Plant ID forum→Metasequoia?

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Name: Mone
Chicago *O'Hare/Lake* (Zone 6a)
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pitimpinai
Jun 16, 2021 4:24 PM CST
A street tree in Chicago:
Thumb of 2021-06-16/pitimpinai/333322
Thumb of 2021-06-16/pitimpinai/82980f
Thumb of 2021-06-16/pitimpinai/7174dc
Thumb of 2021-06-16/pitimpinai/5ad9ba

Thanks.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 16, 2021 4:36 PM CST
The easiest way to tell the difference is Dawn Redwoods (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) have opposite needles while Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) have alternate needles.

Edited to add: This is a Dawn Redwood:
Thumb of 2021-06-16/DaisyI/ab221b

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[Last edited by DaisyI - Jun 16, 2021 4:38 PM (+)]
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San Francisco Bay area (Zone 9a)
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Iochroma
Jun 16, 2021 5:49 PM CST
I I would venture that it must be Metasequoia because it is the only one that will survive Chicago winters.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 16, 2021 5:54 PM CST
That is one crazy looking tree!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
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Name: Mone
Chicago *O'Hare/Lake* (Zone 6a)
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pitimpinai
Jun 16, 2021 7:56 PM CST
Thank you, Darsyl & lochroma.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 16, 2021 8:14 PM CST
I don't think you have an ID. I can't see the opposite needles of a Dawn Redwood. The tree is very scattered and chaotic for Dawn Redwood and Bald Cypress. It could be something completely different.

Dawn Redwoods and Bald Cypress look very much alike and the tree in your photos doesn't look like either one. Did you see cones or flowers? Do you know if its deciduous?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Mone
Chicago *O'Hare/Lake* (Zone 6a)
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pitimpinai
Jun 17, 2021 4:21 AM CST
A Bald Cypress would not survive Chicago winters.
I just saw the tree for the first time a couple days ago.
The tree is deciduous according to my friend.

The needles do not look like those of Bald Cypress as shown in this article:
https://www.illinoiswildflower...
[Last edited by pitimpinai - Jun 17, 2021 4:25 AM (+)]
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Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Jun 17, 2021 9:02 AM CST
Bald Cypress on the University of Mn campus

https://campustrees.umn.edu/ba...
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San Francisco Bay area (Zone 9a)
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Iochroma
Jun 17, 2021 1:06 PM CST
crawgarden said:Bald Cypress on the University of Mn campus

https://campustrees.umn.edu/ba...


Amazing!
I wonder if it survived the last two polar vortex events - below -40

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 17, 2021 1:14 PM CST
I'm not sure why you don't think a Bald Cypress would live in Chicago. They are listed on the City of Chicago Urban Tree List.

https://www.chicagobotanic.org...
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
San Francisco Bay area (Zone 9a)
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Iochroma
Jun 17, 2021 2:48 PM CST
DaisyI said:I'm not sure why you don't think a Bald Cypress would live in Chicago. They are listed on the City of Chicago Urban Tree List.

https://www.chicagobotanic.org...


Sorry to doubt you; it's just that I think of this as a part of the flora of the Southern US, and if I ever saw it North of Arkansas I thought it was an anomaly that was sure to die in those one-in-10-year freezes.
Now I see some references list it as Zone 2! Must grow in Calgary!
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Silversurfer
Jun 17, 2021 3:11 PM CST
I have always found this link a great help.
Bald cypress leaves are very different compared to Dawn redwood.
Pic credit web site below.
Thumb of 2021-06-17/Silversurfer/cffa1a

https://www.google.com/search?...





[Last edited by Silversurfer - Jun 17, 2021 3:14 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jun 17, 2021 3:27 PM CST
I think the tree in pitimpinai's photo is an especially ugly Bald Cypress. In my experience (I've grown them both), the Bald Cypress is a little disorganized, needle and growth wise. The Dawn Redwood with its opposite needles and layered branches is much more identifiable. pitimpinai's only close-up photo doesn't make the alternate/opposite easy to see and the branching is chaotic (I know, very scientific Hilarious! ) making me lean towards Bald Cypress. The cones would be very distinguishable, that's why I asked.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Garden Photography Plant Identifier
Image
Silversurfer
Jun 18, 2021 1:45 AM CST
Sorry I should have said...I agree Bald cypress.
1st pic shows it quite clearly.

The leaflets are daintier, finer, longer tapered etc.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
Jun 18, 2021 10:02 PM CST
Sorry to be late to the game, and I believe all opinions have been offered and reconciled.

I will unconditionally state: Taxodium distichum is hardy into at least zone 4, because I have purchased, transported, and planted successfully 10" caliper Taxodium distichum 'Shawnee Brave' from a southern Wisconsin nursery to the thoroughbred horse farm in central Kentucky for which I used to manage the landscape. Four of these trees still grace the easternmost broodmare barn on that farm; they were planted in spring 1992.

The tree illustrated is unquestionably Taxodium distichum, for all the reasons mentioned. The leaf arrangement is in no way opposite, so it cannot be the similar Metasequoia glyptostroboides. I suspect Bald-cypress does well in metro Chicago due to the city's heat island effect, and its tolerant of saturated soils as well as its tolerance of droughty conditions and a wide range of soil types.

Taxodium distichum is native in Reelfoot Lake, which straddles the KY-TN state line. It also forms phenomenal specimens in southern Illinois swamps. Giant City State Park is near some of those exceptional stands, where it forms a swamp-wetland association with Nyssa aquatica. The Great Rivers Chapter of Holly Society of America has made regular visits to this interesting environment over the years that I've been a member.

Finally, this species ranges as far north as Maryland at Battle Creek Cypress Swamp. I had the pleasure of walking this property back in July 1991. I don't recommend visiting that time of year.

This species likely covered most of what is the temperate North American continent prior to the last glacial Ice Age, which eliminated everything in the path of mile-thick sheets of ice. As that insult retreated (which is still occurring), plants have moved northerly to reclaim the ground they once occupied. Thus, species like Taxodium distichum, Aesculus parviflora, Hydrangea quercifolia, and many more can be found happily growing in landscapes far north/colder than where European settlers and plantsmen found them in natural environments.
John

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