Houseplants forum: Orchid cactus

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Name: Tracy
Azalea Oregon (Zone 8a)
Region: Oregon Vegetable Grower Farmer Dog Lover Organic Gardener
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tracerracer
Feb 16, 2013 11:10 PM CST
My mom has an orchid cactus that I just gave a major 'haircut' to........... ( she was moving and tryin' to move a 6'+ hanging plant, well, she didn't wanna 'deal' with that...... ) I was thinkin' about trying to 'save' some for starts ( I realize this is probably the worst time of yr to do this) But, does anyone have suggestions on how to do this?.............. I have a LOT of cuttings, no way to save them all... If I remember correctly, it has a beautiful peach/pink flower ................... Thanks
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit.
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
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sheryl
Feb 18, 2013 10:11 PM CST
Huh, Tracy.... I think you're talking about an Epiphyllum, but maybe one of the Christmas cactus? Do you have a picture of it?
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


Name: Tracy
Azalea Oregon (Zone 8a)
Region: Oregon Vegetable Grower Farmer Dog Lover Organic Gardener
Image
tracerracer
Feb 18, 2013 10:25 PM CST
I don't have a picture of her's ( and call it an orchid catus, because that's what the lady at the nursery called it when she gave us a cutting several years ago) BUT! I found a page that has one that looks very similar ( except for the bloom color) ......................... http://www.silive.com/homegarden/garden/index.ssf/2008/06/th...

Mom's was bigger/longer than this one........
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit.
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
[Last edited by tracerracer - Feb 18, 2013 10:26 PM (+)]
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Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
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sheryl
Feb 19, 2013 7:58 PM CST
Oh good, well - you're in luck. These are very easy to start. Take the leaf cutting and either submerge the cut end about a half inch into a well-draining potting mix (cactus mix should work fine) or even just lay the leaf down on top of the soil. They root from the mid-rib on the underside of the leaf, and do so fairly quickly. I want to say mine took within a couple of weeks, maybe three.

Do not water the cuttings before they get roots; that will cause rot faster than anything. If the cuttings are starting to look a little shriveled, you can spritz them with a little water, but I'm guessing you live in a fairly humid environment. Keep the cuttings warm and don't put them in direct sun.

Hope this helps!
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


Name: Tracy
Azalea Oregon (Zone 8a)
Region: Oregon Vegetable Grower Farmer Dog Lover Organic Gardener
Image
tracerracer
Feb 19, 2013 10:31 PM CST
sheryl said:Oh good, well - you're in luck. These are very easy to start. Take the leaf cutting and either submerge the cut end about a half inch into a well-draining potting mix (cactus mix should work fine) or even just lay the leaf down on top of the soil. They root from the mid-rib on the underside of the leaf, and do so fairly quickly. I want to say mine took within a couple of weeks, maybe three.

Do not water the cuttings before they get roots; that will cause rot faster than anything. If the cuttings are starting to look a little shriveled, you can spritz them with a little water, but I'm guessing you live in a fairly humid environment. Keep the cuttings warm and don't put them in direct sun.

Hope this helps!


Thanks, that's what I've done, just makin' sure that was right ( thanks for the heads up on the water ) My climate is fairly humid, but our main source of heat is our woodstove, so not so much in the house ( I am incredibly 'tight fisted and hate payin' to run a furnace, plus where I live, power outages are a way of life Rolling my eyes. )
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit.
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
Image
sheryl
Feb 20, 2013 4:58 PM CST
I'm with you - part of the reason I live down here, lol.

If you have an older fridge that puts out heat, that's a great place to keep things warm. Or near (but not really near) the wood stove, assuming you keep it going 24/7. Keep in mind too that wood stoves are horribly drying, so if it's in the same room you might want to put a plastic cover (like a cut milk carton or something) to keep it humid; open it up for a little while each day to keep the air circulating.

If you do seed starting and have -or want to invest- in a heat mat, that's a perfect way to keep things going; I've found that almost *anything* roots better with bottom heat.
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


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