Texas Gardening forum→After the freeze: what are you doing?

Page 4 of 4 • 1 2 3 4
Views: 1996, Replies: 73 » Jump to the end
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Jun 26, 2021 3:43 PM CST
I see no harm in waiting. Good luck .
Porkpal
Name: Peggy
Temple, TX (Zone 8b)
Region: Texas Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Deer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bluebonnets Irises Lilies
Image
Peggy8b
Jul 8, 2021 3:29 PM CST
Another recovery story. I have had 5 Encore 'Autumn Embers' in a little wedge of soil alongside my rear driveway for I guess 4 years now. Here's one of them 2 years ago:
Thumb of 2021-07-08/Peggy8b/62627f
Well, all 5 froze off to the ground in the February freeze. Branches were brittle, brown sticks for the most part. But I waited, and waited for 2 months and finally, a few shoots started pushing through at the ground level of the main trunk and a few side branches down low. I trimmed off the clearly dead material on each branch and just kept watering and fertilizing them with acid-loving food once a month (I'm in alkaline territory in Temple). Here they are now, with some Cast Iron Plant bed companions invading from my neighbor's yard:
Thumb of 2021-07-08/Peggy8b/89cdf2
Thumb of 2021-07-08/Peggy8b/84a877
These are in dappled shade all day long until about 4-5pm when they get full sun.

My low-carb recipe website: www.buttoni.wordpress.com
[Last edited by Peggy8b - Jul 9, 2021 8:16 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2548061 (2)
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
Jul 8, 2021 3:57 PM CST
Looks and behaved like my Encore Amethyst.

You may want to add a metal barrier to block the stuff from your neighbor's yard.
Name: Peggy
Temple, TX (Zone 8b)
Region: Texas Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Deer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bluebonnets Irises Lilies
Image
Peggy8b
Jul 9, 2021 8:22 AM CST
I hadn't thought about trying to block the aspidistras with metal. Our soil is so hard, wrought with limestone bits and clay, it won't be easy to place, that's for sure. That's the price for being on the highest point of the Edward Plateau limestone ridge running the length of the state: alkaline soil and rock-hard soil. A shovel forced straight down might get a narrow trench deep enough right by the fence to be effective at getting it in there. Thanks for a good idea.
My low-carb recipe website: www.buttoni.wordpress.com
Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
Jul 9, 2021 8:40 AM CST
I hear you. It happens with caliche soil. You may want to try forcing the metal barrier down with a plastic tip hammer after it has rained or after you have watered the soil deeply.
Name: Linda Williams
Medina Co., TX (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Enjoys or suffers hot summers Organic Gardener Salvias Herbs Bluebonnets
Native Plants and Wildflowers Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Forum moderator Purslane Hummingbirder Cat Lover
Image
LindaTX8
Jul 10, 2021 11:27 PM CST
Some of those limestone rocks are a foot or more long. I should know. I've dug some of them up when making garden beds.
I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. E. B.White
Integrity can never be taken. It can only be given, and I wasn't going to give it up to these people. Gary Mowad
Name: Peggy
Temple, TX (Zone 8b)
Region: Texas Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Deer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bluebonnets Irises Lilies
Image
Peggy8b
Jul 26, 2021 3:06 PM CST
I dug up some that big when planting things in my last yard across town. But this yard has blessed me with much smaller ones, none over 6". But they are everpresent with every hole I dig. I've got 6 new giant liriopes on their way to me and will have to dig some holes out front by week's end. I'm dreading it already.
My low-carb recipe website: www.buttoni.wordpress.com
[Last edited by Peggy8b - Jul 27, 2021 1:31 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2561554 (7)
Name: Betsy
Texas (Zone 9a)
In the beginning GOD created ...
Region: Texas Master Gardener: Texas Irises Composter Butterflies Bookworm
Bluebonnets Daylilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Amaryllis Cottage Gardener Clematis
Image
piksihk
Aug 12, 2021 11:58 AM CST
Both the rangoon creepers came back and are blooming profusely. Hurray!
Couple of the hibiscus did finally show life but no blooms; but a friend's mother's (over 50 years old hibiscus which I rooted) did not survive...my friend also lost the mother plant Crying It was a gorgeous hibiscus.

After cutting back the Little John bottlebushes, they are sending oup stems.
The angel trumpet also pruned down is now as tall as the fence. Pride of B. is blooming nicely.

The ROS didn't make it, but there are many seedlings of it. The Conferate Rose is in full bloom with many pollinators enjoying them.

Two huge Viburnum trees are yet to be cut down; there are stuckers sprouting from the base.

The bulbs survived - amaryllis (few rotted), rain lilies, agapanthus, crocosmia and glads. Irises, gloriosa lilies, daylilies and gingers are fine. Knock-out roses doing ok.

It's already August! where did the time go? I guess my now, we know what has survived; so sad to hear that many of you lost so many plants.







“For even the Son of Man/Jesus did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.””
‭‭Mark‬ ‭10:45‬ ‭
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Aug 17, 2021 1:27 PM CST
I was just about to dump this after the February freeze appeared to have killed it. But when I started, I noticed little green spots low and realized it was trying to bud out. It did and grew a lot of canes. The wind ripped a few of the longer ones off early, but most stayed attached. Usually by now, the Bougainvillea would be on its 3rd or 4th cycle of bloom. This year all that has shown up has been 4-5 blooms on two canes. It's mostly not quite blooming yet, but it's tuning up.
Thumb of 2021-08-17/needrain/f79ccb

Donald
Name: fabkebab
Houston, Texas (Zone 9a)
Image
fabkebab
Aug 18, 2021 4:23 PM CST
I hardly lost anything in the end - except for one huge citrus tree that produced the most sour oranges imaginable


Notable survivors (all in the ground. all froze back to roots) -

angel wing jasmine
lakeview Jasmine
Dwarf Calliandra
Palm grass (Setaria palmifolia)
Firespike (Odontonema cuspidatum)
Peacock Ginger (Kaempheria)
Banana Shrub (Michela Figo) - leaves fell off, but regrew
Name: Peggy
Temple, TX (Zone 8b)
Region: Texas Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Deer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bluebonnets Irises Lilies
Image
Peggy8b
Sep 6, 2021 2:51 PM CST
I thought I had lost a dark red bougainvillia down at our cabin property in Gause. All canes appeared dead after the freeze. But I noticed a shoot coming out off the roots in June and thought there was some hope it would come back. Last trip down there in late August showed 4-5 nice canes (but no blooms), so I think it might come around nicely by next spring. I'm hoping, at least.

My relatively young Desert Willow down at the cabin survived the awful freeze this year, but continues to struggle to get established. They have tap roots, which helps, but our water is fairly rare there. But they survive in desert terrain, so why not Central Texas? It's in its 4th season now and just not looking like a 4 y.o. tree ought to be looking IMHO. Think I'll hammer some fertilizer stakes in the ground next trip down there and also put a trickle hose on it for a whole dday. Deep watering monthly and fertilizing once a season has not done the trick. It puts out a nice display of new, healthy green leaves every Spring, but doesn't make any new branches or grow mujch taller (and they are supposed to be pretty fast growers). Rarely sets any blooms anymore, either.

The young pecan tree some 20' away from it does well on our sparse rainfall, so a tap root (which Desert Willow have) will seek out deep underground water. Our sandy soil drains well, too, which these trees like. As yet, I have not thought the tree diseased, but if a trickle hose and fertilizer stakes in the ground don't improve it this Spring, I'm going to suspect it is in fact diseased with some sort of fungal or viral disease.
My low-carb recipe website: www.buttoni.wordpress.com
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Sep 6, 2021 3:17 PM CST
My Bougainvillea which was just about to be dumped because it appeared dead has put out a lot of new canes. 4-5 have been ripped off by the wind so I'm not sure how strongly attached the sucker growth is, but there were a lot and it's been in full, glorious bloom for about three weeks now.
Thumb of 2021-09-06/needrain/8427a2

Donald
Name: Peggy
Temple, TX (Zone 8b)
Region: Texas Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Deer Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bluebonnets Irises Lilies
Image
Peggy8b
Sep 6, 2021 3:21 PM CST
Wow! It DOES look happy, Donald.
My low-carb recipe website: www.buttoni.wordpress.com
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Sep 6, 2021 3:26 PM CST
Peggy8b said:Wow! It DOES look happy, Donald.


It's the first bloom this year. Ordinarily it would have gone through four cycles or more by this time.
Donald

Page 4 of 4 • 1 2 3 4

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Texas Gardening forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by lauriemorningglory and is called "Heart of the Sunflower"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.