Plant ID forum→What are these trees?

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Name: Evan
Portland, OR
Eschaye
Apr 10, 2021 3:27 PM CST
My wife and I just bought a new house and there are two big trees in the yard that are a complete mystery to me.

The first one is flowering right now; the picture I have is just before bloom. The local nursery's best guess was some kind of apple. I'd like to figure out what it is so I can pollinate and get it to fruit. Can grab more pictures of the flowers if that would help.

The second one (droopy) I have no guesses. Any help is much appreciated!

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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Apr 10, 2021 6:18 PM CST
Yes, open flower photos would be helpful. Apples leaf out before they bloom.

No idea on the second. Maybe post more photos after it leafs out or blooms.

Why do you think your tree will need help getting pollinated?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
Apr 10, 2021 7:39 PM CST
I think the second one is a Camperdown Elm.

It the first one is an apple, then a second non-identical apple (that blooms at the same time) will provide pollen for insects to cause cross-pollination and increase the amount of fruit set. This is a common approach for clonal selections of members in Rosaceae, many of which are poorly self-fertile.
John
Name: Evan
Portland, OR
Eschaye
Apr 10, 2021 10:20 PM CST
Ah, yes, it is definitely a Camperdown Elm - thank you.

My friend just pointed out to me that if the first one is in fact an apple, I can probably use a crabapple to cross-pollinate. I think I'll try that and see how it goes.

Thanks for the help!
[Last edited by Eschaye - Apr 10, 2021 10:21 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Apr 11, 2021 12:19 AM CST
Sighing! Apple trees leaf out before they bloom.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Apr 11, 2021 7:17 AM CST
Hi Eschaye:

You could take some additional pictures of the first tree. I suspect it may be a member of Prunus sp., due to a couple factors.

One, as DaisyI notes, is that Malus sp. (Apples, Crabapples) typically push leaves first - against which then the blooms open. Prunus sp. flowers often precede the leaves, especially the earliest spring bloomers.

Second, there are striking features on the trunk of your first tree, which you could illustrate more clearly with additional photos. The single main trunk shows a "shaggier" bark, which differs significantly from the stems/branches which arise from it - which are smoother and appear more cherry-like, with the horizontal rows of lenticels.

I suspect that this is a top-grafted specimen, where the main trunk is a different species of Prunus upon which the specific clone was grafted at a certain height above the ground. This is quite common practice, and it creates this pronounced appearance as the grafted plant ages.

Show us more of this interesting case.
John

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