wonderful part of the world in October 1988 and circumnavigated the province prior to departing by ferry from Yarmouth. We have exceptionally fond memories of a seafood lunch in Digby...

I recall that there are more than a few ericaceous (acid soils preference) species commonly found - blueberry and cranberry species, hollies, and probably others I don't recognize. There will also be all kinds of herbaceous "wet feet" plants too. I'd only warn to be careful with the Horsetail clan; they tend to colonize everywhere unstoppably.

Winterberry Holly and Inkberry Holly are two shrubs to start with. They tolerate wetter ground, sandy acid soils, and waterfront properties. If any shrubby dogwoods are hardy there, include them. Then sedges, rushes, and waterside grasses will add more seasonal interest. There are likely a variety of flowering perennial species, too. Then, just mow around the edges - or expand the plantings in the "uplands" surrounding the pond with plants that don't need regular inundation. I'd recommend visiting public gardens or other natural areas for some inspiration and ideas of what grows well.

Here are a few references:

https://www.inaturalist.org/ch...

http://nswildflora.ca/links/na...

http://novascotianature.com/aq...

John
freeport ns canada
poornoob
Feb 6, 2021 11:25 AM CST
oh indeed I feel it is better to work with nature and emphasize it even, we do need to drain away from the house i feel as we have had water in the crawl space. I know the importance of bogs wetlands and what have you but not interested in walking through one Smiling Im glad you came up for a visit but you should have come farther than digby im the chef on brier island at the lodge Smiling so what id like to do is slightly raise the ground level perhaps some shallow tiers going down and as far as the drainage goes if i can direct where the water will end up I might be able to create a wet garden not sure about how i would make the temp pond permanent but it's a thought. trees and such ill have to make sure the can tolerate the wind and a wind break would be nice near the house
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Feb 6, 2021 12:49 PM CST
I can certainly agree that you don't want water collecting around or under your house! That would be called a boat...

Your pictures show views away from your house, and the ponding down next to what I assume is your driveway. That's not the problem you are describing, and that's where I recommended the "wet spot" garden plantings.

If you can show more of the conditions on each side of your house, then better recommendations can be made. I don't know which side you are calling front yard or back yard, nor which direction (north, south, east, west) is which.

Normally, if water is collecting and flowing against or under a house, then raising the soil around the house is exactly backwards of what needs to be done - because that will often prevent water from getting back out. A better approach is to know what the soil elevations are all the way around the house, and then create a swale ( a low broad mowable ditch) around your house into which water will flow from the upper side to the lower side, and then away to that roadside ditch, or an intermediate rain garden, or maybe into your existing driveway pond. Additionally, any roof runoff from gutters and downspouts or directly off the roof needs to be steered to such swales as well, since that roof runoff collects far more quickly than water flowing overland through a flatter lawn.

I'm including a chicken-scratch drawing, indicating how to manage overland flow of rain water on a relatively flat property. Downspouts or rain runoff from roof should be guided into the swale and away from the house/structure.

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John
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 6, 2021 5:00 PM CST
poornoob said:hello all!
new home owner and green gardener but not in the good way. my wife and i just bought a tiny house on long island nova scotia by the sea. we have a very wet yard front and back when it rains so much so that we have a small pond in the front about 30% of the time :). we have a great view but no curb appeal. I think we have to raise the level as much as we can (not much considering the house isnt much higher than the front) and slope it down put in french drains? disguise them as dry creek beds? make the pond a permanent feature perhaps a wet garden? i have no idea and price is definaitely a small barrier at this point any ideas? had a wee video but i dont think it loaded
thanks for any and all help.


Yes, to all of the above. Keep the pond and work with the gentle slope of your land to encourage water to flow away from your house. You can drain the water away from your house with raingutters feeding into French drains or creeks where it fits into your landscape plan. Plant thirsty trees (willows or river birch) and plants that appreciate a lot of mosture. Instead of trying to change things, use the terrain to your advange.

Watch for the rest of the winter and think about what you would like your yard to look like. Plan from the street side as you are trying to add curb appeal.



Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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