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Name: Plant killer
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
bucsnation1984
Oct 23, 2021 2:37 PM CST
(amazon.com/gp/product/B099RYSN36/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

I purchased this. I'd like to keep the plants inside. When I killed off my other batch of plants and got these, I read online when you put plants in a new pot you should keep them outside for two weeks for the roots? So I did. I noticed a lot of bugs were getting to my plants out on my balcony, so not sure if that is ideal. Hopefully this works well. It has a timer on it too, which is nice.

[Last edited by bucsnation1984 - Oct 23, 2021 2:40 PM (+)]
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Name: Plant killer
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
bucsnation1984
Nov 10, 2021 9:31 AM CST
Hey guys. So I got the grow light, and this
Plant went from white, to this....not enough water or what?



Thumb of 2021-11-10/bucsnation1984/bef3c6


Thumb of 2021-11-10/bucsnation1984/ebcb52



Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Nov 10, 2021 9:46 AM CST

Moderator

Looks like it rotted near the base. The plant may have already been on the way out when you put it under the light.
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Nov 10, 2021 11:46 AM CST
I think the plant had a bacterial infection. The light had no effect on the infection as it was already there and growing.
Donald
South Germany (Zone 7b)
just mlem on!
Miniature Gardening Cactus and Succulents Garden Art Plant and/or Seed Trader
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dewayx
Nov 10, 2021 11:47 AM CST
Oh my, yea, that looks like a rot and a dry out because of the rot... happened to a lot of mine too, haworthia, echeveria, pachyphytum...
Sometimes it just feels like paying taxes to the devil, just can't evade those taxes Sad
get the mlems in! Don't let them get wet or stale outside, come on!
Name: Plant killer
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
bucsnation1984
Nov 11, 2021 3:21 PM CST
I hardly watered it....do you think some bug got inside the soil and went to town or something? That's why I was against putting the plants outside...
Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
CPPgardener
Nov 11, 2021 3:39 PM CST
It's just rot, not a bug.
“That which is, is.That which happens, happens.” Douglas Adams
Name: Plant killer
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
bucsnation1984
Nov 12, 2021 10:17 PM CST
CPPgardener said:It's just rot, not a bug.


How does a plant rot like that? I thought that happens if you water too much, which I don't think I ever have. These things have gone a month without water..
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Nov 12, 2021 10:33 PM CST

Moderator

Sometimes if you go too long without water, the plant weakens and the roots die off and the plant is unable to deal with a proper drenching the next time it occurs. Withholding water can provoke rot in this way. Underwatering sometimes leads to the same general end result as overwatering. Unless it's cold and/or dark, there's no particular advantage to withholding water (ie. allowing the soil to stay bone dry for any extended period of time).

Rot is one of those things that experienced growers recognize and are familiar with, but it's not always obvious to even them what provoked it. The process sometimes gets started a while before you notice anything, making it close to impossible to make a save by the time the entire stem has gone brown or whatever, and a matter of (educated) guesswork as to what the primary cause may have been, however many weeks ago (or whatever) it kicked in.

In a general way rot is associated with too much water, too little light, too little air flow, water trapped between the leaves, poor drainage, root damage or failure, or any possible combination of these elements. And probably a few others that I can't think of right off hand.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Nov 12, 2021 10:33 PM (+)]
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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Nov 12, 2021 10:57 PM CST
And most soils contain it. It just takes a set of conditions favorable to it and the bacteria goes rampant. My experience indicates it can also be latent in the plant tissue and be dormant there for long periods of time before circumstances trigger it into growth. I once received a bare root plant that looked great. I set it out on a wire rack prior to planting and it was there with good air circulation and no direct sun, mild temperatures along with 4-5 other plants of the same kind. Within five days it was a smelly, mushy mess. The other plants shipped with it from the same source were fine. There's no way the supplier could have known it had bacterial rot when it was packed. It was clearly infected when it shipped to me but even when I opened the package nothing was apparent. I'm guessing being closed up in the package was enough to trigger the bacteria into active growth. It's often really difficult to know the specific set of circumstances that trigger it.
Donald
Name: Plant killer
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
bucsnation1984
Nov 14, 2021 12:55 AM CST
Question, whenever I water the soil on these things are already dry within 24 hours. Is that normal? Am I thinking too much into it now?
Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
CPPgardener
Nov 14, 2021 2:30 PM CST
You're probably not watering enough when you water it. It should take at least a week to dry enough to need more water. Indoors more like 2 weeks.
“That which is, is.That which happens, happens.” Douglas Adams
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Nov 14, 2021 2:34 PM CST

Moderator

The top layer of soil dries out much sooner than the soil at depth. What matters is the latter. John has given you a good approximate range of how long it may take.
Name: Plant killer
(Zone 9b)
Region: California
bucsnation1984
Nov 15, 2021 4:39 PM CST
Should I be drenching these things? I usually let them drain out two/three times...it's probably this soil and the pots too that don't help. It's clay pots so they seem to absorb the mositure as well.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Nov 15, 2021 5:25 PM CST

Moderator

Yes, I would water to saturation, in more than one pass, making sure the pot does not sit in a lake afterward. The clay pot definitely will absorb some moisture.

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