Roses forum→Rose Cuttings

Views: 205, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
Assam, India
PranabSingh
May 8, 2021 1:02 AM CST
Hi folks, I have tried a rose cutting to be grown in my tub filled with garden soil 50% and sand 50%.
I dipped the rose flower cuttings in the tub & covered with a bottle to maintain moisture. After 2/4 weeks some leaves have grown (it's a success). So i removed the bottle which I covered the rose cutting. The next day i saw the leaves was dried off n my cutting failed.
Please need help on this.
1. Did i removed the covered bottle very early.
2. When should i remove the bottle covered?

Thanks

Name: Luis
Hurst, TX, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
Dog Lover Region: Texas Salvias Roses Hibiscus Plumerias
luis_pr
May 8, 2021 3:11 AM CST
Maybe, I think I waited 6-8 weeks for roots to form and then removed the bottle but this was done in the Fall, not in the Spring.
MICHIGAN
desireesherman2017
May 8, 2021 9:15 AM CST
Hi there,
I recently took some cuttings from my miniature indoor rose bushes and experienced a similar issue. I had a few come out successfully but one day I was checking for roots (not a good idea to do) and seen a couple of sprouts so I removed the cups I had over them and the next day they were gone completely! I should have waited longer, because the others survived, that remained covered and now they are finally strong enough to be uncovered. I was not too upset because I am experimenting right now to find what works best for me, my climate and schedule through all the different tips I have read/heard/watched. I kind of expected it but need to try to illuminate it from my routine. My advice, even when you think they are ready or feel it is time, wait a couple more days. It will only help support the rose and continue its happy life cycle. Hope this helps!

All the best! 🌹
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
May 8, 2021 2:10 PM CST
If they are covered with the pot bottle, just remove the cap. Or raise the bottle up a bit to give some extra ventilation and slowly remove it. Then just keep it off for a small. Of time. Also spray those baby leaves when you take it off.
Name: Beth
Northern California (Zone 9b)
Roses Enjoys or suffers hot summers Container Gardener Clematis Garden Photography Birds
Irises Keeper of Poultry Region: California Hummingbirder Cat Lover Lilies
Image
Beth_NorCal
May 8, 2021 4:36 PM CST
I get way too anxious and tend to check on my cuttings before I should. I have found that you need to leave them covered for a minimum of 4 wks. After that, you can check them any time, but always make sure to mist the stems and remove any dead or moldy leaves. If any stems look black at the base, remove them too. Be sure to tamp the soil around the stems so they are secure. By 8 wks, you should be able to tell if they've rooted or not. They should be tight in the soil. If they're wiggly, they aren't rooted, or only partially rooted. Tamp the soil around the stems again if they are loose. Once you are sure they've rooted, uncover them and continue to mist them a couple times a day. They have to get hardened off. That takes a few days. I lost a lot of them opening them up too early and not keeping them misted. If they're well rooted they will do just fine.

And just a tip... John Bagnasco from Garden America radio show told me to use Hormex #8 rooting hormone mixed 50/50 with cinnamon. The cinnamon apparently helps to stop rot. Not completely, but it has really helped. I'm now able to root florist roses, which have been extremely difficult to root before.

It's so much fun and so rewarding when you loosen the soil and see all those nice little roots! Good luck!
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
May 8, 2021 5:28 PM CST
Thank you for that tip Beth! JB bred 1 of my favorite roses in my garden, Tooth Fairy! What a thrill to have met him, although it was probably pretty thrilling to meet you too. 😊
Name: Margie
NY (Zone 7a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner 2020
MargieNY
May 8, 2021 8:05 PM CST
I have found cinnamon to be effective as a fungicide. When potting up my dahlias I sprinkle it around the top layer of soil.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.c...
Observe, observe, observe
We are fortunate to "see" & appreciate nature in ways others are blind.
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
Image
vaporvac
May 8, 2021 8:26 PM CST
Margie, I wonder if that spray they mention would help for blackspot as a fungicide.
Name: Margie
NY (Zone 7a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Photo Contest Winner 2020
MargieNY
May 8, 2021 9:53 PM CST
vaporvac said:Margie, I wonder if that spray they mention would help for blackspot as a fungicide.

Perhaps, but it sounds like a lot of prep work.
I have been using Actinovate SP and OxiDate. I begin my schedule by applying Actinovate in early spring. Than every 2 weeks I apply the OxiDate. I make sure I spray the leaves, the canes and the soil under the canopy of each rose. I also spray any nearby perennials and shrubs. Note: the very first time I used Actinovate I drudged the soil under each rose bush - 1 gallon of water mixed with 1 teaspoon of Actinovate. When I receive a new bareroot roses I soak them in a pail of water with Actinovate - prevention is key. Finally, in the Fall/winter when the roses are going or have gone dormant I prune the roses. I can not see the point of overwintering any possible fungus on the canes. In general, I prune by 1/3. At this time, I apply the Actinovate again for a second time and last time for the year. All the roses, are winterized by mounding with a few shovelfuls of topsoil mixed with a small amount of perlite and mulch. The idea behind adding the small amount of mulch & perlite to the topsoil is to create some air circulation. Lastly, I top off the topsoil mixture with mulch. Some of the hybrid teas are sensitive to the very cold weather - those are wrapped in burlap. I form a teepee using 3 garden stakes secured at the top, wrap the burlap around and staple the selvage ends. This cone shape prevents snow or rain from accumulating at the very top.

Observe, observe, observe
We are fortunate to "see" & appreciate nature in ways others are blind.
[Last edited by MargieNY - May 8, 2021 10:24 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2498473 (9)

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Roses forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "Redbud 'Forest Pansy' bloom"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.