Plant ID forum→"Peppers on sticks" found in the forest

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Name: TK
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6b)
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Macrocentra
Jun 16, 2021 8:53 PM CST
I found this plant in a forest today while hiking. I was having trouble getting a good focus to zoom in. They look like tiny peppers on the end of a bare stem.
Thumb of 2021-06-17/Macrocentra/600f05
Thumb of 2021-06-17/Macrocentra/cbc84a

Any ideas what these might be? I've never seen them before.
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
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Leftwood
Jun 17, 2021 5:47 PM CST
Drought stressed wild garlic (Allium triccocum)? They normally are straight up.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jun 17, 2021 6:19 PM CST
Could it be something like Orobanche uniflora?

https://www.guilhemmansion.com...
Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
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Silversurfer
Jun 18, 2021 1:41 AM CST
Any chance of a return visit to get a pic of the open flower?
California (Zone 9b)
CalPolygardener
Jun 18, 2021 7:07 AM CST
Maybe Erythronium?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jun 18, 2021 7:45 AM CST
CalPolygardener said:Maybe Erythronium?


Good thought, seed pods. I have some wild Erythronium, the flowers and leaves are long gone. I can check later to see if there are any pods since I'm also in Ontario, although two zones colder than the OP.
Name: TK
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Sempervivums Bromeliad Tropicals Aroids Hibiscus
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Macrocentra
Jun 18, 2021 8:21 AM CST
If I have time next week, I might head back over there. I'll see if they've changed in any way. Smiling

They're one of the few plants growing around there. That forest is oddly barren in the center.

Erythronium could be a match. I have seen E. americanum in many of the other local forests. Do they shed their leaves when they produce seeds?
[Last edited by Macrocentra - Jun 18, 2021 8:24 AM (+)]
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Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Jun 18, 2021 1:46 PM CST
To me, those heads look like they haven't opened yet. Erythronium seed capsules don't have the abrupt shoulders that your pics show:
http://www.efloras.org/object_...

I can't say I have ever observed E. americanum during the seed production. I always assumed leaves are still present. Flora of North America makes no mention, although it does regarding Allium tricoccum. But the FNA isn't very consistent with its descriptions, as it is written by many, many different taxonomy botanists. Also, that would be an incredible find to discover any eastern American Erythronium that is so floriferous.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Jun 18, 2021 8:11 PM CST
I sure don't know that much about northern North American woodland herbaceous flora, but I've spent a good bit of time in the woods and other such environments around here in the Ohio River valley region.

In looking at those two images - and noting a key statement by Macrocentra (..."That forest is oddly barren in the center...") - I wonder if we are observing the emergence of some wetland plant. It would make sense for such flora to have long stems to support the foliage when this site is seasonally under water.

Nymphaea odorata? Sagittaria latifolia? Pontederia cordata?

"Somebody tell Tree-boy to go back to woody plants..."
John

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